Work starts at Delta Lakes for multi-million-pound wellness village

Initial ground works underway to support the ‘once in a lifetime’ future development of the Llanelli Waterside Joint Venture land.

 

 Alun Griffiths (Contractors) Ltd has been appointed to carry out the site preparation works following a competitive tender exercise using the council’s contractor framework.

 

The Wellness and Life Science Village – which will see an investment of more than £200million along the Llanelli coastline - is being led by Carmarthenshire County Council, under the ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) programme, which is a partnership between Hywel Dda and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Boards and Swansea University.

 

It is also a key project for the Swansea Bay City Region and is earmarked to receive £40million as part of the £1.3billion City Deal funding.

 

The largest ever regeneration project in South West Wales, it aims to improve the health and wellbeing of people across the region, creating high quality jobs and boosting the economy.

 

The proposals include an Institute of Life Science with laboratory and clinic space and an incubation facility for business start-up, research and development; a wellness hub incorporating a new ‘state-of-the-art’ sports and leisure centre, a wellbeing centre, a wellness hotel and an assisted living village all interlinked and set within a ‘green’ eco-park.

 

Council Leader Emlyn Dole said: “This is a very exciting time for the region and I am delighted to see that initial works have started. Delta Lakes will provide a ‘world class’ Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli bringing together health, leisure, business and research.

 

“As well as encouraging people to lead healthier lives and delivering care closer to people’s homes; it aims to build on the success of the Institute of Life Science (ILS) at Swansea University attracting private sector investment which will create up to 2000 good quality, well-paid jobs across a range of professions and boost the economy by a staggering £467 million over 15 years.”

 

The Swansea Bay City Deal is a £1.3billion investment that will transform the economic landscape of the area, boosting the local economy by £1.8billion, and generating almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years.

 

The Swansea Bay City Region Board includes four local authorities – Carmarthenshire County Council, Swansea City Council, Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council and Pembrokeshire County Council - together with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, and private sector companies.

It was signed by Prime Minister Theresa May and Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones, the Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns, Welsh Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Local Government Professor Mark Drakeford, and the leaders of the four authorities on Monday, March 20, 2017.

 

CAPTION: Carmarthenshire Chief Executive Mark James, Council Leader Emlyn Dole, local members Louvain Roberts and John Prosser with representatives of Alun Griffiths (Contractors) Ltd at the Delta Lakes site.

 

IBI group appointed to Swansea Wellness Centre project

Feasibility study for Swansea health & wellbeing scheme gets underway

Swansea Council, in partnership with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, has commissioned specialist healthcare advisors, IBI Group, to work on the feasibility of a new city centre wellness centre that aims to address future trends in healthcare.

In a move to place as much emphasis on people’s wellbeing as on healthcare, the partners are seeking to examine how to create a state-of-the-art wellness centre that also makes full use of the opportunities afforded by healthcare technology.

The forward-thinking proposal will mean city centre residents can combine a trip to see their GP with the use of a wide range of non-clinical services that can support health and wellbeing in a drive to encourage individuals to take greater care of their health.

The IBI Group are looking at a range of city centre locations which are currently being scored as part of the feasibility study. IBI are providing expert advice on what the wellness centre could contain, as well as the viability, preferred location, and delivery options for the proposal is IBI Group, which has a track record in the development of innovative health and wellbeing centres across the UK.

The new facility would be an integrated development which could include facilities such as a GP services, community healthcare, services from the third sector, a satellite facility from Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science – the research and innovation arm of the Medical School, and an education and skills development centre.

Justin Harris, IBI Group studio principal, said: “Pressures on our healthcare systems are increasing due to rapid population growth and rising costs. Therefore, we need to create environments that enable the right care at the right time, and most importantly support lifestyles that promote mental and physical wellbeing.

“The Swansea Wellness Centre will offer visitors a choice to how they manage their health, and for staff, a high-quality environment to better deliver support to the community.”

 An alliance of local agencies called Swansea Public Services Board (PSB) will be helping to shape the proposals. The board includes Swansea Council, ABMU Health Board and the innovative health initiative ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health). The proposals will look to address the long-term wellbeing of the population and will form part of Swansea’s wider regeneration plans, and the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable places scheme.

 Professor Hamish Laing, ABMU medical director and ARCH board member, said: “We want to provide our citizens with fit-for-purpose, modern healthcare service that is built on the ethos of prevention and early intervention. Moreover, we want to give everyone the opportunity to place personal health and wellbeing at the heart of their daily routine.”

 ARCH is a partnership between ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University, aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people living in South West Wales. It was formed to tackle many of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.

 Siân Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU director of strategy and ARCH board member, said: “We are pleased to see this Swansea wellness project moving forward with the appointment of IBI Group.

“This centre will be part of a wider regional network of ARCH health and wellbeing schemes being developed across the whole of South West Wales including the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village in Delta Lakes which is being led by Carmarthenshire Council.

 “Too many people in our region die younger than in other parts of the UK. We also have an ageing population, often with complex needs and we are facing significant service challenges.

“Too many people are currently treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere. With our health service facing unprecedented challenges, there is a clear need for us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care.

 “These schemes will allow people to access the care and support they need in their communities and help ensure demand is better managed across the whole care system. They will also regenerate areas and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health.”

 IBI Group are due to report their findings to Welsh Government by the end of June.

Swansea University’s Medical School named in UK’s top 3 alongside Oxford and Cambridge

Swansea University’s Medical School is celebrating after being named the 3rd best medical school in the UK – only beaten by Oxford and Cambridge.

The university, which was named Wales’s number one university in The Times Good University Guide last year, is one of only three universities in Wales to improve on last year’s position in The Complete University Guide 2018 by moving up one place to 44th in the UK. But it is the ongoing success of the Swansea University’s Medical School which has seen them secure a top three place - alongside the UK’s leading universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean of the Medical School, said he was delighted to be in the company of such illustrious institutions in the 2018 rankings.

Prof Lloyd said: “I am delighted to be able to say that Swansea University’s Medical School is ranked 1st in the UK for research environment, 2nd for overall research quality and is now the UK’s 3rd best medical school beaten only by Oxford and Cambridge.

“The rankings are measured by our research quality and intensity, our employability and graduate prospects and student satisfaction. As a school we are constantly striving to innovate, expand and deliver world-class education. This success is a huge pat on the back for all our staff and our students.

“Following the signing of the £1.3billion Swansea Bay City Region City Deal, of which the Medical School is a part through the ARCH partnership, we are committed to being part of delivering a region which can excel and attract the very best talent and skills, but also investment.”

Professor Lloyd added: “This is truly an exciting time for this region, the City Deal will allow us to accelerate ARCH projects such as regional expansion of our Institute of Life Science and the Medical School’s Healthcare Technology and Innovation Centre on the Singleton Campus.  These projects will be central to helping us create new job and  support business growth in the health and life science sector and also allow us to create new products and services - which will not only deliver economic growth - but also positively benefit patients.”

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards. ARCH forms the health and wellbeing element of the Swansea Bay City Region which aims to transform the economic landscape of the area with high-spec digital infrastructure and world-class facilities in the fields of health and life science innovation, energy and smart manufacturing.

ABMU and ARCH chairman Prof Andrew Davies has praised the success of the Medical School and emphasised the school’s critical role within delivering both the ARCH and City Region vision.

Professor Davies said: “I am delighted for the Medical School, this ranking demonstrates the excellence we have right here on our doorstep.

“Having been heavily involved as a Welsh Minister and local Assembly Member in establishing Swansea University’s Medical School it is a great pleasure for me to see the Medical School fulfilling the vision and ambitions we had for it in the early years of the Welsh Assembly - and showing the rest of the UK a clean pair of heels.

“ARCH is a pro-active response to the urgent requirement to reshape and upskill the workforce to be fit for purpose with changing service models, patient expectations and overall needs. We have already seen the establishment of the Medical School’s new Physician Associate course, which has seen 15 funded place students begin their training as in 2016 and funding agreed for a further 2017 intake. ARCH aims to establish a pipeline which builds on the Medical School’s success to date by making the most of the opportunities to train future staff to meet the need articulated by the health boards.”

Professor Lloyd added: “I want to thank all our staff and students for their ongoing commitment to deliver world-class education, research and innovation that make a real difference for health and wellbeing.”

The Complete University Guide 2018 states:  “Swansea University has made a real statement in making a consistent Medicine Top 10 appearance since it first debuted in this subject table.  Swansea's meteoric rise to the top is driven by its research quality score, with the student satisfaction and graduate prospects scores solidly backing it up.”

For the Complete University Guide 2018 visit:

https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings?s=medicine

ARCH partners submit Portfolio Delivery Plan to Welsh Government

ARCH submits Portfolio Delivery Plan to Welsh Government

ARCH was formed because we believe a joined up, regional approach is the only way we will be able to deliver meaningful change to improve the health, wealth, and wellbeing of South West Wales.

ARCH is a unique proposition, built on an ethos of collaboration - working together to find a regional solution to tackle enduring societal and economic challenges. It is helping our region tackle 21st Century health challenges, while in a way that stays true to the founding principles of the NHS.

Over the past 18 months, we have put our words into action, developed robust partnership arrangements, compelling plans, and got on with delivering those projects within our control, including ensuring ARCH is one strand of the recently signed £1.3billion City Deal bid for the Swansea Bay City Region.

We have now submitted our Portfolio Delivery Plan (PDP) to Welsh Government for their consideration. The PDP is essentially a roadmap to delivering the ARCH vision.

Over the next three years, we commit to delivering the plans set out within the PDP document.

We face significant service challenges. Too many people are treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere; care is not joined up between teams and is not always of a consistent quality.

We spend too much money dealing with the symptoms rather than causes of ill health and our health service faces unprecedented financial challenges, requiring us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care and structures.

The actions we have taken and are proposing in the PDP respond directly to these challenges; balancing the need to make urgent improvements to our core business and performance at the same time as transforming our service models. Specifically, our plan describes action in the following four key areas:

-Skills, education and workforce:

We will recover and stabilise health board expenditure on flexible staffing arrangements, which not only contribute to a significant variable pay bill but also threaten the continuity and quality of healthcare. In addition to immediate workforce control measures, we are working with Swansea University and other educational partners to train the next generation of healthcare professionals and scientists, including developing novel recruitment and retention approaches. Together, we will make South West Wales a destination of choice to train, work, and live due to the exciting agenda being advanced by ARCH.

-Health and Wellbeing:

We will accelerate the development of several health and wellbeing schemes, with primary care at their heart, designed to ensure people can access the care and support they need in their communities, and reducing demand on a pressurised secondary care system. Most schemes are part of wider Public Service Board (PSBs) developments that aim to regenerate and breath life back into places, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health and wellbeing.

-Service Transformation:

We have identified 10 clinical and service areas, where we will plan and manage our services over a regional footprint, developing our proposals in partnership with our citizens, to ensure high standards of care and support provided to all of our communities. Our service transformations will be underpinned by cutting edge research and scientific advancements, ensuring the healthcare delivered in our region is cutting edge.

-Research, Enterprise and Innovation:

We are providing the foundations for joined up business and investment proposals to boost the economic growth of the area. The City Deal was considerably driven by the expertise, talent and capability of Swansea University. The economic “accelerator partnership” of ARCH will cement the region’s role as a test bed for new health technologies, particular through expanding our successful Institute of Life Science. We will continue to nurture and create high quality jobs and bring prosperity to South West Wales.

These areas represent big opportunities for us but there will be challenges along the way. We realise that now is the time to be bold to deliver against Welsh Government’s ambitious agenda to create a Wales which is prosperous and secure, healthy and active, ambitious and learning, united and connected, and there is a real commitment from each of the partners to ensure our vision and aims are implemented and delivered.

This is an ambitious plan – the first of its kind in this country – and we invite the Welsh Government to walk alongside us as we move into an implementation phase.

ARCH offers a fantastic opportunity to grow and develop together, not least in respect of health and healthcare. We’re starting from a strong place as a number of excellent processes for working collaboratively across the area are already in place.

Through ARCH, we have a great opportunity to respond swiftly and effectively to the needs of our communities and to co-produce a healthier future with them.

 

ARCH offers a fantastic opportunity to grow and develop together, not least in respect of health and healthcare. We’re starting from a strong place as a number of excellent processes for working

collaboratively across the area are already in place.

Through ARCH, we have a great opportunity to respond swiftly and effectively to the needs of our communities and to co-produce a healthier future with them.

New Health & Wellbeing Academy will 'transform healthcare'

College opens new Health & Wellbeing Academy in Singleton

A new health & wellbeing academy dedicated to providing non-medical treatments will "transform healthcare" in South West Wales, Swansea University has said.

The centre, based at the university's College of Human and Health Sciences, will offer osteopathy, post-bereavement care, midwifery support and brain injuries rehabilitation. It is hoped the service will help ease pressure on NHS services.

Students at the centre will observe and learn in a real clinical setting.

 The centre, which is being delivered as part of the £600million ARCH partnership, was opened by Health Secretary Vaughan Gething on Monday, March 6.

Academy director Julia Pridmore said some of the services, like audiology and osteopathy, will be available for drop-in patients.

She said: "If we make it easier for people to have themselves checked out at the first sign of trouble, or even just to reassure themselves that they are healthy, then hopefully we can reduce the amount of cases which become acute, requiring costly and difficult hospital treatment later on."

The academy, together with bereavement charity Cruse, has created a children's bereavement support group.

One of the services currently in very short supply across Wales is specialist post-bereavement care for children and young people.

Dr Zac Maunder, who manages the group, said: "Research shows that early intervention can be enormously beneficial for bereaved young people, but all too often there are shortages of specially-trained counsellors and lengthy waiting lists. We now have the chance to provide a forum for young people to talk to us and each other."

The health and wellbeing secretary said the academy will "enable staff to engage in cutting edge research that will drive innovation and excellence in Wales".

 

ARCH and ABMU chair Prof Andrew Davies added: “I am delighted to see the Health & Wellbeing Academy up and running. This unique facility is one of the first services to be delivered as part of the ambitious ARCH portfolio proposed for the region.

“The ARCH partners are working together to ensure South West Wales is able to deliver high-quality patient care and ensure we have staff with the right skills to do so. Working with our university colleagues on projects such as the academy is an important step in delivering these aims.”

 

New online forum helps NHS staff in South West Wales connect and improve care

 An innovative online forum has been launched which brings together NHS staff and academics who are all working to improve health services in this region.

The online forum is called ARCH-i, the i standing for “improvement” and will allow busy NHS professionals access to a range of improvement resources and ready access to expertise in South West Wales. The developing field of improvement science has been widely applied in industry to improve services and ensure reliability but uptake in health services across the world is still at a relatively early stage. 

ARCH-i is being delivered through the ARCH Portfolio. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards and Swansea University aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales.

ARCH was formed to tackle some of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.  These three organisations have come together to action significant change at scale - and at pace.

 ABMU chair and ARCH chair Professor Andrew Davies has praised the launch of the new online improvement forum. He said: “I am delighted the ARCH partnership is able to support this excellent network of our staff.

“We already have many best-in-class services.

“This online meeting place will ensure we are making the most of the huge amount of expertise available across South West Wales and support our clinicians to share experience and continue to achieve excellence.”

 The network already has over 200 members and aims to achieve 1,000 active participants within its first three months.

Christopher Jones, ABMU Pharmacist &Improvement Science Practitioner at Singleton Hospital’s Cancer Centre, said NHS staff in this area were keen to learn from each other and share the wealth of expertise in both ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards, as well as maximise the research taking place in Swansea University around improvement science.

Mr Jones said: “We all want to improve the care and services we provide. There is a huge amount of experience and expertise in ABMU and being able to tap into this is invaluable in my day to day work.

“By adding Swansea University and Hywel Dda health board to the mix, this means potentially 30,000 NHS employees can share best practice, innovation and so much more – all of which will contribute to improving NHS care.”

Jessicca Svetz, Hywel Dda University Health Board’s Service Improvement Manager praised the new forum. She said: “The ARCH-i project and subsequent online portal will become the one-stop-shop for service improvement professionals in the health sector of South West Wales.

“We envisage that this will drive collaboration, along with the spread of ideas and best practice all with the end goal of improving patient experiences.

 “ARCH-i is a much needed resource for academic, clinical and management professionals associated with the health sector. Linking these three professional groups will drive improvement to the service areas at most need, by allowing for the most up to date thinking being translated to on the ground delivery of services.” 

Over 50 improvement science professionals from Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University got together in person earlier this month to share their experiences along with colleagues from The Bevan Commission, at the SHINE event hosted at Parc y Scarlets in Llanelli.

Dr Sharon Williams, ARCH-i Project lead, based at Swansea University, said the event helped shape the direction of the online portal. She said: “The event provided us with a vital opportunity to drive the direction of ARCH-i, which will link improvers and improvement across South West Wales. ARCH-i will provide a virtual meeting point for news updates, sharing and collaboration, a gateway to an international improvement community, learning and problem solving and the spread of ideas and good practice.

“So many of our clinicians and managers are doing excellent improvement work but ARCH-i will give them ready access to advice and support plus a way to share their expertise. Providing this via a web resource fits well with people’s busy schedules.

“There will be regular hot topics for members to discuss and we want to encourage members to have an instant dialogue to be able to exchange improvement ideas and innovations.”

 Sign up here: http://www.arch.wales/forum-register.htm

Research on baby sleep patterns helps parents

Should babies really sleep through the night? Swansea Uni's College of Human and Health Science at Swansea University has the answer

A new animated research video intended to help new mothers to find out more about baby sleep patterns and feeding has been created by Swansea University.

The film summarises research by academics at Swansea University's College of Human and Health Sciences which challenges the idea that babies should be sleeping through the night and disproves the myth that stopping breastfeeding or giving more solid food to babies helps them to sleep longer at night.

Dr Amy Brown, programme director for the MSc Child Public Health course, said: “The film helps to highlight the key research findings which firstly contest the idea that babies should be sleeping through the night once they are past a few weeks old and secondly that what you feed babies will help their sleep. There is a common belief that formula milk or giving more solid foods will help your baby sleep better and this study shows this isn’t true. We did find that mothers who were breastfeeding fed their baby more at night but this could be because breastfeeding is a simple way to get your baby back to sleep quickly! The babies who were formula fed still woke up, they just weren’t fed.”

The study asked 715 mothers with a baby aged 6 – 12 months how often their baby usually woke in the night and whether they fed their baby when it woke.

The research found:

  • 78% of babies at this age still regularly woke at least once in the night
  • 61% of babies had at least one milk feed during the night.
  • there was no difference in the number of times babies woke up dependent on whether they were breast or formula fed, how many feeds they had in the day or how many solid meals they ate.

Dr Brown said: “We hope that this film and our findings are of comfort to new mothers who have a baby who is still waking in the night, in showing them that many other babies are waking too. We hope that it will also give new mothers confidence to continue breastfeeding and introducing solids gradually as they know stopping will not magically make their baby sleep.”

Swansea University’s  College of Human and Health Sciences is a key part  of the ARCH Programme. The college is represented on all of the ARCH working groups underpinning the ARCH developments. The college is one of  the largest providers of non-medical health professions education in Wales, as well as a provider of social work qualifications, a psychology department with close working relationships with both health boards, an ethics group and research centres in Ageing and Health Economics. This means the college is a major player in the Skills and Workforce Development arm of ARCH.

Eating disorder app launched through new Swansea University innovation project

£13.5million project to pioneer research has been launched

 A £13.5million project which brings together academics, clinicians and industry to pioneer research into cutting-edge health technologies is now up and running.

 Welsh Government Finance Secretary, Mark Drakeford, said: “This project will stimulate innovation in the NHS, turning new ideas into improved health services, while also paving the way for new jobs and business opportunities.

“This is another good example of how EU funds – combined with Welsh Government support – are supporting research, innovation and science in Wales.”

Led by Swansea University through the ARCH partnership, AgorIP is working with the NHS and industry across Wales to turn innovative research into new products and services.

The  project which was backed by the Welsh Government and the European  Regional Development Fund last year aims to support the transformation of research with the potential for commercialisation in universities and health boards. Agor – which in Welsh means “open” – and IP which stands for “Intellectual Property” aims to encourage and support everyone working in the NHS in Wales to turn their ideas into reality.

Dr Gerry Ronan, from Swansea University, is leading the project. He said: “This is another positive example of how Swansea University’s collaboration with the NHS can help drive forward new concepts and research to grow our knowledge economy, putting Wales on a global platform.

“As part of the AgorIP project, commercial sector experts will help progress new ideas through experimental and industrial development, demonstrating proof of concept to potential funders and attracting further research investment.

“AgorIP was piloted through the Welsh Government’s Academia for Business project, which was supported by the EU funding programme 2007-13. AgorIP secured £4million of private sector funding to create six spin-outs within a year. This project will build on this first phase, opening up a pipeline of untapped research and turning innovative ideas into products and services for the commercial market.” 

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda university health boards. ARCH covers six local authority areas and benefits 1 million people across South West Wales.

The ARCH partnership brings together health and science to transform the way health is delivered in the region. Unlocking and supporting innovation is one of the aims of the ARCH partnership.

Professor Marc Clement, ARCH board member Swansea University’s Dean of the School of Management, said: “As a university we pride ourselves on our links with industry and this is another example of how sectors can work together. This ARCH project will help unlock innovation in the NHS and will provide a support service to drive this innovation and realise the huge value from Intellectual Property (IP) generated across ARCH region and indeed Wales.”

Dr Ronan added: “AgorIP will open a pipeline of untapped valuable opportunities to work with researchers and NHS staff  to disclose concepts with development potential.

“An example of how this works in practice is our work with Aneurin Bevan University Health Board to develop an app which aims to support the prevention of eating disorders. The Diet or Disorder? app provides tools to support and empower those who might have an eating disorder as well as their loved ones. The app provides a host of information in a portable format and gives education about eating disorders, including decisional tools to help identify an eating problem. It also signposts to the available support in Wales, simple self-help strategies and links to other resources.”

The app, which is free for android, smartphone and tablet users, has been developed with input from the Adult Eating Disorders Service, sufferers, carers and the third sector, with advice from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Network (CAHMS), public health, education and healthcare professionals. It has been designed and tested by both experts by experience and members of the public who are not familiar with eating disorders, as well as health professionals.

The App, which has been funded by the AgorIP project with money from the Welsh Government, was launched by Vaughan Gething, Cabinet Secretary for Health, at the Senedd last week.

Jacinta Tan, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Swansea University led the development of the app, she said: “There are currently 1.6 million people in the UK who are directly affected by eating disorders and the healthcare costs to the NHS is between £3.9 and £4.6 billion each year. Eating disorders are serious and have the highest mortality rates of any mental disorder and that’s because only a minority of people receive the help needed from specialist or general mental health services.

“Evidence has shown that eating disorders usually begin in adolescence and young adulthood and early identification and intervention is vital as recovery is less likely if remained untreated for over three years. This app aims to get straight to those who need it most with the benefits derived from such early intervention.”

The AgorIP project will be officially launched at this year’s MediWales Connects conference in Cardiff on June 21. The event brings together NHS Wales, academia and industry to share clinical innovation in practice which improves the care patients receive.

This year’s conference, which is being held in Cardiff’s Mecure Holland House Hotel, will also showcase the work of the ARCH partnership including the development of health and wellbeing schemes across South West Wales as well as how the recently signed Swansea Bay City Region City Deal will accelerate the delivery of many of the ARCH projects. 

 

Swansea City Centre to benefit from GP and wellbeing services under one roof

IBI Group to develop feasibility study of new city centre wellness centre

Swansea Council, in partnership with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, has commissioned specialist healthcare advisors, IBI Group, to work on the feasibility of a new city centre wellness centre that aims to address future trends in healthcare.

 In a move to place as much emphasis on people’s wellbeing as on healthcare, the partners are seeking to examine how to create a state-of-the-art wellness centre that also makes full use of the opportunities afforded by healthcare technology.

 The forward-thinking proposal will mean city centre residents can combine a trip to see their GP with the use of a wide range of non-clinical services that can support health and wellbeing in a drive to encourage individuals to take greater care of their health.

 The IBI Group are looking at a range of city centre locations which are currently being scored as part of the feasibility study. IBI are providing expert advice on what the wellness centre could contain, as well as the viability, preferred location, and delivery options for the proposal is IBI Group, which has a track record in the development of innovative health and wellbeing centres across the UK.

 

The new facility would be an integrated development which could include facilities such as a GP services, community healthcare, services from the third sector, a satellite facility from Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science – the research and innovation arm of the Medical School, and an education and skills development centre.

 

Justin Harris, IBI Group studio principal, said: “Pressures on our healthcare systems are increasing due to rapid population growth and rising costs. Therefore, we need to create environments that enable the right care at the right time, and most importantly support lifestyles that promote mental and physical wellbeing.

“The Swansea Wellness Centre will offer visitors a choice to how they manage their health, and for staff, a high-quality environment to better deliver support to the community.”

 

An alliance of local agencies called Swansea Public Services Board (PSB) will be helping to shape the proposals. The board includes Swansea Council, ABMU Health Board and the innovative health initiative ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health). The proposals will look to address the long-term wellbeing of the population and will form part of Swansea’s wider regeneration plans, and the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable places scheme.

 

Professor Hamish Laing, ABMU medical director and ARCH board member, said: “We want to provide our citizens with fit-for-purpose, modern healthcare service that is built on the ethos of prevention and early intervention. Moreover, we want to give everyone the opportunity to place personal health and wellbeing at the heart of their daily routine.”

 

ARCH is a  partnership between ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University, aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people living in South West Wales. It was formed to tackle many of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.

 

Siân Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU director of strategy and ARCH board member, said: “We are pleased to see this Swansea wellness project moving forward with the appointment of IBI Group.

“This centre will be part of a wider regional network of ARCH health and wellbeing schemes being developed across the whole of South West Wales including the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village in Delta Lakes which is being led by Carmarthenshire Council.

 

“Too many people in our region die younger than in other parts of the UK. We also have an ageing population, often with complex needs and we are facing significant service challenges.

“Too many people are currently treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere. With our health service facing unprecedented challenges, there is a clear need for us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care.

 

“These schemes will allow people to access the care and support they need in their communities and help ensure demand is better managed across the whole care system. They will also regenerate areas and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health.”

 

IBI Group are due to report their findings to Welsh Government by the end of June.

 

New Health & Wellbeing Academy welcomes local Talent Bank students

Talent Bank students visit Health & Wellbeing Academy

Local students from the unique Talent Bank Further Education programme have been welcomed at Swansea’s newly opened Health & Wellbeing Academy.

A-level students from across the area were given a tour of the new academy, which was opened by Health Minister Vaughan Gething last week on Swansea University’s Singleton Campus.

Craig Toutt, Director of Academic and Clinical Operations at the Health and Wellbeing Academy, led the visit. He said: “The students demonstrated a strong desire to understand what it meant to be a healthcare professional, what skills they would need to develop and how they could plan their futures.

“All of the students were engaging and conducted themselves in a professional manner, we look forward to working closely with Talent Bank in the future to support their aims and help them take advantage of the fantastic facilities and expertise here in the Academy.”

Talent Bank, which is partnering with Gower College and being delivered through the ARCH partnership, is a bespoke Further Education programme specifically designed to support the evolving health and life science sector in South West Wales.

Talent Bank project director Beverley Wilson-Smith said the programme will ensure young people in this area graduate with the necessary skills to progress to university, go on to work-based learning or directly into employment.

Beverley Wilson-Smith said: “The Talent Bank will allow students from across the region working in partnership with FE providers to be exposed to the world of the NHS, industry and innovation.

“We know the workforce issues the health service faces and this programme is aimed at growing local talent and expanding the skills supply across the South West Wales region.

“Our students get hands-on, world-class exposure to industry experts from across the UK as well as health service professionals, innovators and leaders.

“The Talent Bank students were given a tour of the newly opened Academy where they learned about the various alternative non-medical career paths available to them such as osteopathy, audiology, cardiology to name but a few and they were delighted to see first hand the state-of-the-art resources available.

“I very much welcome this collaborative working approach between the Talent Bank and the Academy as it will help create much-needed work experience opportunities giving our youngsters a valuable insight into the vast range of non-medical NHS professions the College of Human and Health Sciences provides.

“We are now working closely with the college to design a health and wellbeing-based programme of education which will be set at the heart of future Talent Bank learning. This will be a vital component in teaching and training young people to consider their own health and wellbeing so that they stay well, healthy and fit for longer and reduce future pressures on the NHS.”

Talent Bank, which is being delivered through the ARCH partnership, is for young people aged 16+ wanting to study Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) A-levels or vocational and technical qualifications.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda university health boards who have come together to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

Prof Ceri Phillips, Head of College of Human and Health Sciences and ARCH board member, said he was delighted the students were able to view the academy first hand in its first few weeks of opening. Prof Phillips said: “The Talent Bank and Health & Wellbeing Academy are just two of the projects being delivered through the ARCH partnership. We were delighted to welcome the students and realise widening access into health & life science sector education is a vital part of tackling the NHS’s workforce issues.

“ARCH is focusing on activity which will generate the workforce pipeline of the future – to achieve this we must educate our health professionals of tomorrow in a way which ensures those nurtured and trained here are likely to stay and work within the region.

“I believe Talent Bank is a positive step towards re-orientating the education system which can deliver a workforce with the right skills to deliver next generation healthcare.”

 

 

 

Amy Hodgson, aged 17, from Baglan, was the Talent Bank’s very first student. The Gower College student is studying A-level Maths, Biology and Physics.

Here Amy, a former Glanafan pupil, talks about her experiences as a Talent Bank student:

“I first heard about the Talent Bank programme during an open evening at the Institute of Life Science at Swansea University last year. I knew I wanted to study biology and physics at A-level but wasn’t sure what I could do with those qualifications once I left college.

 

I take my normal lessons at college then I am released into Talent Bank one day a week. There are about 12 of us on the pilot project and it’s really helped me get a better view of life beyond A-levels.

 

We have been able to get first-hand experience in both the NHS and industry. We have visited pathology in Singleton Hospital, been part of an NHS induction at Morriston Hospital and seen cardiology staff at work and also learned how to take blood in the simulation suite at Morriston’s Education Centre which was brilliant. It was also really interesting to see the new Health & Wellbeing Academy and the non-medical career options the College of Human and Health sciences offers.

 

We have also carried out an industry challenge on diabetes, looking at the causes, symptoms, treatment and research linked to diabetes. We were able to work with Cello Novo a diabetes firm who are creating an artificial pancreas which was really interesting.

I was lucky enough to have 2 day placement at Swansea University’s Centre of Nanotechnology at the Institute of Life Science. I didn’t even know that kind of research and development existed.

 

Talent Bank has helped me decide that I want to pursue a career in medical engineering and I am hoping to get work experience in ABMU’s specialist rehab unit in Morriston over the summer.

I also been paired with a health mentor thanks to the Mullany Trust. My mentor is a cruise ship doctor and we speak virtually in a safe and monitored way so I can find out more about other career options available in health and life sciences.

 

It’s been great to be immersed in university life too thanks to the Fujitsu Innovation Hub on the Bay Campus. I am definitely considering staying in Swansea to continue my education and I hope I can start my career in this area too.

 

Talent Bank has opened my eyes to the opportunities here in South West Wales and helped me rule out as much as rule in education and employment choices, which has been so helpful to me and my parents.”

 

For more information on joining the 2017 Talent Bank programme, there will be a free open evening held at Morriston Hospital’s Education Department on April 5, 5pm to 7pm, visit www.talentbank.wales

£95 million funding package announced to support NHS training and education

Physician Associates course gets 2017 funding

Health Secretary, Vaughan Gething, has announced a £95 million package to support a range of education and training programmes for healthcare professionals in Wales. The funding package includes an additional cohort of Physician Associate training places available from September 2017 at Swansea University Medical School.

This significant investment will support nurses, physiotherapists, radiographers and a range of health science training opportunities. It will enable more than 3000 new students to join those already studying healthcare education programs across Wales.

The funding builds on Welsh Government funding already in place for nursing, providing more than a 13% increase in nursing training places, on top of the 10% increase in 2016/17 and 22% increase in 2015/16. Midwifery training places will increase by 40%.

The support package will also provide an additional £500,000 to support community healthcare such as advanced practice, education and extended skills training to support primary care clusters.

There will also be a significant increase in practice nurse and district nurse education as well as audiology training places within primary and community settings. This will provide vital funding for community services and will ensure many more patients can be cared for closer to home, rather than in hospital.

Health Secretary, Vaughan Gething said: “We rely on the skills, knowledge and experience of those providing the care in the NHS on a daily basis.

“This includes nurses and paramedics as well as those behind the scenes, who provide vital support services such as laboratory tests to enable diagnoses to be made and “treatment to be provided.

“Education and training is fundamental to ensuring the sustainability of our workforce.

“This £95m  investment will ensure that our healthcare professionals are able to provide  high quality care now and in the future and that patients’ will be able to receive care closer to home.“

The funding package also includes an additional cohort of physician associate training places available from September 2017 with 12 of these places hosted by Bangor University and 20 hosted by Swansea University.

It will also support the integration of hospital and community pharmacy training into one programme.

Swansea University offers a midwifery course that currently has a 100 per cent employment success rate within six months of graduation.

Professor Ceri Phillips, head of the College of Human and Health Sciences at Swansea University, said: "It is the case that those who choose to study locally tend to take up employment opportunities in the region and we welcome the opportunity to contribute to increasing and developing the future workforce of the NHS within this part of Wales.

"The college provides programmes in both its Swansea and Carmarthen sites and the increase in student numbers will be embraced within both locations.

"The college is also very conscious of the excessive sums of money that are currently paid to agencies to offset the shortages in the current workforce and it is evident that, by educating and training more nurses, midwives and other healthcare professionals in the medium-term, these financial pressures will be reduced by a sustained commitment to increasing the supply of the trained workforce".

 

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean and Head of Swansea University Medical School, said: "I am very grateful to Welsh Government for funding the additional physician associate places so that we can train more people to deliver the NHS workforce for Wales."

 

Health leaders delighted as Swansea Bay City Deal is given green light

Prime Minister signs £1.3bn City Deal in Swansea

Health and life science chiefs in South West Wales have welcomed the confirmation of the Swansea Bay City Region City Deal funding today from Westminster.

The City Deal is the biggest investment for South West Wales in a generation worth more than £1.3billion. The investment package aims to transform the economic landscape of the area with high-spec digital infrastructure and world-class facilities in the fields of health and life science innovation, energy and smart manufacturing.

The City Deal is expected to deliver nearly 10,000 new jobs and increase the value of goods and services produced in the region by £1.8billion.

Watch the ARCH City Deal video here

The Swansea Bay City Region includes the local authority areas of Carmarthenshire, Swansea, Pembrokeshire and Neath Port Talbot, joined by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, and private sector partners.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) forms the health and wellbeing strand of the City Deal.

ARCH is a unique partnership between ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards and Swansea University aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales. ARCH was formed to tackle some of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis. 

 

ABM University Health Board and ARCH chair Professor Andrew Davies has praised the news. He said: “We are delighted that the City Deal has been supported by Welsh Government and UK Government as this will help transform the health and economic opportunities of our region.

“The funding will also help us accelerate the development of health science campuses at Morriston and Singleton and the Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire.

“One of the strengths of ARCH has been its effectiveness as a vehicle for the three partners to develop joint solutions, which meet the challenges facing the health sector.

“The development of the City Deal will help us set the regional infrastructure and approach to support transformation in South West Wales.

“The Swansea Bay City Region is a bold vision which members of the ARCH Board have played a significant role in shaping.”

 

ABMU Medical Director and ARCH board member Professor Hamish Laing added that the announcement would help accelerate specific projects within ARCH aimed at creating an NHS fit for the 21st Century. Professor Laing said: “The announcement today is great news for our citizens and for our Health Board.

“This new money will help tackle some of the causes of illness and improve the wellbeing of our communities as well as seeing exciting developments in research, innovation and education alongside Morriston and Singleton Hospitals.

“The City Region team which presented our exciting ideas to government, led by Swansea Council’s Councillor Rob Stewart and Carmarthenshire Council’s Mark James, has done a great job in making the case for investment in the region.

As a health board we have digital ambitions which will be fundamental to a new way of providing healthcare.

“ARCH includes a strong digital component which seeks to build on the opportunities arising from the City Deal to set the regional infrastructure and approach to support service transformation. We believe they are fundamental to a new way of providing healthcare, and together across the region helping to create financial sustainability and empowering our citizens as well as delivering preventative advice and services to our population.”

Hywel Dda University Health Board chair and ARCH board member Bernardine Rees OBE said: “We are absolutely delighted with the outcome of the City Deal as it opens up so many opportunities for collaborative working which will improve patient experience here in the West.

“It's about collaboration not centralisation. Together working with patients, public and staff we can support both wellness and illness.

 “We welcome this new way of working across the region and as a health board realise the value regional working adds an attractor for new NHS and life science professionals to come and train, work and live here.”

City Deal partners have worked together for over a year to develop and submit a detailed proposal to the Welsh and UK Governments, with 11 specific projects spread across the region.

 

The announcement signalled the start of investment and development on an unprecedented scale. £241million of central government funding, split between the UK and Welsh Government, would be added to £360million of other public sector funding and £673million of private sector contributions to make up the total investment package.

Professor Marc Clement, ARCH board member and Swansea University’s Vice-President and Dean of School of Management, was part of the City Deal team who put the bid together. He said: “This City Deal will accelerate ARCH’s plans for Morriston and Singleton to become world-class health science campuses.

“The plans for Morriston include South Wales's third Institute of Life Science (ILS), creating a unique health & life science innovation environment.

“This City Deal will allow the ARCH partnership to tap into the decade of success delivered through Swansea University’s ILS. Morriston will become an environment where health & life science innovation can be encouraged, proven, embedded and taken to regional, national and global marketplaces.

 

“The reconfiguration of real estate within ABM University Health Board will facilitate expansion of Singleton Hospital and university campus into a second health science campus where a growing cluster of medical and other health technology companies and collaborations will be focused.”

 

The Singleton Health Campus will see the establishment of Swansea University’s Healthcare Technology Centre - a core component of the ARCH science park vision for Singleton. This second health campus will create significant new employment within high GVA sectors, the campuses will have complementary focus on technology and clinical innovation, supporting development across a broad range of technology readiness levels.

 

Professor Clement added: “The City Deal offers this region a huge opportunity to lead world-class medical research and capitalise on the growing cluster of innovative life science and healthcare companies in our area.

 

“We want to create an environment where health and life science innovation can be encouraged, proven, embedded and taken to regional, national and global marketplaces.”

Along with the health campus development projects, ARCH is planning to create a regional network of health & wellbeing schemes.  The schemes will ensure people can access the care and support they need in their communities to help reduce demand on a pressurised secondary care system.

The schemes aim to regenerate and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health and wellbeing.

 

Professor Clement added: “£40million of City Deal funding would be dedicated to the first of these schemes – the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village.

“The Carmarthenshire Council-led project in Delta Lakes  will create life science and health employment and investment opportunities. The village will be based around primary and community care facilities, and create an Institute of Life Science for Hywel Dda University Health Board, as well as education and skills development capability, and sport, leisure and tourism facilities.

“The village will see the integration of business development, education, wellness initiatives, research and development and healthcare.

“By working together we know we can create a region which can attract new partnerships, new investment and become a leader in life science innovation and research.”

Masterplan funding announced for Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village

Welsh Government announces it will fund the Masterplan for the ARCH and Carmarthenshire Council Delta Lakes Wellness and Life Science project.

PLANS for a unique Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire are pushing forward.

Welsh Government announces it will fund the Masterplan for the ARCH and Carmarthenshire Council Delta Lakes Wellness and Life Science project. Welsh Government has also agreed to vary the terms of the Llanelli Coast Joint Venture agreement with Carmarthenshire Council to formally include the proposed development, subject to an agreed business plan.

The Wellness and Life Science Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellbeing – partnering first-class health, research and life science, with innovative leisure opportunities to help people live healthy lives.

The proposed multi-million pound development earmarked for Delta Lakes is being led by Carmarthenshire Council. It forms part of the ARCH initiative being taken forward by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda Health Boards and Swansea University. It is also one of the projects highlighted in the Swansea Bay City Region City Deal document.

The Masterplan study will build on the feasibility study that is currently being undertaken.

 

Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Economy Ken Skates said: “The Wellness and Life Science Village is an innovative proposal with the potential to make an impact on the health and well being of residents. It is also designed to boost the region’s economy and skills base in a sustainable way while supporting the regeneration of the area. I am pleased to announce funding for a masterplan and associated business case to take the project forward.”

 

Carmarthenshire councillor Meryl Gravell, chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, said: “This scheme is really making progress, the appointment of the project manager and the funding for the feasibility study are significant steps in this development.

“It is an ambitious and unique scheme, which will not only be aimed at improving the health and well-being of people across the region, but will also boost the economy and provide high quality jobs.”

This project is a first for the country and brings together health, science and enterprise to regenerate the area and also help people live healthier lives for longer.

The project concept was derived last year from work undertaken by under ARCH alongside Carmarthenshire Council. The village could see lifestyle and leisure facilities, primary and community-based healthcare and specialist residential care integrated with university research and education space. There will also be business facilities to encourage economic growth.

A feasibility study, funded by the Welsh Government, is currently being carried out for the scheme at Delta Lakes. The site, adjacent to the coastline, has been chosen as the perfect place to deliver the project, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs.

The concept of a Wellness and Life Science Village followed talks on plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli and the council’s desire to work collaboratively with health partners, putting additional investment into facilities and services to help prevent ill-health and reduce pressure on frontline health care.

New project team appointed to drive forward Wellness & Life Science Village

The project, which is estimated to cost in excess of £100million, is being delivered through the work of the Swansea Bay City Region and ARCH partnership, will be sited at Llanelli’s Delta Lakes.

A NEW project team has been appointed to drive forward plans for the unique Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire.

The project, which is estimated to cost in excess of £100million, is being delivered through the work of the Swansea Bay City Region and ARCH partnership, will be sited at Llanelli’s Delta Lakes.

Work has begun to detail what will be included at the site, elements which may be included are a wellness-based leisure centre, hydrotherapy pool, research facilities, a Health & Wellbeing Centre, hotel and conferencing and high spec business facilities and a Health and Wellbeing Academy. 

The new team tasked with delivering the vision are all Carmarthenshire residents. Project manager Dr Sharon Burford, lives with her husband in Mynyddygarreg and works for Hywel Dda Health Board. Dr Burford will be  supported by Steffan Jenkins, from Llangennech, and Bjorn Rodde, who lives in Llwynhendy.

Sharon, who was the management lead for the development of the new model of care in Prince Philip Hospital, said: “I feel the focus on improving health and wellbeing in this area has the potential to make a real difference.

“By working in partnership we now have the opportunity to bring together the right partners to help create the right environment for health innovation to flourish alongside private and public sector partners.

“We also want to challenge our view of healthcare by focusing on wellness and not on illness. This unique approach will allow us to  take the lead in innovative thinking around improving wellness.”

Steffan, who was born a few miles from the Delta Lakes site in Pontiets, now lives  in Llangennech with his wife and twin daughters. A qualified engineer, chartered surveyor and environmental manager, he has worked for Carmarthenshire Council for the past 12 years in its economic development division, on major projects such as the largest land reclamation project in the UK – the hugely successful Millennium Coastal Park.

Steffan said: “To be involved in this new venture is a fantastic opportunity and a challenge I am delighted to be a part of.

“It will be without doubt a truly transformational project for the area and for the people of Llanelli and the region. In fact, it will be a project of national significance, a once in a lifetime project which will without question benefit many generations to come.”  

Bjorn, who lives in Llwynhendy with his wife and two daughters, worked for the past three years as a senior lecturer for Swansea University in the Medical School and the School of Management, and has also spent the last 18 months as a senior project manager on the ARCH programme.

Bjorn added:  “The impact it will have on Llanelli is huge,” he said. “The best thing about this project is the joint ambition - no one is forcing us to do this; it is a fantastic vision and all the partners are fully on board with what we are trying to achieve.

“ARCH’s vision is to encourage collaboration to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales, the Delta Lake project is an early indication of what can be achieved by working in partnership.”

 

What is a Wellness and Life Science Village?

This project is a first for the country and brings together health, science and enterprise to regenerate the area and also help people live healthier lives for longer.

The project concept was derived last year from work undertaken by under ARCH alongside Carmarthenshire Council. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. By coming together the three organisations are aiming to transform the way healthcare is delivered in South West Wales. ARCH brings together the health service and innovation and research to find a new way of meeting the challenges the NHS faces.

The village could see lifestyle and leisure facilities, primary and community-based healthcare and specialist residential care integrated with university research and education space. There will also be business facilities to encourage economic growth.

A feasibility study, funded by the Welsh Government, is currently being carried out for the scheme at Delta Lakes. The site, adjacent to the coastline, has been chosen as the perfect place to deliver the project, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs.

Unique to Wales, the Wellness and Life Science Village was cited in the Swansea Bay City Region’s City Deal bid to the UK Government and noted in the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Spring Budget.

 

View footage of the site:

 

An aerial view of the site can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8iNZH5r8Os It includes footage of the coastline and neighbouring areas, giving a clear view of the Delta Lakes site and where it sits within the surrounding environment.

 

ARCH Festival of Innovation event gets new Economy Minister’s seal of approval

As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.

Innovation is changing the way we live and South West Wales is proving to be leading innovation in health and life sciences.

As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.

ARCH (Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. The ARCH partners are bringing together health and science to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales and  transform the way healthcare is delivered.

Innovation is one of the cornerstones of ARCH’s aims.

To celebrate ARCH’s revolutionary approach, and to showcase the innovation driving this work, there is a free Festival of Innovation event being held at Swansea University’s Singleton Campus later this month.

Swansea University’s Head of the College of Human and Health Science, Professor Ceri Phillips, who is also a member of the ARCH Programme Board, said: “ARCH is bringing together health and science to transform the NHS in this region. We are also working together to train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders, and also help the local economy to thrive by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

“The ARCH partners are collaborating to create a new image of healthcare provision.  This free event brings together leading experts to showcase what's coming next, and how the region and indeed Wales is leading the way in crafting a new health and social care system that is fit for the needs of the 21st century. 

“Our aim is simple, we want to showcase what this region has to offer. We have so many talented people leading the way through innovation, through our first class academia for education and training, for research and development and for developing innovative that will contribute to the establishment and development of new models for health and wellbeing.”

The Festival, which has events taking place across Wales between June 20 and July 1, is designed to provide the public with the rare opportunity to view first-hand how Wales is at the forefront of enabling technologies which underpin key industry sectors.

Welsh Government Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Ken Skates added: “The festival aims to support the exchange of ideas and concepts which could create collaborations and inspire a new generation of innovative products, solutions and cultural endeavours.

“We are delighted the innovative ARCH partnership is providing a free day full of amazing innovation and research by bringing together an impressive line up of speakers who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in Wales.”

Topics covered during the day on Wednesday, June 29, will include the revolutionary area of Precision Medicine which is transforming the way cancer is treated, an insight into ground-breaking research taking place at Swansea University in brain science which could see an end to low moods caused by stress and innovation taking place around autism and diabetes.

Leighton Phillips, Swansea University’s advisor on health, added: “There will be the opportunity to discuss the innovation taking place with these leading experts in their field and network with these innovators.

Collaboration, underpinned by academic innovation and excellence, is vital if we are to fundamentally change the health of our region and how their healthcare is delivered. This event will give people the chance to speak directly to those people in this transformation.”

The ARCH Festival of Innovation day takes place on Wednesday, June 29, from 8.30am-5pm at the Seminar Room at ILS1 on Singleton Campus. You can attend the whole day or the session which interest you most. To register for the free event visit www.eventbrite.co.uk and search A Regional Collaboration for Health. For other festival of Innovation events taking place visit www.festivalofinnovation.org

‘We can be global leader in clinical trials & transform patient’s lives’

Why are clinical trials so important?

269 years ago the first ever clinical trial was carried out, looking into the link between vitamin C and scurvy. Since then clinical trials have developed into a vital tool for healthcare. To celebrate the importance of James Lind’s pioneering work, each year on May 20 International Clinical Trials Day is held.

Lind's experiments in 1747 were run under very different conditions to today. He was serving as a surgeon on HMS Salisbury. His trial consisted of just 12 men, grouped into pairs and given a variety of dietary supplements from cider to oranges and lemons. The trial only lasted six days but, within that time, there was a noticeable improvement in the group eating the fruit, providing Lind with evidence of the link between citrus fruits and scurvy. Now almost 300 years after this breakthrough work, why is research in healthcare still so important and how does it benefit patients today?

A clinical trial is a type of clinical research that compares one treatment with another. It may involve patients or healthy people, or both. Small studies produce less reliable results than large ones, so studies often have to be carried out on a large number of people before the results are considered sufficiently reliable.

Doctors and other healthcare professionals and patients need evidence from clinical trials to know which treatments work best. Without this evidence, there is a risk that people could be given treatments that have no advantage, waste NHS resources, and might even be harmful.

Clinical trials help to find out if treatments are safe, if they have any side effects and if new treatments are better than the standard available treatments.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU Health Board’s Assistant Medical Director (Research and Development), says International Clinical Trials Day is a great way to help people understand the importance of this type of research work.

Professor Bain said: “International Clinical Trials Day is a great opportunity to celebrate the crucial role of research and clinical trials to the NHS.  From paracetamol and chemotherapy to treatments for depression and diabetes -without research, many of the treatments and types of care that we receive today just wouldn’t be available.

“And members of the public have an essential role to play, since without people agreeing to take part in research studies these improved treatments and care wouldn’t exist.”

And South West Wales’s reputation for clinical research excellence is growing through the ambitious aims of the ARCH Programme. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health), is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards.

Through ARCH, there are plans to expand the clinical trials and research activity across the entire region of South West Wales. The Joint Clinical Research Facility (J-CRF), which is currently shared by Swansea University and ABMU health board, undertakes patient research and serves a population of 500,000. Through the ARCH partnership, this benefit will extend to almost 1 million people.

Professor Bain explains: “Through the ambitions of ARCH, our patients and staff can gain great benefits from an expanded clinical research environment. We have existing J-CRF activity at Singleton, Morriston and Prince Philip hospitals, but through the collaborative approach of ARCH, we now have plans to expand this activity across the entire region.

“The J-CRF provides an important platform for translation of research into clinical innovation for meaningful patient benefit. This expansion will all us to undertake a broader and much larger portfolio of projects ranging from pharmaceutical to medical device innovation.

“What makes the ARCH region special is its unusually stable population of around a million people, many with chronic illnesses which plague the modern world such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This combination is potentially a huge draw for research and development companies, meaning that as well as the benefits to the NHS, in terms of better availability of leading technologies and therapies, the expansion will boost economic growth through potential investment from industry partners.

“We will be able to maximise the potential of the 1 million ARCH population to position this region, and indeed Wales, as a leader in championing clinical research within the NHS.”

Professor Bain added that Swansea already has a good track record of working with new drugs for treating diabetes: “We already see ourselves as a leading centre and already attract work from global pharmaceutical companies. Hopefully, the development of ARCH will lead to an upscaling of our activities so we can become a major player in the global search for new medicines.

“Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, ARCH gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales.  If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy.”

The J-CRF in Swansea was established in 1990 and has a team of highly trained research nursing staff and an excellent track record for recruitment and randomisation. Kathie Wareham, director of clinical research at J-CRF, said: “We are fortunate here in South West Wales to have vibrant research departments which allows our patients participate in the development of future medicines and devices.

“Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the university’s medical school, they save the NHS money because the medicines are provided free by the companies trying to license them. Having people on these trials also frees up places within hospitals so NHS patients can be treated more quickly.”

Dr Phil Kloer, Hywel Dda’s medical director and ARCH lead, explains how valuable this sort of work is to the NHS in terms of treatments but also how they can help people stay well without medical intervention. Dr Kloer said: “Clinical trials can help us learn how to prevent illnesses by testing a vaccine for example, detect or diagnose illnesses by testing a scan or blood test, treat illnesses by testing new or existing medicines, find out how best to provide psychological support and also importantly help find out how people can control their symptoms or improve their quality of life – for example, by testing how a particular diet or activity affects a condition.”

But Dr Kloer also stressed the rigorous protocols around clinical trials to ensure safety is paramount at all times: “Trials follow a set of rules, known as a protocol, to ensure they are well designed and as safe as possible, they measure the right things in the right way, and the results are meaningful. All trials are closely monitored.”

Clinical research is funded through a number of routes, Welsh Government funds research in Wales through Health and Care Research Wales and each health board has a budget for R&D. Dr Jon Bisson, director of Health and Care Research Wales, said Wales has a huge role to play in delivering clinical trials research.

Dr Bisson said: “Clinical Trials Units offer expertise in specialist trial design, conduct and analysis to researchers in Wales and beyond. They facilitate high-quality, timely and successful trial conduct and ensure regulatory and governance requirements are met.

“Through Health and Care Research Wales, the Welsh Government is investing in Clinical Trials Units including Swansea Trials Unit (STU). International Clinical Trials Day is a great way to showcase the work going on here in Wales.”

Swansea Trials Unit (STU), which is based at Swansea University’s Medical School on the Singleton Campus, works closely with researchers rather than the industry & patient facing work carried out at J-CRF.  The Swansea unit has run nearly 40 trials valued at more than £20 million.

STU manager Gail Holland added: “We aim to improve the health of the people of South West Wales and beyond by enhancing the number, progress and quality of trials, with particular reference to secondary and emergency care.

“Thanks to funding from Health and Care Research Wales we are able to provide training to build capacity in clinical trials. We also offer advice and support for trial design, regulation, recruitment, data collection, management and analysis.”

Dr Bisson added: “We want more people to understand the value and importance of clinical trials and research and hopefully they will consider taking part. Without members of the public taking part in research, improvements to treatments and care cannot be made.

“By taking part in a research study, you could benefit future generations and play a really important role in medical progress.”

To find out more about clinical trials you can attend Health and Care Research Wales’s free event at Swansea’s Waterfront Museum on Friday, May 20 from 12pm to 2pm to mark International Clinical Trials Day.

Clinical trials provide a healthy living for Swansea taxi driver

A Swansea cabbie’s livelihood is certainly in good health thanks to clinical trials taking place in the city.

Self-employed Dave Thompson is kept so busy ferrying patients around he doesn’t just making a living out of it – he gives other drivers a helping hand by putting work their way too.

Clinical trials, or research studies, are carried out in a partnership between ABMU Health Board and Swansea University Medical School.

They involve new medicines or devices that are being licensed and are trialled on patients, who have agreed to take part, to determine whether they are safe and more effective than current treatments.

Pharmaceutical companies pay for these trials as well as associated costs, such as transport for patients.

When Dave first got involved eight years ago, it was worth a few hundred pounds a month to him. Now it generates ten times that.

He said: “It started when the driver they were using was ill this particular day and I got the call asking if I would like to do a job.

“I said yes – it was certainly better than having to work nights with all the drunks around – and that was the start of it. I haven’t looked back.

“I take people for clinical research in Singleton or Morriston, picking them up from home and taking them back again afterwards.

“We have around 25 patients a week. It’s so busy I’ve had to take some other drivers on. They’re self-employed and do the work for me. They’re landed because it means work for them.

“My son is a self-employed driver and he helps me occasionally too. Business is really thriving.

“I work hard and I have overheads to pay but I’m far better off than I would be working for another company.”

Most of the work is in the southwest Wales region, but Dave has had to make occasional trips to England, including Gloucester and Darlington.

Clinical trials take place simultaneously in UK and overseas centres. As they involve regular meetings between the lead investigating officers from each centre, Dave often makes airport journeys too.

Professor Steve Bain (left), ABMU’s Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development, said the trials involved a significant financial commitment on the part of pharmaceutical companies.

Professor Bain said: “They don’t want people dropping out of these trials because they have difficulty getting to the hospital or have problems parking.

“So taxi companies are paid by the companies to be there on time.

“Patients are brought in, see the clinical staff, and are taken home again. It’s to make life as simple as possible for them.”

Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the medical school they actually save the NHS money.

Professor Bain said: “There are cost-saving elements for the NHS during these trials because the medicines are all given by the companies that are trying to license them.

“With diabetic patients, for example, they don’t need to go to the diabetes centres while they are in the trial, which then opens up space for other people.”

ABMU, Swansea University and Hywel Dda have embarked on the Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) project to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

As research and development is an important part of this, it creates the potential for a significant increase in clinical trials in the ABMU and Hywel Dda areas – with all the health and economic benefits that would bring.

Professor Bain said: “Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, Arch gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales.

“All these trials are closely monitored and we have people visiting on a weekly basis to keep tabs on them.

“If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy.”

Meanwhile, Dave is in absolutely no doubt about the benefits of clinical trials and not just in terms of his own business.

He said: “I talk to the patients and they think these research projects are wonderful. They feel like they are coming into a private hospital.

“Everybody will benefit if there is more research. It’s great for patients and it creates work for people like me. Everyone wins.”

ARCH is key part of £500m Swansea Bay City Region deal

Internet Coast proposal submitted to Chancellor

THE Swansea Bay City Region has submitted a ground-breaking ‘Internet Coast’ City Deal bid, in excess of £500 million over 20 years, to both the UK and Welsh Governments.

The aim is to address the integrated universal themes and challenges of energy, health and well-being and economic acceleration by harnessing the transformational power of digital networks and the asset base of Swansea Bay. It is estimated that the City Deal investment could lever in total around £3.3bn of output and £1.3bn of gross value added for Wales, while supporting around 39,000 jobs in the region.

Chair of the Swansea Bay City Region Board Sir Terry Matthews said: “Swansea Bay became world famous in ‘the first machine age’. We aim to re-energise a vibrant and pioneering role in Wales and the UK as the world now enters ‘a new digital machine age.’

“There are echoes of the Industrial Revolution in this vision and I am pleased to be leading the region as we aim for a new place in the global economy.  I can clearly see a Swansea Bay that is globally recognised for innovation and economic acceleration once again, ideally located on ‘a digital super highway connecting the UK and North America - London and New York.

 

“Think of the way the internet and broadband networks have transformed communications worldwide. Now imagine the same principle applied to future energy systems, to health and well-being and any number of other sectors. It is a massive opportunity and with City Deal support we can take a lead position in Wales and make our wider contribution to the UK and to Europe.”

“In my letter to the Chancellor I have described the widest possible regional public sector commitment to this City Deal bid as ‘a leap of faith’ that has immense value. I sincerely hope that the bold vision and support is recognised by Government in Westminster and Cardiff Bay. I know also that there are many private sector partners, here in Swansea Bay, across Wales and the UK and around the world who are enthused by our ‘leap of logic’.

“We need to incubate, launch and grow an ecosystem of new, successful and fast growing companies here in Swansea Bay. With the clarity, direction and impetus that a City Deal can provide just watch us ‘move that needle’ to a higher level of growth.”

 As part of the City Region deal, the ARCH health programme is working to address the challenges we face in health and healthcare across the region.  ARCH chairman Professor Andrew Davies, who is also chair of ABMU Health Board and a member of the Swansea Bay City Region Board, explains how the plans will benefit the health and wellbeing of people in South West Wales.

He said: “The City Deal will accelerate the rate at which the ARCH partners can deliver an innovative and pioneering healthcare service in this region. ARCH is working on a regional footprint of one million people - with an effective digital infrastructure in place through the City Region Deal we will be able to really create a new model of pro-active, personalised and co-ordinated healthcare delivery, which will be seen as an exemplar in the NHS.

“Through health science innovation and research, ARCH will also be able to attract highly-qualified people and high growth businesses to South West Wales. With the correct technology and digital platforms in place – supported by the creation of a “digital super highway” we will be able to truly transform the way healthcare is delivered in our communities.

“These are exciting plans which will have real benefit to us all.”

 

Unlocking innovation 'key' to NHS research success

Doctors need to be given freedom to do research alongside clinical work to aid medical advances, according to a pioneering scientist

Dr Kunnathur Rajan led tests in the 1970s into the effects of asbestos on the lungs and smoking-related cancers, reports the BBC.

Swansea University's Medical School Dean Prof Keith Lloyd said the key is to "unlock the innovation" in the NHS.

The Welsh Government has said a "significant minority" of doctors do research and it hopes numbers increase.

Despite time and financial pressures, Dr Rajan said allowing consultants to conduct studies would save the NHS money in the long-run because of any subsequent breakthroughs.

He said: "Doctors can be trained in medicine but that doesn't mean they can do research. It took me seven years [to learn]."

Indian-born Dr Rajan studied at the Christian Medical College, Vellore, and worked at hospitals around England before deciding to broaden his research by doing a PhD at Cambridge University.

While there, he worked with Dame Honor Fell, who is credited with developing the organ culture method, growing living cells in the laboratory so they can be studied.

In 1970, Dr Rajan joined the pneumoconiosis research unit at Cardiff's Llandough Hospital, where he led research looking into the effects of asbestos on the lungs.

To illustrate this, he developed the organ culture method for adult pleura (lining of the lung) and grew a tumour.

The work was seen as a breakthrough and the results published in the Nature journal in 1972.

Other research at the unit included looking at the effects of smoking on human lungs and maintaining pancreas and human brain tissue using the organ culture method.

When this work ended, Dr Rajan took a position as a consultant physician in rheumatology in Rhondda Cynon Taff.

After a visit to the USA for a conference, he was convinced diagnostic equipment to check bone density could help rising cases of people suffering from osteoporosis.

With no funding available in the NHS, he approached local mayor Edie May Evans, who helped raise £60,000. The service is running at Pontypridd's Dewi Sant Hospital.

"I scanned 16,000 patients on the NHS with it and published nearly 100 papers - I found that if you can catch the signs of osteoporosis early and treat it, you can save a lot of money.

"Early intervention can prevent fracture - which also means the quality of life for the patient is better because if they break their hip and have a replacement, it is not the same as having their own."

Dr Rajan described himself as "an eternal student" and said all consultants should carry out research alongside clinical work.

A "significant minority" is currently involved, according to Dr Jon Bisson, director of the Welsh Government's Health and Care Research Wales.

While he believes skills and job pressures make it "unrealistic" that all could carry out regular research, he wants to ensure everyone has a chance.

"We should be playing to individual strengths - some are more interested in research, some have backgrounds that make it more likely for them," he said.

"As we move forward, some will be the key investigators."

Currently, some doctors have a half day a week for research in their contract, while others are able to discuss ring-fencing time with their managers or apply for funding.

Dr Bisson added: "I want to see pockets of excellence that exist grow throughout Wales."

One of these is emerging through a link-up between Swansea University Medical School and the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg (ABMU) and Hywel Dda health boards.

Under the banner of A Regional Collaboration for Health (ARCH), it aims to develop more opportunities for healthcare research work. This will not be the route for all consultants though, said Prof Keith Lloyd, dean of the medical school.

While he said an "understanding of how to appraise evidence and understand research" is a core skill for all doctors, not all will be involved on an ongoing basis.

Some will instead focus on things like teaching and management alongside their clinical work.

However, he believes ARCH has the potential to "unlock the innovation" in the NHS.

“There are many things a consultant can do in addition to clinical work, specifically research, learning and teaching, innovation and management. Each is equally important.  

“An understanding of how to appraise evidence and understand research is a core skill for all doctors. But not all doctors need to do research on an ongoing basis.

“In terms of conflicts of interest, there is always the need to be transparent, and that is what ethics committees and research governance are in place for.

“Research is funded through a number of routes, such as Health and Care Research Wales, which is part of Welsh Government and each health board has a budget for R&D. Many other bodies fund health and life sciences research for example the research councils  and charities such as the Wellcome, Cancer Research UK and the British Heart foundation for example.

“The ARCH partners are incredibly lucky to have ABMU and Hywel Dda R&D directors of the highest calibre - in Professor Steve Bain and Dr Keir Lewis.

“The ARCH Programme is investing in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. As part of ARCH, the Medical School, through its research and innovation arm at the Institute of Life Science (ILS) is currently developing a strategy for Intellectual Property (IP) harmonisation and commercialisation.

“This strategy will help unlock the innovation within the NHS and also give NHS staff a framework to help bring their innovation to life and support them to deliver that innovation to deliver real benefits to patients.” added: “ARCH is working with Welsh Government to further strengthen the support available to our clinicians and other health professionals to undertake research and innovation work.

“This includes a number of exciting initiatives which build upon work at Swansea University Medical School’s ILS, with the aim of taking concepts through to clinical and commercial impact. This will deliver a significant expansion in technical development, clinical research and commercialisation capability allowing colleagues across the NHS to engage in research and innovation alongside patient care.

“We look forward to launching these plans soon, which will deliver benefit to patients and enterprise across South West Wales and beyond.”

 Professor Steve Bain, Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development for ABMU, said: “Consultants have the choice to use one of their allocated Supporting Professional Activities (SPA) sessions on research.

“Research and development (R&D) within the health boards have funding to support and build capacity through backfill sessions and the employment of research nurses to support consultants. There is also a dedicated R&D budget which is based on the amount of health board research portfolio activity and there is also re-investment from involvement in commercially sponsored clinical research which enables  our consultants to build the resources available to them.

“The Health Boards have partner Clinical Trials Unit which support design methodology and the development of research which also provides dedicated support through trials managers who help support consultants’ workload.

“Welsh Government also run an annual Clinical Fellowship which is made available for consultants to bid to undertake protected time for their research work.”

'ARCH is starting a healthcare revolution in Wales'

ARCH chair Andrew Davies explains the ARCH ambition

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health), is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards.

The ARCH partners are working to bring health and science together to transform the NHS, train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers and scientist and also boost the local economy by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

With the NHS under increased pressure to achieve more with less money, the ARCH collaboration is creating a new image of healthcare provision in South West Wales.

ARCH Chairman Prof Andrew Davies explains the ARCH ambitions:

"ARCH is a truly unique proposition. Nothing of this scale or complexity has been attempted in Wales before. 

Given the size of the ARCH ambition, the progress we are already making is testament to the relationships built up between the three partners. And the significant backing from Welsh Government demonstrates their confidence, and belief, in the ARCH ethos and its work.

A Regional Collaboration for Health is bringing together health and science to transform the NHS as we know it in this region. The challenges facing the NHS across the UK are well documented and discussed, we are all under increased pressure to achieve more with less.

ARCH is starting a revolution in healthcare in Wales, and we believe it is a revolution which is replicable across the whole of the NHS.

ARCH has come about as a result of ABMU, Hywel Dda and Swansea University getting our heads together, and reimagining how healthcare needs to work for the people within the communities we serve. Rather than attempting to continue to work in an unworkable way to patch up healthcare provision, ARCH is striving to do it all differently.

ARCH is a bridge between health and wellbeing. It will link services, invest in facilities, develop new strategies and support the people in our region. Building on our existing relationships, the ARCH partnership allows us  to work with a regional focus. The ARCH region covers a population of 1 million people and covers 6 local authority areas – the potential to shape health, healthcare and our economy is huge.

We are also working to train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders as well also help drive the local economy by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs. ARCH will also invest in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. We will also unlock the innovation which exists the NHS to help deliver real patient benefits.

We want to create world-class medical facilities, greatly improve and expand existing health and wellbeing facilities, develop and improve social approaches which can prevent health problems from developing, and enable those who are living with issues to better manage, and thus enjoy improved outcomes.

ARCH focuses on the wellbeing of the communities it serves – with health being just a single factor of that focus.

Ultimately, our ambition is to improve the lives of the people of South West Wales, because with improved health comes greater overall wellbeing, which has a positive influence on economic factors, which in turn serves to improve the entire area in a sustainable way for the future.

Investment in services and research will also bring jobs and money to this corner of Wales sooner rather than later. This again has a positive knock on effect for the entire area in terms of providing opportunity."

Swansea University Medical School Dean Keith Lloyd's Health Column

The Medical School is proud to have a close, productive and effective relationship with our health boards.

The Medical School is proud to have a close, productive and effective relationship with our health boards.

As a school we are educating and training tomorrow’s doctors and life scientists but also helping to deliver real healthcare improvements for patients today through research and collaboration.

This collaborative approach is being maximised by the ARCH Partnership. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique programme made up of Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and aims to bring health and science together to transform the NHS in this region, train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders and also help the local economy to thrive by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

The challenges facing the NHS across the UK are well documented and discussed in the media. The NHS is under increased pressure to achieve more with less money.

The ARCH partners are working together create a new image of healthcare provision in this area. ARCH truly is revolutionary in terms of its approach to creating a synergy between health and holistic wellbeing and economic regeneration.

The university and health boards have chosen to collaborate, and create an innovative and fresh way forward for the provision of healthcare and health and wellbeing services for the population of South West Wales.

As a school, through ARCH, we will build on our existing relationships with ABMU and developing our work with Hywel Dda University health Board. This partnership allows the Medical School to work with a regional focus. The ARCH Programme covers a population of 1 million people and involves 6 local authority areas – nothing of this scale or complexity has been attempted in Wales before.

ARCH will also invest in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. As part of ARCH, the Medical School is developing a strategy for Intellectual property (IP) harmonisation and commercialisation. What does this mean to the NHS and the people it cares for? This strategy will help unlock the innovation within the NHS and also give our NHS staff a framework to help bring their innovation to life and support them to deliver that innovation to deliver real benefits to patients.

The Medical School is holding a free information day on April 23 from 10am to 12pm on our Postgraduate part-time courses. This is a great opportunity for NHS staff to find out more about how they can develop their skills base and learning.

I would encourage our NHS workforce in South West Wales  to come along and find out about part time study opportunities which could really enhance their own development and the care they deliver to our patients.

Collaborate 2016

Collaborate 2016 is back and building on the success of last year’s event

Collaborate 2016 is back and building on the success of last year’s event. The life science-focused day will be once again dedicated to celebrating and promoting collaborative projects and partnerships across industry, academia, Government, health boards and other organisations.

Bringing together more than 300 representatives from across the region and beyond, the event will be hosted by the Swansea University Medical School’s Enterprise and Innovation Team, AHSC, ABMU and Hywel Dda University Health Boards as part of the ARCH Partnership.

Collaborate 2016 takes place on October 19, 8:15am - 4:45pm at Swansea University's Singleton Campus.

Alongside the event’s high profile speakers, there will also be a series of thematic workshops, tours of ILS facilities and opportunity for attendees to network for further collaboration.

 

Have Swansea University academics got the solution to bad moods and feeling stressed?

Brain scientists and psychologists at Swansea University are developing a new technique which can reduce the impact of stress on mood and help improve your emotional wellbeing

Everyone experiences emotional ups and downs. Life today is fraught with many stressful situations which can lead to irritability, stress, agitation and moodiness.

But brain scientists and psychologists at Swansea University are developing a new technique which can reduce the impact of stress on mood and help improve your emotional wellbeing.

Dr Frederic Boy, who works at both the College of Human and Health Science and the School of Management at the university, is leading the research. And his work is already receiving international interest in the short period since his paper was published in scientific journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Dr Boy, who is originally from Provence and has lived in Swansea for the past four years, said: “When facing stressful events, the frontal regions of the brain are particularly active and constantly appraise the positive or negative emotions which are generated, and that will, in turn, shape how we react to situations.

“Over time, the negative impact of stressors build up and the physical and emotional wellbeing may be compromised. We asked ourselves - can the impact of stress on the brain of a non-depressed individual be reduced?”

Dr Boy, along with fellow academic Sian Roderick, also from Swansea, have developed new brain science research employing weak electrical impulses to stimulate the frontal cortex by placing  electrodes on the top of the head.

And if this sounds like a intimidating process, Sian says the technique is actually very simple and the stimulation is very subtle. She said: “We don’t want anyone to think this is like electrical treatments used in the past. The volunteers were all very relaxed with the process and the stimulation lasts for a very short period and feels like a much weaker version of a TENS machine, for example.”

Dr Boy added: “Advances in transcranial electrical stimulation techniques mean we are able to investigate different clinical and non-clinical people and specific areas of the human brain and see how those regions regulate people’s behaviour.

“What was clear is that the way people behave results from a complex interaction between a number of genetic, social and environmental factors.”

The scientists studied 66 healthy young women, with no history of psychiatric disorders or substance dependence. The volunteers filled in questionnaires, which helped assess different aspects of their current mood, the building bricks of the emotional and physical wellbeing. They underwent a course of 12 min-a-day brain electrical stimulations sessions for five days. A total of 22 individuals received an ineffective, but realistic, placebo stimulation, while the 44 others were administered a real, active stimulation.

Dr Boy explains: “This technique employs electrical power that is more than a thousand times lower than the one used by an energy saving light bulb, and result in a feeble tingling lasting a few seconds in the first instants of the stimulation session.”

Over the duration of the research, the team found that those volunteers who received the active stimulation gradually reported having experienced less negative mood states in the past day. On the contrary, participants in the placebo group did not report notable changes in mood.

“This type of treatment has been accredited by the NHS to be used to treat depression last August. We have shown that weak electric stimulation is also effective to improve the mood of  those who are not depressed, but are still affected by the consequence of a stressful, restless and demanding lifestyle,” added Dr Boy, who is Head of Translational and Consumer Neuroscience in the Department of Psychology.

“This technique is based on robust scientific research and we hope it will be developed to create an over-the-counter device which can be used to improve mood and lower stress.”

With the recent statistics showing that more and more young people, are turning to medicating their emotional wellbeing - the number of young people in the UK prescribed anti-depressants increased by more than 50% between 2005 and 2012, according to the new study – could Dr Boy’s research lead to a reduction in this worrying trend?

“Yes, we are hopeful this research can assist in the treatment of low mood without having to resort to medication.

“As well as the possible side effects this type of treatment can have on the patient, prescribing drugs in the first instance is a huge drain on the NHS. We are aiming to align our work with the Prudent Healthcare agenda set out by the Health Minister.

“As a university we are excited to be part of ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health).

“The ARCH partners are working to use innovation and research to drive health service improvements and we believe this research could be a part of this transformational approach.

“We hope that in developing a device which people can choose to use we are also empowering the population to take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing.”

Dr Boy and Sian Roderick are both directors of the emerging life science firm Neurotheraputics, and are hopeful their research can be developed by West Wales medical devices firm Magstim.

The Whitland-based company, who pioneer and manufacture non-invasive magnetic stimulation devices, say they are excited by the research.

Charles Hounsell, Magstim product specialist, said: “Magstim is delighted to explore opportunities with Swansea University to expand our understanding of therapeutic techniques using neurostimulation devices.

“The field of non-invasive brain stimulation is expanding rapidly and we are hugely excited about the potential benefits of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). We look forward to discussing this research further with Dr Boy and his team.”

And Magstim are not the only people who have taken a keen interest in the research. Dr Boy’s paper has been viewed across the globe with several hits on his online paper coming from the Whitehouse.

The interest into this work has been overwhelming,” said Dr Boy. “We have had views from Silicon Valley, New York and Washington.

“It makes sense though - I am sure life at the Whitehouse gets very stressful,” jokes Dr Boy.

But not to make light of the possible impact this research could have on improving people’s lives, Dr Boy adds: “This is of global significance. This could absolutely change people’s lives.

We are starting further research on whether this form of brain stimulation could also provide relief in ailments such as low back pain or migraine.”

Professor Ceri Phillips, Head of the College of Human and Health Science and ARCH board member, said Dr Boy’s work was a great example of innovation and research being translated to benefit people in South West Wales.

He said: “ARCH is Swansea University working with our two health boards of ABMU and Hywel Dda to innovate new ways of working to improve the healthcare we deliver in this region.

“This type of research could create a complementary therapy which may contribute to relieving the pressures on our GPs, reduce the cost of prescribing drugs and help to support the one million people in the ARCH region in taking responsibility for their own health, wellness and wellbeing.

“The new Health and Wellbeing Academy which will open on the Singleton Health Campus in September has the same aims. We want to provide treatments which will improve wellness and also help to alleviate the pressure on our primary care services.

“We look forward to developing Dr Boy’s work.”

 

To read Dr Boy’s paper visit: www.journal.frontiersin.org

Surgeon’s pioneering infection research is honoured with “highest accolade”

Ernest Azzopardi, a Swansea surgeon has been awarded one of his profession’s highest accolades for his research

A SWANSEA surgeon who has been awarded one of his profession’s highest accolades for his research has praised the innovation and collaboration currently taking place in South West Wales.

Ernest Azzopardi, who divides his time between ABMU’s Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery and Swansea University’s Medical School, is pioneering research into burn and surgical infection.

Dr Azzopardi has received the coveted Hunterian Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in England. The award is given to a body of work which will lead to substantial clinical change in the way patients are treated.

And Dr Azzopardi says the region’s unique approach to combining health and science through the ARCH Programme is helping to not only foster a real spirit of innovation in the NHS but will also lead to breakthroughs in the way patients are treated.

Dr Azzopardi said: “ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique project. I am honoured to be part of such a transformative approach to solving healthcare challenges.

“By working so closely with the University, the two ARCH health boards are uniquely placed to make major breakthroughs in how we improve the care given to our patients.

“Infection is a major challenge for the NHS. I do believe that through this collaboration between health and science - it is a challenge we will win.”

Dr Azzopardi, who delivered the Hunterian Oration at the winter meeting of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), added: “Swansea is leading international research which can, and will, change lives.

“I am delighted to have received the Hunterian Medal – it is an international award which is open to all clinicians, not just surgeons, so I was very proud to receive it.

“I am fortunate in receiving so much support from both Swansea University Medical School and its research arm, the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and within the Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery at Morriston.

“I am also inspired by the dedication of colleagues at the Burns Centre, which receives major burns from all over the UK.”

Dr Azzopardi’s cross-theme research, which focuses on precision medicine, microbiology, nanobiotechnology and clinical surgery, has been recognised by several other awards.

He is the only Hunterian Award recipient to have also been awarded the BAPRAS President’s Medal and, for earlier works, the James Syme Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh and the T Jackson Prize from the UK British Burns Association.

Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. While some advances in precision medicine have been made, the ARCH partners of Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards are working hard to ensure it is part of the healthcare of the future.

Dr Azzopardi added: “I am honoured to be part of the ARCH collaboration which has helped make my research work possible.

“ARCH is a complex project but by bringing research excellence into the NHS arena we will be able to deliver healthcare which is faster, better and cheaper.”

 

ABMU Executive Medical Director and ARCH board member Hamish Laing has praised Dr Azzopardi’s pioneering research and explains what precision medicine will mean to patients. He said: In the past there has been an intuitive approach towards diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine brings together research, new tools and techniques to allow for a faster and more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan, personalised for the patient.

"The main aim of this approach is to provide the right drug at the right dose to the right patient at the right time.

“Infection is a major concern in surgery and especially following severe burns. I am delighted that Dr Azzopardi is leading the way in infection research and its translation into real patient benefit. This award is thoroughly deserved.

“His research work really could be a global breakthrough for infection control.”

Dr Azzopardi’s research has been supported by the Welsh Government’s Welsh Clinical Academic Track (WCAT) initiative, which integrates clinical training with academic progression and he is the first WCAT fellow in plastic surgery.

He began his post-doctoral research at Swansea University in 2013 within the reconstructive surgery and regenerative medicine group led by Professor Iain Whitaker and was later appointed honorary senior clinical lecturer.

Professor Whitaker said the Hunterian award was a great achievement, in addition to previous recognition of Dr Azzopardi’s work. He said: The multidisciplinary nature of the research is a good example of the ARCH aims.

“Dr Azzopardi’s research showcases how the Medical School is working closely with our two health boards in areas of shared strength and expertise to really benefit our patients.”

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean of the Medical School and ARCH board member added: “The Medical School is one of the UK’s top performers for its research quality and research environment  so we are delighted to see Dr Azzopardi set such a high standard with his work.

“We congratulate Ernest and look forward to seeing his continued work benefit patients across the entire ARCH region of South West Wales and beyond.”

Economy Minister visits Llanelli to drive forward multi-million pound Wellness & Life Science Village

Multi-million pound Carmarthenshire Council-led project will be the first of its kind and is being developed through ARCH

DISCUSSIONS are underway between the Welsh Government and Carmarthenshire Council to drive forward plans for a unique Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes in Llanelli.

The multi-million pound Carmarthenshire Council-led project will be the first of its kind and is being developed through ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) – a unique partnership between  ABMU and Hywel Dda Health Boards and Swansea University.

ARCH provides a new model for delivering healthcare specifically planned for today’s increasingly complex needs.

 The Wellness and Life Science Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellbeing – partnering first-class health, research and life science, with innovative leisure opportunities to help people live healthy lives.

 

Economy Minister Edwina Hart met representatives from ARCH and the council on a visit to the proposed site at Delta Lakes.  The Minister updated the group and said discussions were underway between the Welsh Government and the council to extend an existing Joint Venture agreement to facilitate the delivery of the Village, subject to an agreed business plan.

 

The Minister said: “These are exciting plans and form an integral part of the ARCH initiative that aims to improve the quality of health care and also boost the region’s economy and skills base in a sustainable way.

“We are currently discussing provisions to allow this innovative development to happen.”

 

The concept of a Wellness and Life Science Village followed talks on plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli and the council’s desire to work collaboratively with health partners, putting additional investment into facilities and services to help prevent ill-health and reduce pressure on front-line health care.

Scoping work to fine-tune details of the pioneering scheme is underway, with potential to include a state-of-the-art wellness and leisure centre, and life science and research facilities, as well as the possibility of a hotel, conferencing and high-spec business suites. 

Partners have now signed a Memorandum of Understanding to develop the project.

 

Councillorr Meryl Gravell, Executive Board Member for regeneration and Chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, said: “The Wellness and Life Science Village will lead the way in transforming wellbeing services, focusing on preventative health care.

“We want to deliver cutting-edge wellness, care and research facilities here in Llanelli, and regenerate a prime location on Carmarthenshire’s coast.”

 

Hywel Dda’s Executive lead for ARCH, Professor Kathryn Davies, said: “This project shows the importance of a collabora­tive approach between all sectors. To achieve a real step-change in the health of our communities, we must understand the impact wellness has on all areas and sectors - medi­cine, research, education, sport, community public health hospitality, business and commerce.”

 

ARCH board member and ABMU Director of Strategy Sian Harrop-Griffiths, who was at the recent ministerial visit to Delta Lakes, added: “Through ARCH we are working to provide health care for patients in a community-based setting, which will help divert them from entering secondary care and help ease the pressure on our hospitals.

We want people to access services based on informed choice, prevention, diagnosis and self-care rather than heading straight to their GP or Emergency Departments.”

 

The Minister was joined on the site visit by Council Leader Cllr Emlyn Dole; Cllr Meryl Gravell, Julie James, Independent Board Member of Hywel Dda University Health Board; Mark Clement, Vice President of Swansea University and Dean of the School of Management; and ABMU’s Sian Harrop-Griffiths.

 

Thriving life science firms in Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science praised by Minister

Edwina Hart met with firms based at the Medical School’s Institute of Life Science (ILS) after announcing Wales has attracted £50million of investment

Economy Minister Edwina Hart has praised the growing life science sector in South West Wales during a visit of Swansea University.

Edwina Hart met with firms based at the Medical School’s Institute of Life Science (ILS) after announcing Wales has attracted £50million of investment from to support innovation and economic growth.

The Minister chose to visit the ILS to mark the record investment figures and met with several highly innovative, technology driven companies who are based at the Singleton Health Campus.

The investment from Innovate UK in the current financial year – is a record figure and brings the total committed to over £100million during the Welsh Government’s current term of office

The ILS-based firms have successfully leveraged over £3million in Innovate UK funding, as well as benefitting from Welsh Government support. 

The Minister, who was guided around the Medical School’s ILS by Professor Keith Lloyd and the Centre for Nanohealth by Professor Steve Conlan, said: Innovation Wales emphasised the need to improve collaboration between businesses, academia and others looking to access UK and EU funding streams.

 “Today’s record figures clearly illustrate that this message is getting across and delivering results. In total more than 530 projects have benefited from £50million of Innovate UK funding during the Welsh Government’s current term in office.

“Many of these are SMEs and spin-out companies, while the larger successful examples of collaboration in action include the strategically important ‘big ticket’ announcements like the £50m Compound Semiconductor Catapult. This was achieved by a strong partnership between the Welsh Government, academia and the private sector.

 “Innovation Wales also underlined the need to recognise and exploit our strengths and to build on our distinct and genuine areas of excellence identified in Science for Wales.

 “Those areas of excellence are now all benefitting from Innovate UK funding and include our priority economic sectors ranging from Life Sciences and Health to Advanced Engineering and Materials.”

The Minister stated that innovation is the key to the future success of the Welsh economy and that in order to grow, Welsh businesses must evolve, and to evolve they must innovate.

The ILS, which is the research arm of the Medical School, is playing a  key role in the ARCH Programme.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. Through innovation and collaboration, the ARCH partners are working to bring research and innovation together with the NHS to transform the way healthcare is delivered in South West Wales.

ARCH also aims to drive inward investment and create new jobs by supporting the life science cluster which is thriving in this region. The ILS.

Mrs Hart added: “It is not just about new technologies; it is about successfully applying them to the markets of the future in order to achieve commercial success. Tackling this journey from concept to commercialisation, and to share some of the risk is where Innovate UK and Welsh Government step in.  

 “Welsh Government and Innovate UK work together to provide support for innovative SMEs with high-growth potential and help innovative companies work with their investors so their ideas can be developed commercially. These successful companies at ILS are benefiting from that support and we will build on the encouraging growth of Welsh success in securing Innovate UK funding.”

Medical School Dean and ARCH board member, Professor Keith Lloyd,  said: The vision for the ILS was to advance medical science through research and innovation for the benefit of human health, and to link those benefits to the economy by encouraging interaction with other organisations in a spirit of open innovation. 

 “We are currently working towards a strategy which will support the commercialisation of intellectual property (IP) within the NHS in Wales.

“This is an exciting project which, through ARCH, will unlock the innovation taking place in our health boards and support its development to benefit our patients.

“We are proud that our business centre is home to growing band of companies which are benefitting from the Welsh Government support and Innovate UK funding.

“And we were delighted to be able to showcase this
ever-growing sector to the Minster during her visit.”

Dr Neil Morgan, of Innovate UK, added: “The ILS is an important centre for the translation of world-class research. The team is fostering innovative young companies and the positive economic impact they can bring.

“Over the past six years Innovate UK has invested more than £50million in over 300 projects in Wales, a number of which are delivered through the ILS and the businesses it works with.

“We look forward to continuing our engagement with the ILS and innovation in the ARCH region in the years to come.”

Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village will be "big" for entire region

New ARCH project will create 1,000 jobs

A REVOLUTIONARY Carmarthenshire scheme to regenerate Llanelli is pushing ahead at pace and has laid out some pioneering ideas for improving the health of the entire region.

The Carmarthenshire Council-led project to create a Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes, through the ARCH health programme, is starting to become a reality as work now begins to scope out the exact details of the multi-million pound scheme.

The ARCH partners have been working with Carmarthenshire Council to develop their plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli. Through innovative thinking, working together to “think outside of the box” and wanting to achieve a common goal of improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the region, the Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village has grown from a simple idea to a ground-breaking reality.

Carmarthenshire Councillor Meryl Gravell, who is chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, has been a driving force in not only developing the idea for the wellness village, but in making sure it is delivered. And her innovation and commitment to the project is now bearing fruit as the partners look to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to continue the project.

Councillor Gravell said: “This MoU allows each of the partners involved in the project to begin more detailed work into the finer details of what will be included in the village.

“Carmarthenshire Council and the ARCH partners have now also agreed to jointly fund a project manager position which we will be recruiting for imminently.”

Councillor Gravell said she is delighted by the forward-thinking nature of the project, and added that the ambitious project will not only be the first of its kind for Wales, but also for the UK.

Councillor Gravell said: “We knew as a council that we needed to invest in building a new leisure centre facility in Llanelli. Following a round table event held by the ARCH partners last year, which discussed the wellness agenda in Wales, we saw an opportunity to work together and think in very a different way.  And now, less than 7 months on, we are proving that when we work together with an open mind – anything is possible.

“For far too long in Wales, we have accepted second best. This project is indeed ambitious but it shows we are aiming high.

“In just under a year, this kind of blue sky thinking encouraged by the  ARCH programme, has actually started to take shape.”

Councillor Gravell said the wellness agenda was a key driver in the project saying: “We must take the pressure off the local health boards. Prevention and personal responsibility for wellness and wellbeing is vital for our communities.”

Hywel Dda’s Executive lead for ARCH, Professor Kathryn Davies, added that the wellness village would allow the region to fundamentally transform the way it delivers care.  

She said: “We must re-think the health­care system and change the nature of Healthcare professionals from being less like ‘fixers’ and more like ‘coaches.’ 

“There is a need to rebalance the approach from only treating ill health and disease reactively and start focusing on lifelong lifestyle changes. We want to work with the whole community to support individuals make healthy life choices for themselves and their families.

“The Delta Lakes project shows the importance of a
collabora­tive transparent approach between all sectors. To achieve a real step-change in the health of our communities, we must understand the impact wellness has on all areas and sectors - medi­cine, research, education, sport, community public health hospitality, business and commerce.”

She added: ’’Hywel Dda University Health Board wants to see this development place local GPs, supported by multi professional Primary Care teams at the heart of the development. We want to see the skills of pharmacists, therapists, psychologists, exercise/sports therapists, eye and dental care staff working within this development all supporting people to live long and healthy lives in the way they choose to do so.’’

“There are five ways to wellness: connecting with others, being physically active, ongoing learning, mindfulness and giving. These wide-ranging wellness principles need to be put into every day practice to have impact.

“ARCH will help this happen through projects such as Delta Lakes.”

The value of the scheme was initially estimated at £60million, it is now thought that the total investment in the area will be far greater.

Meryl added: “There is much work to be done in terms of the feasibility but I think it is fair to say we hope we will see an investment into the area of in excess of £100million. As well as improving health in the area, we are keen to see this project help boost the local economy and create new jobs. We could be looking at many highly-paid jobs being created here in Carmarthenshire as a result of this scheme.”

Work has now begun to detail what will be included at the site, but elements which may potentially be included are state-of-the-art wellness/leisure centre, hydrotherapy pool, Institute of Life Science@ Hywel Dda, expansion of the Joint Clinical Research Facility (J-CRF) to recruit for clinical trials, a Health & Wellbeing Centre as well as hotel and conferencing and high spec business facilities.

Councillor Gravell, who is vice-chair of the Swansea Bay City Region Board, reiterated the role of partnership working and how important it has been in putting this regional project together.

 “I feel we are being braver because we are doing it together. The ARCH ethos is built on collaboration and innovation – and this project really is collaboration at its best. This project is a game-changer for our region.  

“This is big,” she added.

Regional Business Awards dominated by health & life science wins

ARCH's Prof Marc Clement is honoured with Lifetime Achievement Award

THE South West Wales life science and health sector won big at the region’s annual Business Awards.

 

The South Wales Evening Post and Business Life Business Awards 2016 were held at Swansea’s Brangwyn Hall last week and saw the great and the good for the business world gather to celebrate a year of success.

 

The Life Science sector won in three categories and proved why it is one of Wales’s fastest growing sectors.

Haemair Ltd, which is an Institute of Life Science (ILS)-based firm, picked up the Innovation title, while Graham Foster from ILS’s Calon Cardio scooped Entrepreneur of the Year. LeadIn won Business of the Year (0-25 employees) and the big prize of the night, Lifetime Achievement was presented to Swansea University Professor Marc Clement.

Swansea University’s ILS is a key part of the ARCH Programme which is working to improve the health and wealth of South West Wales through collaboration and innovation.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. The three organisations are working together to transform the way healthcare is delivered, develop the next generation of doctors, nurse, healthcare workers and researchers and also boost the local economy and create new jobs.

The ILS is the research and innovation arm of Swansea University’s Medical School and ARCH builds on its decade of success which has seen the ILS  help secure a total of £42million infrastructure funding, created more than 800 jobs, and in turn attracted more than £50million of  investment.

 

 

Lifetime Achievement winner professor Marc Clement is the Executive Chair at the Institute of Life Science at Swansea University Medical School, Vice-President of Swansea University with a specific role of developing major strategic projects; and Dean of the School of Management. He is also an ARCH Programme board member.

Professor Clement said he was overwhelmed at receiving the award saying: “It was a very special night for me. It meant a lot to receive the award but I have always worked as part of a team, and I thank all my colleagues for their enduring support.”

South Wales Evening Post editor Jonathan Roberts praised the success of professor Clement, telling a packed Brangwyn Hall: “Despite his many roles within academia Marc has also held a number of senior public appointments serving on, and chairing, committees on behalf of Welsh Government and he is also  a successful entrepreneur having founded several businesses and  becoming the named inventor of many patents in the field of medical devices. He has also developed a number of large-scale projects and initiatives in supercomputing and Big Data. 

“Seemingly not needing to ever sleep, this one-man whirlwind became a Founding Director of High Performance Computing Wales and established the original Blue C Supercomputer at the ILS and most recently, he has been a driving force in the conception, and development of, the innovative and visionary ARCH Programme.

“It is this project which is the realisation of our winner’s ambition to bring together science and the health service to significantly improve the health and wealth of his much-loved Wales.

“His goal was always to make lives in Wales - better – and through ARCH he is realising these ambitions.”

 

ARCH and ABMU health board chair Andrew Davies sent a special video message praising Marc’s career and his enthusiasm for improving the region. Professor Davies said: “Marc’s contribution to this region and the health and life science sectors is exceptional.

He deserves this honour and I congratulate him on this special recognition.”

Innovation winner Haemair Ltd is developing an oxygenator to help treat chronic lung disease, Calon Cardio is working to improve healthcare for patients by developing a pump to offer an alternative therapy for advanced heart failure. LeadIn, is a Finnish company that designs user-friendly technology products. Its software development centre is based at the ILS in Swansea and has created 30 skilled jobs.

Swansea University life science impact and engagement manager  Kevin Fernquest added: “The life science sector is one of Wales’s fastest growing sectors. We are privileged here in South West Wales to have so many emerging, innovative firms which are helping to not only boost the local economy but also transform lives with their research, innovation and enterprise.

“It is great to see so many ILS-affiliated firms get the recognition they deserve from the business community.”

South West Wales leads the way in thriving Welsh Life Science sector

Health and Wellbeing Academy to open in September

SOUTH WEST WALES has proven it is leading the way in life science research and innovation following a hugely successful BioWales 2016 event this week and some big announcements.

BioWales, the Welsh Government’s life science conference was held in Cardiff’s Millennium Centre over two days, and saw some of the world’s biggest health and life science players come together. Swansea University’s Professor Marc Clement, who is one of the driving forces in establishing ARCH, was a keynote speaker at the Cardiff conference this week.

Professor Clement, who had just flown in from Brussels after presenting to the European Commission on the digital, data-driven aims of the ARCH partners, presented to a packed auditorium. He announced the opening of a new Health and Wellbeing Academy in Swansea in the autumn and also talked about the programme’s links with Obama’s MoonShot 2020 mission. The US President launched his mission to find a cure for cancer during his last address of the union in January. 

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is now establishing links to be part of this world-changing mission and is also working with Welsh Government to create a Genomics Strategy for Wales. Professor Clement, Dean of Swansea University’s School of Management and Executive Chair of the Institute of Life Science said: “The theme of this year’s BioWales was Connect and Collaborate – and ARCH is an example of collaboration at its very best!

“With the ARCH partners forging ahead with projects such as the £100million Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli, the opening of a health and Wellbeing Academy in Swansea, the potential links with Obama’s MoonShot mission thanks to our work on genomics and precision medicine, AND  being part of the £500million Swansea Bay City Region deal which is now on the table – this is a very exciting time to live in this part of Wales.”

Life science is now one of Wales’s fastest growing and most innovative industries, employing over 11,000 people in more than 350 companies and contributing around £2 billion to the Welsh economy every year. And thanks to the work of the ARCH partners, South West Wales is now at the forefront of a number of exciting and pioneering developments.

The Health and Wellbeing Academy project is being driven by Swansea University’s College of Human and Health Science and will open its doors in September. Based at the Singleton Health Campus it will offer  services such as audiology, maternal family health and wellbeing services, osteoporosis and osteopathy clinics, psychological therapies, memory clinic and dementia support services as well as general health screening and cardiac and respiratory assessments.

Professor Ceri Phillips, Head of the college and ARCH Programme board member, says the innovative academy concept encapsulates everything ARCH aims to achieve in terms of transforming the way the NHS delivers care,  bringing that care closer to people’s homes and developing the next generation of doctors, nurses and healthcare workers.

Professor Phillips said: “We are delighted to announce the creation of a new Health and Wellbeing Academy as part of ARCH. The Academy aims to ease pressure on the health service, particularly for our GPs and A&E departments

“It is a unique approach aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of the people living across the ARCH region through a range of treatments and alternative ways for patients to manage their care.

“We also want to help improve care for patients who face delays in diagnosis and assessments by providing alternative options.”

Four colleges from Swansea University are playing key roles in delivering the ARCH ambitions, the Medical School and its research arm the Institute of Life Science (ILS), School of Management and College for Human and Health Science.

ARCH Programme board member and ABMU Medical Director Hamish Laing has praised  the work of the College for Human and Health Science and says the Academy will help change models of care offered in this area. Mr Laing said: “The college has an established track record for providing first class learning, teaching and research opportunities for students.

“Their vision to create an Academy at Singleton will help encourage personal responsibility for health and wellness which will deliver real advances in our Prudent Healthcare strategy and also help take the pressure off our hospitals.

“It was great to hear Professor Marc Clement make the announcement at this week’s BioWales event.”

The College of Human and Health Science is the largest provider of non-medical health professions education in Wales, covering a wide range of areas from nursing and paramedic science, to midwifery, audiology, osteopathy, cardiology and social work.

Professor Phillips said that although the Academy could not directly influence current staffing shortages in the NHS it would help reduce demand on an already stretched workforce.

 He said: Our intention is to assist primary care by taking referrals for assessment.

“One of the indicators of success of the Academy will be the number of patients diverted from entering secondary care and receiving effective community-based care instead – possibly within the Academy itself  – but ideally closer to their own homes.  

“This reduction in demand will help take pressure off the stretched workforce in secondary care and offer alternatives to GPS when managing patients with more complex health needs.

“We want people to be able to access services based on informed choice, prevention, diagnosis and self-care rather than heading straight to their GP or A&E departments for issues which could be resolved in another way.

“We also want to enrich the experience of our students, the Academy will help provide new opportunities for student placements and interactions with patients which will form part of their education.”

Professor Phillips added that the Academy concept was not limited to Swansea patients and said there was an opportunity to develop and provide similar services which complement existing service provision, across the entire South West Wales region.

He said: “The Wellness Village project in Llanelli is proof that ARCH is working with a regional view in mind.

“The College is working alongside Carmarthenshire Council and the health boards to ensure a similar model is available to people living in the Hywel Dda area.”

 “GPs can refer patients to the Academy for detailed assessments which will speed up the process for patients and avoiding the need for unnecessary additional GP consultations.

“When patients self-refer to the Academy for assessments and diagnostics they will be armed with a detailed personalised report which can then be used by their GP if necessary.”

Professor Phillips added: “We all realise it’s time to re-think the health­care system. There is a need to rebalance the traditional approach of only treating ill health reactively and start focusing on lifelong lifestyle changes and prevention rather than cure.”

 

ILS med-tech firm leads way in transforming diabetes care

City firm pioneers artificial pancreas

A SWANSEA-BASED med-tech business who are pioneering new developments in diabetes care technology have made a ground-breaking advances with an artificial pancreas.

Cellnovo, based in SA1, has developed a digitally connected insulin patch pump which will be used with the artificial pancreas.

The firm, which was founded in the Swansea University Institute of Life Science (ILS)  network, is partnering with US technology company TypeZero, who will use Cellnovo's digitally-connected insulin patch pump alongside its own software in the artificial pancreas. 

The artificial pancreas is designed to automatically monitor and regulate blood-sugar levels in people with Type 1 Diabetes through the delivery of insulin.

Cellnovo is a multi-national company which is headquartered in France but has a major facility in Swansea's SA1 district, which it expanded last year with the renting of a second suite of offices. It recently raised £23 million on Euronext exchange in Paris.

Set up in 2002 with a staff of 75, its products have been developed in the ILS network and their innovative diabetes management system is the first of its kind with mobile connectivity.

This first of its kind  mobile connectivity is able to provide immediate, wireless data updates and display real-time clinical information to patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals. This year should see global deployment of its technology.

Sophie Baratte, chief executive Officer of Cellnovo, said: “We are pleased to be working with TypeZero on this key artificial pancreas programme. This is an important milestone as it will be the first time our diabetes management system will be used by American patients taking part in this leading research programme.

"The Cellnovo diabetes management system is the ideal platform for artificial pancreas system development because of its real-time connected data, as well as its wearability and discreetness.

"The funding by the NIH for the IDCL research programme further demonstrates its key role in AP research.”

 

Cellonovo undertook its clinical trials in Swansea University’s Joint Clinical Research Facility (JCRF) and also manufacturers its products locally. JCRF is a purpose-built clinical research unit based at ABMU’s Morriston Hospital, with a second site at ILS2 on the Singleton Health Campus. Its highly-trained research nursing staff serve a population of more than 500,000 and was established in 1990.

The clinical trials programme is a key component of the ARCH programme. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and Swansea University. ARCH aims to improve the health and wealth of South West Wales through collaboration, innovation and research.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU’s Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development and clinical lead for the Diabetes Research Network Cymru, has praised the ground-breaking work of Cello Novo and the region’s role in helping to develop their products.

Professor Bain, a member of the Wales Diabetes and Endocrine Society and part of the ARCH research and development working group, said: “The involvement of Cellnovo in this pioneering artificial pancreas project highlights the high regard for their insulin patch pump which was developed here in South West Wales.

“This device uses state-of-the-art technology and was first tested in people with diabetes in Swansea’s Joint Clinical Research Facility
(JCRF).”

 

An ARCH spokesman added: “The integration of the existing university campus at Singleton and the hospital site into a new Singleton Health Campus will provide real physical changes which will enhance the collaborative research and innovation activity between the ARCH partners.

“The work of Swansea University’s Medical School, through the ILS, will create a new science MediPark environment where life science research and business can drive the development of the existing local cluster while also attracting world-leading organisations to the region.”

“Cellonovo’s innovation in diabetes care and management is a fantastic testament to the health research already underway jointly between the university and health boards.

“ARCH will capitalise on this impressive foundation by expanding the scale and breadth of research excellence to really benefit patients in this region.”

Chad Rogers, founder and CEO of TypeZero Technologies, added: “The integration of Cellnovo’s insulin patch pump with our inControl AP platform is a tremendous step forward for this artificial pancreas product.

"We believe that patients should have the choice of using the insulin delivery device that best suits their needs and lifestyle. The Cellnovo pump, with its connected data system and unique combination of patch pump and infusion set, is an amazing option for patients.

"We look forward to bringing this solution to patients in the upcoming IDCL trial as well as other studies throughout 2016/17.”

PwC, the largest provider of audit and professional services in the UK,  was the company who took Cello Novo public. PwC recently  announced the relocation of their Swansea offices to the Singleton Health Campus as part of the ARCH Programme’s MediPark initiative, creating five new graduate jobs as part of the move.

Swansea University’s Medical School ILS Executive Chairman and Dean of  Management School, Professor Marc Clement,  said of the move last month:  “The arrival of PwC absolutely strengthens the development of the regional Life Sciences and Health ecosystem here in Swansea and indeed South West Wales.”

Health Minister's £1.2million backing of ARCH

Funding will resource ARCH Programme Office

EFFORTS to transform healthcare across the Swansea Bay City Region have been given huge backing by the powers that be in Cardiff.

The ARCH Programme has received £1.2million of funding from the Health Minister Mark Drakeford to continue their work to transform the health and wealth of the people of South West Wales.

Health and Social Services Minister, Mark Drakeford said: “I welcome the health boards’ commitment to jointly lead this collaboration, working closely with university and local authority partners. The ARCH Programme has made good progress during the last year and I hope this Welsh Government support will help to maintain the pace. 

“Through  ARCH, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda university health boards will be able to drive their future development in ways which genuinely integrate health and care services, using new technologies and services to improve access to care, which are personalised to each patient, available at a time and place which is convenient to them throughout the region.”

Andrew Davies, ARCH chair and ABMU health board chairman, said he was delighted with the backing from Welsh Government.

He said: “This announcement of Welsh Government funding to develop the ARCH Programme  is tremendous news. To have this backing from the Health Minister to progress the ARCH project is wonderful.

“Nothing of the scale and ambition of ARCH, in terms of transforming healthcare, has been attempted in Wales before.  ARCH will not only give us the opportunity to deliver a health care service for people and communities in South  West Wales which is fit for the 21st Century, but it will also bring a  massive boost to the local economy and help to create new jobs for the people of South West Wales.

ARCH will also lead the way in innovation and research by helping to develop cutting-edge technology and treatments which will be of real benefit to our patients.

“This announcement by the Minister is a massive vote of confidence by Welsh Government in the ability of the ARCH partners of ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University to deliver this ambition.
“The three ARCH partners are committed to continuing their efforts to establish this region as a world-leader in innovation, research and healthcare.”

Hywel Dda University Health Board chief executive Steve Moore has also welcomed the funding boost adding: “We are delighted to receive this backing from Welsh Government.  Hywel Dda is proud to be part of the ARCH collaboration and we realise the potential benefits working on a regional footprint will bring to our communities.”

Swansea University’s Vice-Chancellor Richard Davies has also welcomed the backing, adding: “This is fantastic news and a massive endorsement for the vision, enthusiasm, and commitment of the ARCH partners. Even more importantly, it will accelerate delivery to benefit the entire region.”

Sian Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU Director for Strategy and Executive Lead for the ARCH Programme, has praised the Welsh Government for understanding both the ambition and scale of the ARCH vision. She said: “This is a hugely exciting opportunity to make a significant difference to the health, wealth and well-being of the population of South West Wales. We welcome that Welsh Government have recognised the scale of the ARCH ambition, and that they also see the value in our collaborative approach.

What is ARCH?

ARCH is health and science working together, to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) will generate a future for the people of South West Wales which delivers better health, skills and economic outcomes.  This world-class, visionary project is a collaboration between Abertawe Bro Morgannwg  and Hywel Dda and Swansea University.

It will affect  almost a million people and  works together with social care, voluntary and other public bodies – offering a truly whole systems approach.

 It breaks free from an outdated healthcare system designed over 50 years ago and replaces it with an accessible one specifically planned for today’s needs, in purpose-built or refurbished accommodation. It focuses on keeping people healthy; or better managing disease when they’re ill.

 

£60million Llanelli Wellness Village plans discussed by Hywel Dda chiefs

Hywel Dda Health Board hosted an event to discuss Wellness Village plans, which form part of the ambitious ARCH Programme.

PLANS for how the health service can contribute to a multi-million pound health and wellbeing village  in Llanelli have been discussed by leading West Wales health bosses.

 

Hywel Dda Health Board hosted an event in Carmarthen in November to discuss the plans, which form part of the ambitious ARCH Programme.

The £60 million Llanelli Wellness Village, led by Carmarthenshire Council, which would be the first of its kind in Wales  and  unique to Llanelli.

 

The scope that the health service and transformational ARCH Programme could play in the development  was discussed by Hywel Dda chief executive Steve Moore and senior health staff at the Carmarthen Leisure Centre workshop held to discuss ARCH.

 

ARCH  is a collaboration between Hywel Dda, its Swansea counterpart ABMU and Swansea University. It also spans six local authority areas of Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, Bridgend, Neath Port Talbot and Swansea. It is poised to bring huge benefits to West Wales though world class technology for patients; improved recruitment meaning more staff on hospital wards and a major boost to the region’s economy through working with global commercial, including  technology and pharmaceutical  partners.

 

 

The proposed  Llanelli Wellness Centre is just one element of the ARCH project and aims to see a new leisure centre built which will also a wellness education centre, a health and wellbeing academy, out of hours GP services, therapies centre, hotel and conferencing and business facilities.

 

Swansea University senior lecturer and ARCH Project Manager  Bjorn Rodde spoke to  Hywel Dda staff  members about the potential benefit,  not only to Llanelli but the entire region of South West Wales.

He said: “All of these services help people live longer and enjoy a better quality of life while providing sustainable jobs for the future.”

 

 

The Llanelli Wellness community in Delta Lakes, could  also see the development of ILS@Hywel Dda. The Institute of Life Science (ILS) is Wales’s premier purpose-built medical research  facility and is based at Swansea University. 

It is hoped Carmarthenshire will benefit from the same innovation and research which benefits all our health with the creation of the Hywel Dda facility in Llanelli.

Funding could come from the EU but also from private investment and match funding in various forms. Carmarthenshire Council has said it would supply the land for the project.

 

Hywel Dda chief executive Steve Moore told the invited audience that the health board is committed to the ARCH Programme but urged his senior managers to make the most of what ARCH can offer.

He said: “ARCH will be everything to everyone, but as a health board we must be clear about what we want to get out of the project for our communities.

“This programme really does offer us the chance to improve the services we deliver across the Hywel Dda area and to transform the way we operate as an organisation.

“We are committed to ARCH, but now is the time to work with our partners and be specific about what it can bring to us.”

He emphasised that working effectrively as a region is in the hands of the Hywel Dda team He added:   “Collaboration is a choice.”

 

 

Another of the guest speakers at the Carmarthenshire event was  Dr Phil Kloer,  Dr Phil Kloer,  Medical Director & Director of Clinical Strategy for Hywel Dda, also praised the ARCH Programme and encouraged his colleagues to support the scheme.

He said: “This will break new ground.  By linking ARCH’s ambitions  with our  local clinical strategy we can be a leader in rural health services and even possibly repatriate certain services to Hywel Dda.

“We do have some fragile service models, we need to work together now and  everyone needs to be a part of it.”

He added: “Now is the moment to connect to ARCH as an organisation.”

Clinical Research Excellence

Swansea's reputation for clinical research excellence set for a boost thanks to ambitious proposals

Swansea's status as a city of excellence for clinical research could be massively boosted in years to come — with the benefits felt across the South West Wales region.

The city's two main hospitals and the university's School of Medicine already collaborate on a wide range of clinical trials which are not just good for patients they are good for the NHS and the local economy too.

Now ambitious proposals to transform healthcare across South West Wales — revealed by the Post in July — will see more trials taking place in both the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda university health board areas.

Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) will bring health and science together to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

A world-class collaboration between the two health boards and Swansea University, it will replace an outdated healthcare system with one specifically designed for today's needs.

It will also promote research, training and skills — creating the potential for a significant increase in clinical trials.

What makes the region special is its unusually stable, homogenous population of around a million people, many with chronic illnesses which plague the modern world, like cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

This combination is a potential honey-pot for research and development companies developing treatments and devices.

Arch's visionary scope is recognised by Arnaud Bernaert, head of health and healthcare industries for the World Economic Forum, who attended the Arch launch event in the Liberty Stadium in September.

He said a number of key characteristics of Arch were in line with those of the WEF. He added: "There is an opportunity for us to collaborate. We are, at the Economic Forum, a platform for public-private partnership, and have connected public-private sectors for the past 45 years."

"I'm totally convinced that many of our 40 partners in healthcare practice would be very interested in what you do. Maybe this is an opportunity to accelerate the progress of this initiative."

Clinical trials involve new medicines or devices that are being licensed and are trialled on patients, who have agreed to take part, to determine whether they are safe and more effective than current treatments.

One involved a new diabetes medicine. Treboeth granddad Ron Beynon, diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes 25 years ago, took part and has seen a remarkable transformation.

His weight, which had gone up, has fallen dramatically and his insulin dose is now much reduced.

Ron, aged 75, said: "I'm very close to being a non-diabetic. It is reversible but you've got to put the work in."

Like others on the trial, in Morriston Hospital's Diabetic Centre, he doesn't know if he had the medication or a placebo (non-active dummy). But, he said, the fact he was involved made him get to grips with his condition.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU's assistant medical director for research and development, said: "There is evidence that people on clinical trials do better than people who aren't.

"There's also evidence that people who take their medicine regularly, whether it's active or a placebo, do better as well.

"If we can encourage people to get involved in clinical trials and get engaged with their condition, they tend to do better."

Professor Bain said Swansea had a good track record of working with new drugs for treating diabetes. He added: "We already see ourselves as a leading centre and attract work from global pharmaceutical companies.

"Hopefully the development of Arch will lead to an upscaling of our activities so we can become a major player in the global search for new diabetes medicines.

"That in turn gives people in South West Wales the opportunity to take part in clinical trials so it will be a win-win situation."

Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the medical school, they save the NHS money because the medicines are provided free by the companies trying to license them.

Having people on these trials also frees up places within hospitals so NHS patients can be treated more quickly.

Clinical trials benefit the local economy too. Self-employed Swansea taxi driver Dave Thompson provides the transport for patients on the trials.

When he started eight years ago it was worth a few hundred pounds a month — now it generates 10 times that. Dave said: "I've had to take other drivers on. They're self-employed and do the work for me. They're landed."

Professor Bain said: "Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, Arch gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales. All these trials are closely monitored and we have people visiting on a weekly basis to keep tabs on them. If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy."

Investing in Young, Local Talent

Nurturing the talent of local youngsters

Over 200 pupils in Year 11 from Bishopston Comprehensive school have been invited to a special careers conference highlighting the variety of jobs in the NHS and life science sector such as laboratory and scientific testing to help diagnose and treat illnesses.

The first Elevate Conference is being held at Swansea University on Wednesday 21st October and if it proves a hit with the Bishopston pupils there’ll be more to come.

Conference organiser, Bev Wilson-Smith, Advocate of Life Science Skills at Gower College said: “Pupils will be able to take part in interactive workshops supported by academic staff as well as industry giants such as GSK and Fujitsu. Here they’ll have the opportunity to find out all they need to know about their chosen career or even a career they didn’t know existed.”

Hamish Laing, ABMU Medical Director added: “Both ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards face challenges in terms of recruitment. This is not unique to this area but it’s a real problem for us.

“We want to be able to draw on people from our local communities, to encourage them into health and life sciences-related careers so that they want to work in this area and really improve the health of our communities.”

The conference will also introduce the Talent Bank; a new and innovative learning experience for those aged 16 years and over who are interested in a career in the medical, healthcare and scientific professions.

Beverley explained: “Research conducted with national and local employers tell us there’s a real need to increase the skills and talent required for their fields of work. With our partners, employers, academia and the NHS, the Talent Bank will provide young learners with access to industry expertise and specialist facilities that ordinarily they wouldn’t be able to access.

“We’re looking forward to the pupils getting involved and helping us to shape the Talent Bank via an interactive questionnaire.

“We’ve also made a start working with health board staff to identify work placements specifically designed to enable learners to gain insight into working in a hospital or health science environment. These placements will also allow learners to support and help – where appropriate - the professionals and teams they are working with giving them real experience.

“As a result the Talent Bank will enhance the region’s supply of skills and talent for the health and life sciences sector.”

Developing local talent and shaping the future healthcare and life sciences workforce is a key part of the Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) project.

The project, to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales, is a partnership involving ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and Swansea University.

As part of Arch, Gower College Swansea will open a new centre in autumn 2016 for 100 Talent Bank learners. To maximise learning opportunities and work place experience the centre will be located between Swansea University and Singleton Hospital. 

ARCH Programme Transforming the Health, Wealth and Wellbeing of the Communities of South West Wales

Transforming the Health economy in South West Wales

The ARCH Programme is a partnership Programme between ABMU Health Board Hywel Dda University Health Board, and Swansea University.

Delivering improved health & wellbeing for the communities of South West Wales and improved services for the 1 million people who live in the region.

ARCH aims to develop the workforce that is required for the 21st Century and is working with both the Further Education and Higher Education sectors to deliver this. 

Finally through the partnership ARCH will deliver economic benefits through the development of Health and Life Science sector of the economy.

Work starts at Delta Lakes for multi-million-pound wellness village

Initial ground works underway to support the ‘once in a lifetime’ future development of the Llanelli Waterside Joint Venture land.

 

 Alun Griffiths (Contractors) Ltd has been appointed to carry out the site preparation works following a competitive tender exercise using the council’s contractor framework.

 

The Wellness and Life Science Village – which will see an investment of more than £200million along the Llanelli coastline - is being led by Carmarthenshire County Council, under the ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) programme, which is a partnership between Hywel Dda and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Boards and Swansea University.

 

It is also a key project for the Swansea Bay City Region and is earmarked to receive £40million as part of the £1.3billion City Deal funding.

 

The largest ever regeneration project in South West Wales, it aims to improve the health and wellbeing of people across the region, creating high quality jobs and boosting the economy.

 

The proposals include an Institute of Life Science with laboratory and clinic space and an incubation facility for business start-up, research and development; a wellness hub incorporating a new ‘state-of-the-art’ sports and leisure centre, a wellbeing centre, a wellness hotel and an assisted living village all interlinked and set within a ‘green’ eco-park.

 

Council Leader Emlyn Dole said: “This is a very exciting time for the region and I am delighted to see that initial works have started. Delta Lakes will provide a ‘world class’ Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli bringing together health, leisure, business and research.

 

“As well as encouraging people to lead healthier lives and delivering care closer to people’s homes; it aims to build on the success of the Institute of Life Science (ILS) at Swansea University attracting private sector investment which will create up to 2000 good quality, well-paid jobs across a range of professions and boost the economy by a staggering £467 million over 15 years.”

 

The Swansea Bay City Deal is a £1.3billion investment that will transform the economic landscape of the area, boosting the local economy by £1.8billion, and generating almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years.

 

The Swansea Bay City Region Board includes four local authorities – Carmarthenshire County Council, Swansea City Council, Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council and Pembrokeshire County Council - together with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, and private sector companies.

It was signed by Prime Minister Theresa May and Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones, the Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns, Welsh Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Local Government Professor Mark Drakeford, and the leaders of the four authorities on Monday, March 20, 2017.

 

CAPTION: Carmarthenshire Chief Executive Mark James, Council Leader Emlyn Dole, local members Louvain Roberts and John Prosser with representatives of Alun Griffiths (Contractors) Ltd at the Delta Lakes site.

 

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Work starts at Delta Lakes for multi-million-pound wellness village

Initial ground works underway to support the ‘once in a lifetime’ future development of the Llanelli Waterside Joint Venture land.

 

 Alun Griffiths (Contractors) Ltd has been appointed to carry out the site preparation works following a competitive tender exercise using the council’s contractor framework.

 

The Wellness and Life Science Village – which will see an investment of more than £200million along the Llanelli coastline - is being led by Carmarthenshire County Council, under the ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) programme, which is a partnership between Hywel Dda and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Boards and Swansea University.

 

It is also a key project for the Swansea Bay City Region and is earmarked to receive £40million as part of the £1.3billion City Deal funding.

 

The largest ever regeneration project in South West Wales, it aims to improve the health and wellbeing of people across the region, creating high quality jobs and boosting the economy.

 

The proposals include an Institute of Life Science with laboratory and clinic space and an incubation facility for business start-up, research and development; a wellness hub incorporating a new ‘state-of-the-art’ sports and leisure centre, a wellbeing centre, a wellness hotel and an assisted living village all interlinked and set within a ‘green’ eco-park.

 

Council Leader Emlyn Dole said: “This is a very exciting time for the region and I am delighted to see that initial works have started. Delta Lakes will provide a ‘world class’ Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli bringing together health, leisure, business and research.

 

“As well as encouraging people to lead healthier lives and delivering care closer to people’s homes; it aims to build on the success of the Institute of Life Science (ILS) at Swansea University attracting private sector investment which will create up to 2000 good quality, well-paid jobs across a range of professions and boost the economy by a staggering £467 million over 15 years.”

 

The Swansea Bay City Deal is a £1.3billion investment that will transform the economic landscape of the area, boosting the local economy by £1.8billion, and generating almost 10,000 new jobs over the next 15 years.

 

The Swansea Bay City Region Board includes four local authorities – Carmarthenshire County Council, Swansea City Council, Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council and Pembrokeshire County Council - together with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, and private sector companies.

It was signed by Prime Minister Theresa May and Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones, the Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns, Welsh Cabinet Secretary for Finance and Local Government Professor Mark Drakeford, and the leaders of the four authorities on Monday, March 20, 2017.

 

CAPTION: Carmarthenshire Chief Executive Mark James, Council Leader Emlyn Dole, local members Louvain Roberts and John Prosser with representatives of Alun Griffiths (Contractors) Ltd at the Delta Lakes site.

 

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IBI group appointed to Swansea Wellness Centre project

Feasibility study for Swansea health & wellbeing scheme gets underway

Swansea Council, in partnership with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, has commissioned specialist healthcare advisors, IBI Group, to work on the feasibility of a new city centre wellness centre that aims to address future trends in healthcare.

In a move to place as much emphasis on people’s wellbeing as on healthcare, the partners are seeking to examine how to create a state-of-the-art wellness centre that also makes full use of the opportunities afforded by healthcare technology.

The forward-thinking proposal will mean city centre residents can combine a trip to see their GP with the use of a wide range of non-clinical services that can support health and wellbeing in a drive to encourage individuals to take greater care of their health.

The IBI Group are looking at a range of city centre locations which are currently being scored as part of the feasibility study. IBI are providing expert advice on what the wellness centre could contain, as well as the viability, preferred location, and delivery options for the proposal is IBI Group, which has a track record in the development of innovative health and wellbeing centres across the UK.

The new facility would be an integrated development which could include facilities such as a GP services, community healthcare, services from the third sector, a satellite facility from Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science – the research and innovation arm of the Medical School, and an education and skills development centre.

Justin Harris, IBI Group studio principal, said: “Pressures on our healthcare systems are increasing due to rapid population growth and rising costs. Therefore, we need to create environments that enable the right care at the right time, and most importantly support lifestyles that promote mental and physical wellbeing.

“The Swansea Wellness Centre will offer visitors a choice to how they manage their health, and for staff, a high-quality environment to better deliver support to the community.”

 An alliance of local agencies called Swansea Public Services Board (PSB) will be helping to shape the proposals. The board includes Swansea Council, ABMU Health Board and the innovative health initiative ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health). The proposals will look to address the long-term wellbeing of the population and will form part of Swansea’s wider regeneration plans, and the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable places scheme.

 Professor Hamish Laing, ABMU medical director and ARCH board member, said: “We want to provide our citizens with fit-for-purpose, modern healthcare service that is built on the ethos of prevention and early intervention. Moreover, we want to give everyone the opportunity to place personal health and wellbeing at the heart of their daily routine.”

 ARCH is a partnership between ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University, aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people living in South West Wales. It was formed to tackle many of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.

 Siân Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU director of strategy and ARCH board member, said: “We are pleased to see this Swansea wellness project moving forward with the appointment of IBI Group.

“This centre will be part of a wider regional network of ARCH health and wellbeing schemes being developed across the whole of South West Wales including the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village in Delta Lakes which is being led by Carmarthenshire Council.

 “Too many people in our region die younger than in other parts of the UK. We also have an ageing population, often with complex needs and we are facing significant service challenges.

“Too many people are currently treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere. With our health service facing unprecedented challenges, there is a clear need for us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care.

 “These schemes will allow people to access the care and support they need in their communities and help ensure demand is better managed across the whole care system. They will also regenerate areas and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health.”

 IBI Group are due to report their findings to Welsh Government by the end of June.

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IBI group appointed to Swansea Wellness Centre project

Feasibility study for Swansea health & wellbeing scheme gets underway

Swansea Council, in partnership with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, has commissioned specialist healthcare advisors, IBI Group, to work on the feasibility of a new city centre wellness centre that aims to address future trends in healthcare.

In a move to place as much emphasis on people’s wellbeing as on healthcare, the partners are seeking to examine how to create a state-of-the-art wellness centre that also makes full use of the opportunities afforded by healthcare technology.

The forward-thinking proposal will mean city centre residents can combine a trip to see their GP with the use of a wide range of non-clinical services that can support health and wellbeing in a drive to encourage individuals to take greater care of their health.

The IBI Group are looking at a range of city centre locations which are currently being scored as part of the feasibility study. IBI are providing expert advice on what the wellness centre could contain, as well as the viability, preferred location, and delivery options for the proposal is IBI Group, which has a track record in the development of innovative health and wellbeing centres across the UK.

The new facility would be an integrated development which could include facilities such as a GP services, community healthcare, services from the third sector, a satellite facility from Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science – the research and innovation arm of the Medical School, and an education and skills development centre.

Justin Harris, IBI Group studio principal, said: “Pressures on our healthcare systems are increasing due to rapid population growth and rising costs. Therefore, we need to create environments that enable the right care at the right time, and most importantly support lifestyles that promote mental and physical wellbeing.

“The Swansea Wellness Centre will offer visitors a choice to how they manage their health, and for staff, a high-quality environment to better deliver support to the community.”

 An alliance of local agencies called Swansea Public Services Board (PSB) will be helping to shape the proposals. The board includes Swansea Council, ABMU Health Board and the innovative health initiative ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health). The proposals will look to address the long-term wellbeing of the population and will form part of Swansea’s wider regeneration plans, and the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable places scheme.

 Professor Hamish Laing, ABMU medical director and ARCH board member, said: “We want to provide our citizens with fit-for-purpose, modern healthcare service that is built on the ethos of prevention and early intervention. Moreover, we want to give everyone the opportunity to place personal health and wellbeing at the heart of their daily routine.”

 ARCH is a partnership between ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University, aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people living in South West Wales. It was formed to tackle many of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.

 Siân Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU director of strategy and ARCH board member, said: “We are pleased to see this Swansea wellness project moving forward with the appointment of IBI Group.

“This centre will be part of a wider regional network of ARCH health and wellbeing schemes being developed across the whole of South West Wales including the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village in Delta Lakes which is being led by Carmarthenshire Council.

 “Too many people in our region die younger than in other parts of the UK. We also have an ageing population, often with complex needs and we are facing significant service challenges.

“Too many people are currently treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere. With our health service facing unprecedented challenges, there is a clear need for us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care.

 “These schemes will allow people to access the care and support they need in their communities and help ensure demand is better managed across the whole care system. They will also regenerate areas and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health.”

 IBI Group are due to report their findings to Welsh Government by the end of June.

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Swansea University’s Medical School named in UK’s top 3 alongside Oxford and Cambridge

Swansea University’s Medical School is celebrating after being named the 3rd best medical school in the UK – only beaten by Oxford and Cambridge.

The university, which was named Wales’s number one university in The Times Good University Guide last year, is one of only three universities in Wales to improve on last year’s position in The Complete University Guide 2018 by moving up one place to 44th in the UK. But it is the ongoing success of the Swansea University’s Medical School which has seen them secure a top three place - alongside the UK’s leading universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean of the Medical School, said he was delighted to be in the company of such illustrious institutions in the 2018 rankings.

Prof Lloyd said: “I am delighted to be able to say that Swansea University’s Medical School is ranked 1st in the UK for research environment, 2nd for overall research quality and is now the UK’s 3rd best medical school beaten only by Oxford and Cambridge.

“The rankings are measured by our research quality and intensity, our employability and graduate prospects and student satisfaction. As a school we are constantly striving to innovate, expand and deliver world-class education. This success is a huge pat on the back for all our staff and our students.

“Following the signing of the £1.3billion Swansea Bay City Region City Deal, of which the Medical School is a part through the ARCH partnership, we are committed to being part of delivering a region which can excel and attract the very best talent and skills, but also investment.”

Professor Lloyd added: “This is truly an exciting time for this region, the City Deal will allow us to accelerate ARCH projects such as regional expansion of our Institute of Life Science and the Medical School’s Healthcare Technology and Innovation Centre on the Singleton Campus.  These projects will be central to helping us create new job and  support business growth in the health and life science sector and also allow us to create new products and services - which will not only deliver economic growth - but also positively benefit patients.”

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards. ARCH forms the health and wellbeing element of the Swansea Bay City Region which aims to transform the economic landscape of the area with high-spec digital infrastructure and world-class facilities in the fields of health and life science innovation, energy and smart manufacturing.

ABMU and ARCH chairman Prof Andrew Davies has praised the success of the Medical School and emphasised the school’s critical role within delivering both the ARCH and City Region vision.

Professor Davies said: “I am delighted for the Medical School, this ranking demonstrates the excellence we have right here on our doorstep.

“Having been heavily involved as a Welsh Minister and local Assembly Member in establishing Swansea University’s Medical School it is a great pleasure for me to see the Medical School fulfilling the vision and ambitions we had for it in the early years of the Welsh Assembly - and showing the rest of the UK a clean pair of heels.

“ARCH is a pro-active response to the urgent requirement to reshape and upskill the workforce to be fit for purpose with changing service models, patient expectations and overall needs. We have already seen the establishment of the Medical School’s new Physician Associate course, which has seen 15 funded place students begin their training as in 2016 and funding agreed for a further 2017 intake. ARCH aims to establish a pipeline which builds on the Medical School’s success to date by making the most of the opportunities to train future staff to meet the need articulated by the health boards.”

Professor Lloyd added: “I want to thank all our staff and students for their ongoing commitment to deliver world-class education, research and innovation that make a real difference for health and wellbeing.”

The Complete University Guide 2018 states:  “Swansea University has made a real statement in making a consistent Medicine Top 10 appearance since it first debuted in this subject table.  Swansea's meteoric rise to the top is driven by its research quality score, with the student satisfaction and graduate prospects scores solidly backing it up.”

For the Complete University Guide 2018 visit:

https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings?s=medicine

3 of 36

Swansea University’s Medical School named in UK’s top 3 alongside Oxford and Cambridge

Swansea University’s Medical School is celebrating after being named the 3rd best medical school in the UK – only beaten by Oxford and Cambridge.

The university, which was named Wales’s number one university in The Times Good University Guide last year, is one of only three universities in Wales to improve on last year’s position in The Complete University Guide 2018 by moving up one place to 44th in the UK. But it is the ongoing success of the Swansea University’s Medical School which has seen them secure a top three place - alongside the UK’s leading universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean of the Medical School, said he was delighted to be in the company of such illustrious institutions in the 2018 rankings.

Prof Lloyd said: “I am delighted to be able to say that Swansea University’s Medical School is ranked 1st in the UK for research environment, 2nd for overall research quality and is now the UK’s 3rd best medical school beaten only by Oxford and Cambridge.

“The rankings are measured by our research quality and intensity, our employability and graduate prospects and student satisfaction. As a school we are constantly striving to innovate, expand and deliver world-class education. This success is a huge pat on the back for all our staff and our students.

“Following the signing of the £1.3billion Swansea Bay City Region City Deal, of which the Medical School is a part through the ARCH partnership, we are committed to being part of delivering a region which can excel and attract the very best talent and skills, but also investment.”

Professor Lloyd added: “This is truly an exciting time for this region, the City Deal will allow us to accelerate ARCH projects such as regional expansion of our Institute of Life Science and the Medical School’s Healthcare Technology and Innovation Centre on the Singleton Campus.  These projects will be central to helping us create new job and  support business growth in the health and life science sector and also allow us to create new products and services - which will not only deliver economic growth - but also positively benefit patients.”

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards. ARCH forms the health and wellbeing element of the Swansea Bay City Region which aims to transform the economic landscape of the area with high-spec digital infrastructure and world-class facilities in the fields of health and life science innovation, energy and smart manufacturing.

ABMU and ARCH chairman Prof Andrew Davies has praised the success of the Medical School and emphasised the school’s critical role within delivering both the ARCH and City Region vision.

Professor Davies said: “I am delighted for the Medical School, this ranking demonstrates the excellence we have right here on our doorstep.

“Having been heavily involved as a Welsh Minister and local Assembly Member in establishing Swansea University’s Medical School it is a great pleasure for me to see the Medical School fulfilling the vision and ambitions we had for it in the early years of the Welsh Assembly - and showing the rest of the UK a clean pair of heels.

“ARCH is a pro-active response to the urgent requirement to reshape and upskill the workforce to be fit for purpose with changing service models, patient expectations and overall needs. We have already seen the establishment of the Medical School’s new Physician Associate course, which has seen 15 funded place students begin their training as in 2016 and funding agreed for a further 2017 intake. ARCH aims to establish a pipeline which builds on the Medical School’s success to date by making the most of the opportunities to train future staff to meet the need articulated by the health boards.”

Professor Lloyd added: “I want to thank all our staff and students for their ongoing commitment to deliver world-class education, research and innovation that make a real difference for health and wellbeing.”

The Complete University Guide 2018 states:  “Swansea University has made a real statement in making a consistent Medicine Top 10 appearance since it first debuted in this subject table.  Swansea's meteoric rise to the top is driven by its research quality score, with the student satisfaction and graduate prospects scores solidly backing it up.”

For the Complete University Guide 2018 visit:

https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings?s=medicine

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ARCH partners submit Portfolio Delivery Plan to Welsh Government

ARCH submits Portfolio Delivery Plan to Welsh Government

ARCH was formed because we believe a joined up, regional approach is the only way we will be able to deliver meaningful change to improve the health, wealth, and wellbeing of South West Wales.

ARCH is a unique proposition, built on an ethos of collaboration - working together to find a regional solution to tackle enduring societal and economic challenges. It is helping our region tackle 21st Century health challenges, while in a way that stays true to the founding principles of the NHS.

Over the past 18 months, we have put our words into action, developed robust partnership arrangements, compelling plans, and got on with delivering those projects within our control, including ensuring ARCH is one strand of the recently signed £1.3billion City Deal bid for the Swansea Bay City Region.

We have now submitted our Portfolio Delivery Plan (PDP) to Welsh Government for their consideration. The PDP is essentially a roadmap to delivering the ARCH vision.

Over the next three years, we commit to delivering the plans set out within the PDP document.

We face significant service challenges. Too many people are treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere; care is not joined up between teams and is not always of a consistent quality.

We spend too much money dealing with the symptoms rather than causes of ill health and our health service faces unprecedented financial challenges, requiring us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care and structures.

The actions we have taken and are proposing in the PDP respond directly to these challenges; balancing the need to make urgent improvements to our core business and performance at the same time as transforming our service models. Specifically, our plan describes action in the following four key areas:

-Skills, education and workforce:

We will recover and stabilise health board expenditure on flexible staffing arrangements, which not only contribute to a significant variable pay bill but also threaten the continuity and quality of healthcare. In addition to immediate workforce control measures, we are working with Swansea University and other educational partners to train the next generation of healthcare professionals and scientists, including developing novel recruitment and retention approaches. Together, we will make South West Wales a destination of choice to train, work, and live due to the exciting agenda being advanced by ARCH.

-Health and Wellbeing:

We will accelerate the development of several health and wellbeing schemes, with primary care at their heart, designed to ensure people can access the care and support they need in their communities, and reducing demand on a pressurised secondary care system. Most schemes are part of wider Public Service Board (PSBs) developments that aim to regenerate and breath life back into places, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health and wellbeing.

-Service Transformation:

We have identified 10 clinical and service areas, where we will plan and manage our services over a regional footprint, developing our proposals in partnership with our citizens, to ensure high standards of care and support provided to all of our communities. Our service transformations will be underpinned by cutting edge research and scientific advancements, ensuring the healthcare delivered in our region is cutting edge.

-Research, Enterprise and Innovation:

We are providing the foundations for joined up business and investment proposals to boost the economic growth of the area. The City Deal was considerably driven by the expertise, talent and capability of Swansea University. The economic “accelerator partnership” of ARCH will cement the region’s role as a test bed for new health technologies, particular through expanding our successful Institute of Life Science. We will continue to nurture and create high quality jobs and bring prosperity to South West Wales.

These areas represent big opportunities for us but there will be challenges along the way. We realise that now is the time to be bold to deliver against Welsh Government’s ambitious agenda to create a Wales which is prosperous and secure, healthy and active, ambitious and learning, united and connected, and there is a real commitment from each of the partners to ensure our vision and aims are implemented and delivered.

This is an ambitious plan – the first of its kind in this country – and we invite the Welsh Government to walk alongside us as we move into an implementation phase.

ARCH offers a fantastic opportunity to grow and develop together, not least in respect of health and healthcare. We’re starting from a strong place as a number of excellent processes for working collaboratively across the area are already in place.

Through ARCH, we have a great opportunity to respond swiftly and effectively to the needs of our communities and to co-produce a healthier future with them.

 

ARCH offers a fantastic opportunity to grow and develop together, not least in respect of health and healthcare. We’re starting from a strong place as a number of excellent processes for working

collaboratively across the area are already in place.

Through ARCH, we have a great opportunity to respond swiftly and effectively to the needs of our communities and to co-produce a healthier future with them.

4 of 36

ARCH partners submit Portfolio Delivery Plan to Welsh Government

ARCH submits Portfolio Delivery Plan to Welsh Government

ARCH was formed because we believe a joined up, regional approach is the only way we will be able to deliver meaningful change to improve the health, wealth, and wellbeing of South West Wales.

ARCH is a unique proposition, built on an ethos of collaboration - working together to find a regional solution to tackle enduring societal and economic challenges. It is helping our region tackle 21st Century health challenges, while in a way that stays true to the founding principles of the NHS.

Over the past 18 months, we have put our words into action, developed robust partnership arrangements, compelling plans, and got on with delivering those projects within our control, including ensuring ARCH is one strand of the recently signed £1.3billion City Deal bid for the Swansea Bay City Region.

We have now submitted our Portfolio Delivery Plan (PDP) to Welsh Government for their consideration. The PDP is essentially a roadmap to delivering the ARCH vision.

Over the next three years, we commit to delivering the plans set out within the PDP document.

We face significant service challenges. Too many people are treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere; care is not joined up between teams and is not always of a consistent quality.

We spend too much money dealing with the symptoms rather than causes of ill health and our health service faces unprecedented financial challenges, requiring us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care and structures.

The actions we have taken and are proposing in the PDP respond directly to these challenges; balancing the need to make urgent improvements to our core business and performance at the same time as transforming our service models. Specifically, our plan describes action in the following four key areas:

-Skills, education and workforce:

We will recover and stabilise health board expenditure on flexible staffing arrangements, which not only contribute to a significant variable pay bill but also threaten the continuity and quality of healthcare. In addition to immediate workforce control measures, we are working with Swansea University and other educational partners to train the next generation of healthcare professionals and scientists, including developing novel recruitment and retention approaches. Together, we will make South West Wales a destination of choice to train, work, and live due to the exciting agenda being advanced by ARCH.

-Health and Wellbeing:

We will accelerate the development of several health and wellbeing schemes, with primary care at their heart, designed to ensure people can access the care and support they need in their communities, and reducing demand on a pressurised secondary care system. Most schemes are part of wider Public Service Board (PSBs) developments that aim to regenerate and breath life back into places, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health and wellbeing.

-Service Transformation:

We have identified 10 clinical and service areas, where we will plan and manage our services over a regional footprint, developing our proposals in partnership with our citizens, to ensure high standards of care and support provided to all of our communities. Our service transformations will be underpinned by cutting edge research and scientific advancements, ensuring the healthcare delivered in our region is cutting edge.

-Research, Enterprise and Innovation:

We are providing the foundations for joined up business and investment proposals to boost the economic growth of the area. The City Deal was considerably driven by the expertise, talent and capability of Swansea University. The economic “accelerator partnership” of ARCH will cement the region’s role as a test bed for new health technologies, particular through expanding our successful Institute of Life Science. We will continue to nurture and create high quality jobs and bring prosperity to South West Wales.

These areas represent big opportunities for us but there will be challenges along the way. We realise that now is the time to be bold to deliver against Welsh Government’s ambitious agenda to create a Wales which is prosperous and secure, healthy and active, ambitious and learning, united and connected, and there is a real commitment from each of the partners to ensure our vision and aims are implemented and delivered.

This is an ambitious plan – the first of its kind in this country – and we invite the Welsh Government to walk alongside us as we move into an implementation phase.

ARCH offers a fantastic opportunity to grow and develop together, not least in respect of health and healthcare. We’re starting from a strong place as a number of excellent processes for working collaboratively across the area are already in place.

Through ARCH, we have a great opportunity to respond swiftly and effectively to the needs of our communities and to co-produce a healthier future with them.

 

ARCH offers a fantastic opportunity to grow and develop together, not least in respect of health and healthcare. We’re starting from a strong place as a number of excellent processes for working

collaboratively across the area are already in place.

Through ARCH, we have a great opportunity to respond swiftly and effectively to the needs of our communities and to co-produce a healthier future with them.

4 of 36

New Health & Wellbeing Academy will 'transform healthcare'

College opens new Health & Wellbeing Academy in Singleton

A new health & wellbeing academy dedicated to providing non-medical treatments will "transform healthcare" in South West Wales, Swansea University has said.

The centre, based at the university's College of Human and Health Sciences, will offer osteopathy, post-bereavement care, midwifery support and brain injuries rehabilitation. It is hoped the service will help ease pressure on NHS services.

Students at the centre will observe and learn in a real clinical setting.

 The centre, which is being delivered as part of the £600million ARCH partnership, was opened by Health Secretary Vaughan Gething on Monday, March 6.

Academy director Julia Pridmore said some of the services, like audiology and osteopathy, will be available for drop-in patients.

She said: "If we make it easier for people to have themselves checked out at the first sign of trouble, or even just to reassure themselves that they are healthy, then hopefully we can reduce the amount of cases which become acute, requiring costly and difficult hospital treatment later on."

The academy, together with bereavement charity Cruse, has created a children's bereavement support group.

One of the services currently in very short supply across Wales is specialist post-bereavement care for children and young people.

Dr Zac Maunder, who manages the group, said: "Research shows that early intervention can be enormously beneficial for bereaved young people, but all too often there are shortages of specially-trained counsellors and lengthy waiting lists. We now have the chance to provide a forum for young people to talk to us and each other."

The health and wellbeing secretary said the academy will "enable staff to engage in cutting edge research that will drive innovation and excellence in Wales".

 

ARCH and ABMU chair Prof Andrew Davies added: “I am delighted to see the Health & Wellbeing Academy up and running. This unique facility is one of the first services to be delivered as part of the ambitious ARCH portfolio proposed for the region.

“The ARCH partners are working together to ensure South West Wales is able to deliver high-quality patient care and ensure we have staff with the right skills to do so. Working with our university colleagues on projects such as the academy is an important step in delivering these aims.”

 

5 of 36

New Health & Wellbeing Academy will 'transform healthcare'

College opens new Health & Wellbeing Academy in Singleton

A new health & wellbeing academy dedicated to providing non-medical treatments will "transform healthcare" in South West Wales, Swansea University has said.

The centre, based at the university's College of Human and Health Sciences, will offer osteopathy, post-bereavement care, midwifery support and brain injuries rehabilitation. It is hoped the service will help ease pressure on NHS services.

Students at the centre will observe and learn in a real clinical setting.

 The centre, which is being delivered as part of the £600million ARCH partnership, was opened by Health Secretary Vaughan Gething on Monday, March 6.

Academy director Julia Pridmore said some of the services, like audiology and osteopathy, will be available for drop-in patients.

She said: "If we make it easier for people to have themselves checked out at the first sign of trouble, or even just to reassure themselves that they are healthy, then hopefully we can reduce the amount of cases which become acute, requiring costly and difficult hospital treatment later on."

The academy, together with bereavement charity Cruse, has created a children's bereavement support group.

One of the services currently in very short supply across Wales is specialist post-bereavement care for children and young people.

Dr Zac Maunder, who manages the group, said: "Research shows that early intervention can be enormously beneficial for bereaved young people, but all too often there are shortages of specially-trained counsellors and lengthy waiting lists. We now have the chance to provide a forum for young people to talk to us and each other."

The health and wellbeing secretary said the academy will "enable staff to engage in cutting edge research that will drive innovation and excellence in Wales".

 

ARCH and ABMU chair Prof Andrew Davies added: “I am delighted to see the Health & Wellbeing Academy up and running. This unique facility is one of the first services to be delivered as part of the ambitious ARCH portfolio proposed for the region.

“The ARCH partners are working together to ensure South West Wales is able to deliver high-quality patient care and ensure we have staff with the right skills to do so. Working with our university colleagues on projects such as the academy is an important step in delivering these aims.”

 

5 of 36

New online forum helps NHS staff in South West Wales connect and improve care

 An innovative online forum has been launched which brings together NHS staff and academics who are all working to improve health services in this region.

The online forum is called ARCH-i, the i standing for “improvement” and will allow busy NHS professionals access to a range of improvement resources and ready access to expertise in South West Wales. The developing field of improvement science has been widely applied in industry to improve services and ensure reliability but uptake in health services across the world is still at a relatively early stage. 

ARCH-i is being delivered through the ARCH Portfolio. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards and Swansea University aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales.

ARCH was formed to tackle some of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.  These three organisations have come together to action significant change at scale - and at pace.

 ABMU chair and ARCH chair Professor Andrew Davies has praised the launch of the new online improvement forum. He said: “I am delighted the ARCH partnership is able to support this excellent network of our staff.

“We already have many best-in-class services.

“This online meeting place will ensure we are making the most of the huge amount of expertise available across South West Wales and support our clinicians to share experience and continue to achieve excellence.”

 The network already has over 200 members and aims to achieve 1,000 active participants within its first three months.

Christopher Jones, ABMU Pharmacist &Improvement Science Practitioner at Singleton Hospital’s Cancer Centre, said NHS staff in this area were keen to learn from each other and share the wealth of expertise in both ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards, as well as maximise the research taking place in Swansea University around improvement science.

Mr Jones said: “We all want to improve the care and services we provide. There is a huge amount of experience and expertise in ABMU and being able to tap into this is invaluable in my day to day work.

“By adding Swansea University and Hywel Dda health board to the mix, this means potentially 30,000 NHS employees can share best practice, innovation and so much more – all of which will contribute to improving NHS care.”

Jessicca Svetz, Hywel Dda University Health Board’s Service Improvement Manager praised the new forum. She said: “The ARCH-i project and subsequent online portal will become the one-stop-shop for service improvement professionals in the health sector of South West Wales.

“We envisage that this will drive collaboration, along with the spread of ideas and best practice all with the end goal of improving patient experiences.

 “ARCH-i is a much needed resource for academic, clinical and management professionals associated with the health sector. Linking these three professional groups will drive improvement to the service areas at most need, by allowing for the most up to date thinking being translated to on the ground delivery of services.” 

Over 50 improvement science professionals from Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University got together in person earlier this month to share their experiences along with colleagues from The Bevan Commission, at the SHINE event hosted at Parc y Scarlets in Llanelli.

Dr Sharon Williams, ARCH-i Project lead, based at Swansea University, said the event helped shape the direction of the online portal. She said: “The event provided us with a vital opportunity to drive the direction of ARCH-i, which will link improvers and improvement across South West Wales. ARCH-i will provide a virtual meeting point for news updates, sharing and collaboration, a gateway to an international improvement community, learning and problem solving and the spread of ideas and good practice.

“So many of our clinicians and managers are doing excellent improvement work but ARCH-i will give them ready access to advice and support plus a way to share their expertise. Providing this via a web resource fits well with people’s busy schedules.

“There will be regular hot topics for members to discuss and we want to encourage members to have an instant dialogue to be able to exchange improvement ideas and innovations.”

 Sign up here: http://www.arch.wales/forum-register.htm

6 of 36

New online forum helps NHS staff in South West Wales connect and improve care

 An innovative online forum has been launched which brings together NHS staff and academics who are all working to improve health services in this region.

The online forum is called ARCH-i, the i standing for “improvement” and will allow busy NHS professionals access to a range of improvement resources and ready access to expertise in South West Wales. The developing field of improvement science has been widely applied in industry to improve services and ensure reliability but uptake in health services across the world is still at a relatively early stage. 

ARCH-i is being delivered through the ARCH Portfolio. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards and Swansea University aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales.

ARCH was formed to tackle some of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.  These three organisations have come together to action significant change at scale - and at pace.

 ABMU chair and ARCH chair Professor Andrew Davies has praised the launch of the new online improvement forum. He said: “I am delighted the ARCH partnership is able to support this excellent network of our staff.

“We already have many best-in-class services.

“This online meeting place will ensure we are making the most of the huge amount of expertise available across South West Wales and support our clinicians to share experience and continue to achieve excellence.”

 The network already has over 200 members and aims to achieve 1,000 active participants within its first three months.

Christopher Jones, ABMU Pharmacist &Improvement Science Practitioner at Singleton Hospital’s Cancer Centre, said NHS staff in this area were keen to learn from each other and share the wealth of expertise in both ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards, as well as maximise the research taking place in Swansea University around improvement science.

Mr Jones said: “We all want to improve the care and services we provide. There is a huge amount of experience and expertise in ABMU and being able to tap into this is invaluable in my day to day work.

“By adding Swansea University and Hywel Dda health board to the mix, this means potentially 30,000 NHS employees can share best practice, innovation and so much more – all of which will contribute to improving NHS care.”

Jessicca Svetz, Hywel Dda University Health Board’s Service Improvement Manager praised the new forum. She said: “The ARCH-i project and subsequent online portal will become the one-stop-shop for service improvement professionals in the health sector of South West Wales.

“We envisage that this will drive collaboration, along with the spread of ideas and best practice all with the end goal of improving patient experiences.

 “ARCH-i is a much needed resource for academic, clinical and management professionals associated with the health sector. Linking these three professional groups will drive improvement to the service areas at most need, by allowing for the most up to date thinking being translated to on the ground delivery of services.” 

Over 50 improvement science professionals from Abertawe Bro Morgannwg Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University got together in person earlier this month to share their experiences along with colleagues from The Bevan Commission, at the SHINE event hosted at Parc y Scarlets in Llanelli.

Dr Sharon Williams, ARCH-i Project lead, based at Swansea University, said the event helped shape the direction of the online portal. She said: “The event provided us with a vital opportunity to drive the direction of ARCH-i, which will link improvers and improvement across South West Wales. ARCH-i will provide a virtual meeting point for news updates, sharing and collaboration, a gateway to an international improvement community, learning and problem solving and the spread of ideas and good practice.

“So many of our clinicians and managers are doing excellent improvement work but ARCH-i will give them ready access to advice and support plus a way to share their expertise. Providing this via a web resource fits well with people’s busy schedules.

“There will be regular hot topics for members to discuss and we want to encourage members to have an instant dialogue to be able to exchange improvement ideas and innovations.”

 Sign up here: http://www.arch.wales/forum-register.htm

6 of 36

Research on baby sleep patterns helps parents

Should babies really sleep through the night? Swansea Uni's College of Human and Health Science at Swansea University has the answer

A new animated research video intended to help new mothers to find out more about baby sleep patterns and feeding has been created by Swansea University.

The film summarises research by academics at Swansea University's College of Human and Health Sciences which challenges the idea that babies should be sleeping through the night and disproves the myth that stopping breastfeeding or giving more solid food to babies helps them to sleep longer at night.

Dr Amy Brown, programme director for the MSc Child Public Health course, said: “The film helps to highlight the key research findings which firstly contest the idea that babies should be sleeping through the night once they are past a few weeks old and secondly that what you feed babies will help their sleep. There is a common belief that formula milk or giving more solid foods will help your baby sleep better and this study shows this isn’t true. We did find that mothers who were breastfeeding fed their baby more at night but this could be because breastfeeding is a simple way to get your baby back to sleep quickly! The babies who were formula fed still woke up, they just weren’t fed.”

The study asked 715 mothers with a baby aged 6 – 12 months how often their baby usually woke in the night and whether they fed their baby when it woke.

The research found:

  • 78% of babies at this age still regularly woke at least once in the night
  • 61% of babies had at least one milk feed during the night.
  • there was no difference in the number of times babies woke up dependent on whether they were breast or formula fed, how many feeds they had in the day or how many solid meals they ate.

Dr Brown said: “We hope that this film and our findings are of comfort to new mothers who have a baby who is still waking in the night, in showing them that many other babies are waking too. We hope that it will also give new mothers confidence to continue breastfeeding and introducing solids gradually as they know stopping will not magically make their baby sleep.”

Swansea University’s  College of Human and Health Sciences is a key part  of the ARCH Programme. The college is represented on all of the ARCH working groups underpinning the ARCH developments. The college is one of  the largest providers of non-medical health professions education in Wales, as well as a provider of social work qualifications, a psychology department with close working relationships with both health boards, an ethics group and research centres in Ageing and Health Economics. This means the college is a major player in the Skills and Workforce Development arm of ARCH.

7 of 36

Research on baby sleep patterns helps parents

Should babies really sleep through the night? Swansea Uni's College of Human and Health Science at Swansea University has the answer

A new animated research video intended to help new mothers to find out more about baby sleep patterns and feeding has been created by Swansea University.

The film summarises research by academics at Swansea University's College of Human and Health Sciences which challenges the idea that babies should be sleeping through the night and disproves the myth that stopping breastfeeding or giving more solid food to babies helps them to sleep longer at night.

Dr Amy Brown, programme director for the MSc Child Public Health course, said: “The film helps to highlight the key research findings which firstly contest the idea that babies should be sleeping through the night once they are past a few weeks old and secondly that what you feed babies will help their sleep. There is a common belief that formula milk or giving more solid foods will help your baby sleep better and this study shows this isn’t true. We did find that mothers who were breastfeeding fed their baby more at night but this could be because breastfeeding is a simple way to get your baby back to sleep quickly! The babies who were formula fed still woke up, they just weren’t fed.”

The study asked 715 mothers with a baby aged 6 – 12 months how often their baby usually woke in the night and whether they fed their baby when it woke.

The research found:

  • 78% of babies at this age still regularly woke at least once in the night
  • 61% of babies had at least one milk feed during the night.
  • there was no difference in the number of times babies woke up dependent on whether they were breast or formula fed, how many feeds they had in the day or how many solid meals they ate.

Dr Brown said: “We hope that this film and our findings are of comfort to new mothers who have a baby who is still waking in the night, in showing them that many other babies are waking too. We hope that it will also give new mothers confidence to continue breastfeeding and introducing solids gradually as they know stopping will not magically make their baby sleep.”

Swansea University’s  College of Human and Health Sciences is a key part  of the ARCH Programme. The college is represented on all of the ARCH working groups underpinning the ARCH developments. The college is one of  the largest providers of non-medical health professions education in Wales, as well as a provider of social work qualifications, a psychology department with close working relationships with both health boards, an ethics group and research centres in Ageing and Health Economics. This means the college is a major player in the Skills and Workforce Development arm of ARCH.

7 of 36

Eating disorder app launched through new Swansea University innovation project

£13.5million project to pioneer research has been launched

 A £13.5million project which brings together academics, clinicians and industry to pioneer research into cutting-edge health technologies is now up and running.

 Welsh Government Finance Secretary, Mark Drakeford, said: “This project will stimulate innovation in the NHS, turning new ideas into improved health services, while also paving the way for new jobs and business opportunities.

“This is another good example of how EU funds – combined with Welsh Government support – are supporting research, innovation and science in Wales.”

Led by Swansea University through the ARCH partnership, AgorIP is working with the NHS and industry across Wales to turn innovative research into new products and services.

The  project which was backed by the Welsh Government and the European  Regional Development Fund last year aims to support the transformation of research with the potential for commercialisation in universities and health boards. Agor – which in Welsh means “open” – and IP which stands for “Intellectual Property” aims to encourage and support everyone working in the NHS in Wales to turn their ideas into reality.

Dr Gerry Ronan, from Swansea University, is leading the project. He said: “This is another positive example of how Swansea University’s collaboration with the NHS can help drive forward new concepts and research to grow our knowledge economy, putting Wales on a global platform.

“As part of the AgorIP project, commercial sector experts will help progress new ideas through experimental and industrial development, demonstrating proof of concept to potential funders and attracting further research investment.

“AgorIP was piloted through the Welsh Government’s Academia for Business project, which was supported by the EU funding programme 2007-13. AgorIP secured £4million of private sector funding to create six spin-outs within a year. This project will build on this first phase, opening up a pipeline of untapped research and turning innovative ideas into products and services for the commercial market.” 

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda university health boards. ARCH covers six local authority areas and benefits 1 million people across South West Wales.

The ARCH partnership brings together health and science to transform the way health is delivered in the region. Unlocking and supporting innovation is one of the aims of the ARCH partnership.

Professor Marc Clement, ARCH board member Swansea University’s Dean of the School of Management, said: “As a university we pride ourselves on our links with industry and this is another example of how sectors can work together. This ARCH project will help unlock innovation in the NHS and will provide a support service to drive this innovation and realise the huge value from Intellectual Property (IP) generated across ARCH region and indeed Wales.”

Dr Ronan added: “AgorIP will open a pipeline of untapped valuable opportunities to work with researchers and NHS staff  to disclose concepts with development potential.

“An example of how this works in practice is our work with Aneurin Bevan University Health Board to develop an app which aims to support the prevention of eating disorders. The Diet or Disorder? app provides tools to support and empower those who might have an eating disorder as well as their loved ones. The app provides a host of information in a portable format and gives education about eating disorders, including decisional tools to help identify an eating problem. It also signposts to the available support in Wales, simple self-help strategies and links to other resources.”

The app, which is free for android, smartphone and tablet users, has been developed with input from the Adult Eating Disorders Service, sufferers, carers and the third sector, with advice from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Network (CAHMS), public health, education and healthcare professionals. It has been designed and tested by both experts by experience and members of the public who are not familiar with eating disorders, as well as health professionals.

The App, which has been funded by the AgorIP project with money from the Welsh Government, was launched by Vaughan Gething, Cabinet Secretary for Health, at the Senedd last week.

Jacinta Tan, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Swansea University led the development of the app, she said: “There are currently 1.6 million people in the UK who are directly affected by eating disorders and the healthcare costs to the NHS is between £3.9 and £4.6 billion each year. Eating disorders are serious and have the highest mortality rates of any mental disorder and that’s because only a minority of people receive the help needed from specialist or general mental health services.

“Evidence has shown that eating disorders usually begin in adolescence and young adulthood and early identification and intervention is vital as recovery is less likely if remained untreated for over three years. This app aims to get straight to those who need it most with the benefits derived from such early intervention.”

The AgorIP project will be officially launched at this year’s MediWales Connects conference in Cardiff on June 21. The event brings together NHS Wales, academia and industry to share clinical innovation in practice which improves the care patients receive.

This year’s conference, which is being held in Cardiff’s Mecure Holland House Hotel, will also showcase the work of the ARCH partnership including the development of health and wellbeing schemes across South West Wales as well as how the recently signed Swansea Bay City Region City Deal will accelerate the delivery of many of the ARCH projects. 

 

8 of 36

Eating disorder app launched through new Swansea University innovation project

£13.5million project to pioneer research has been launched

 A £13.5million project which brings together academics, clinicians and industry to pioneer research into cutting-edge health technologies is now up and running.

 Welsh Government Finance Secretary, Mark Drakeford, said: “This project will stimulate innovation in the NHS, turning new ideas into improved health services, while also paving the way for new jobs and business opportunities.

“This is another good example of how EU funds – combined with Welsh Government support – are supporting research, innovation and science in Wales.”

Led by Swansea University through the ARCH partnership, AgorIP is working with the NHS and industry across Wales to turn innovative research into new products and services.

The  project which was backed by the Welsh Government and the European  Regional Development Fund last year aims to support the transformation of research with the potential for commercialisation in universities and health boards. Agor – which in Welsh means “open” – and IP which stands for “Intellectual Property” aims to encourage and support everyone working in the NHS in Wales to turn their ideas into reality.

Dr Gerry Ronan, from Swansea University, is leading the project. He said: “This is another positive example of how Swansea University’s collaboration with the NHS can help drive forward new concepts and research to grow our knowledge economy, putting Wales on a global platform.

“As part of the AgorIP project, commercial sector experts will help progress new ideas through experimental and industrial development, demonstrating proof of concept to potential funders and attracting further research investment.

“AgorIP was piloted through the Welsh Government’s Academia for Business project, which was supported by the EU funding programme 2007-13. AgorIP secured £4million of private sector funding to create six spin-outs within a year. This project will build on this first phase, opening up a pipeline of untapped research and turning innovative ideas into products and services for the commercial market.” 

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda university health boards. ARCH covers six local authority areas and benefits 1 million people across South West Wales.

The ARCH partnership brings together health and science to transform the way health is delivered in the region. Unlocking and supporting innovation is one of the aims of the ARCH partnership.

Professor Marc Clement, ARCH board member Swansea University’s Dean of the School of Management, said: “As a university we pride ourselves on our links with industry and this is another example of how sectors can work together. This ARCH project will help unlock innovation in the NHS and will provide a support service to drive this innovation and realise the huge value from Intellectual Property (IP) generated across ARCH region and indeed Wales.”

Dr Ronan added: “AgorIP will open a pipeline of untapped valuable opportunities to work with researchers and NHS staff  to disclose concepts with development potential.

“An example of how this works in practice is our work with Aneurin Bevan University Health Board to develop an app which aims to support the prevention of eating disorders. The Diet or Disorder? app provides tools to support and empower those who might have an eating disorder as well as their loved ones. The app provides a host of information in a portable format and gives education about eating disorders, including decisional tools to help identify an eating problem. It also signposts to the available support in Wales, simple self-help strategies and links to other resources.”

The app, which is free for android, smartphone and tablet users, has been developed with input from the Adult Eating Disorders Service, sufferers, carers and the third sector, with advice from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service Network (CAHMS), public health, education and healthcare professionals. It has been designed and tested by both experts by experience and members of the public who are not familiar with eating disorders, as well as health professionals.

The App, which has been funded by the AgorIP project with money from the Welsh Government, was launched by Vaughan Gething, Cabinet Secretary for Health, at the Senedd last week.

Jacinta Tan, Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Swansea University led the development of the app, she said: “There are currently 1.6 million people in the UK who are directly affected by eating disorders and the healthcare costs to the NHS is between £3.9 and £4.6 billion each year. Eating disorders are serious and have the highest mortality rates of any mental disorder and that’s because only a minority of people receive the help needed from specialist or general mental health services.

“Evidence has shown that eating disorders usually begin in adolescence and young adulthood and early identification and intervention is vital as recovery is less likely if remained untreated for over three years. This app aims to get straight to those who need it most with the benefits derived from such early intervention.”

The AgorIP project will be officially launched at this year’s MediWales Connects conference in Cardiff on June 21. The event brings together NHS Wales, academia and industry to share clinical innovation in practice which improves the care patients receive.

This year’s conference, which is being held in Cardiff’s Mecure Holland House Hotel, will also showcase the work of the ARCH partnership including the development of health and wellbeing schemes across South West Wales as well as how the recently signed Swansea Bay City Region City Deal will accelerate the delivery of many of the ARCH projects. 

 

8 of 36

Swansea City Centre to benefit from GP and wellbeing services under one roof

IBI Group to develop feasibility study of new city centre wellness centre

Swansea Council, in partnership with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, has commissioned specialist healthcare advisors, IBI Group, to work on the feasibility of a new city centre wellness centre that aims to address future trends in healthcare.

 In a move to place as much emphasis on people’s wellbeing as on healthcare, the partners are seeking to examine how to create a state-of-the-art wellness centre that also makes full use of the opportunities afforded by healthcare technology.

 The forward-thinking proposal will mean city centre residents can combine a trip to see their GP with the use of a wide range of non-clinical services that can support health and wellbeing in a drive to encourage individuals to take greater care of their health.

 The IBI Group are looking at a range of city centre locations which are currently being scored as part of the feasibility study. IBI are providing expert advice on what the wellness centre could contain, as well as the viability, preferred location, and delivery options for the proposal is IBI Group, which has a track record in the development of innovative health and wellbeing centres across the UK.

 

The new facility would be an integrated development which could include facilities such as a GP services, community healthcare, services from the third sector, a satellite facility from Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science – the research and innovation arm of the Medical School, and an education and skills development centre.

 

Justin Harris, IBI Group studio principal, said: “Pressures on our healthcare systems are increasing due to rapid population growth and rising costs. Therefore, we need to create environments that enable the right care at the right time, and most importantly support lifestyles that promote mental and physical wellbeing.

“The Swansea Wellness Centre will offer visitors a choice to how they manage their health, and for staff, a high-quality environment to better deliver support to the community.”

 

An alliance of local agencies called Swansea Public Services Board (PSB) will be helping to shape the proposals. The board includes Swansea Council, ABMU Health Board and the innovative health initiative ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health). The proposals will look to address the long-term wellbeing of the population and will form part of Swansea’s wider regeneration plans, and the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable places scheme.

 

Professor Hamish Laing, ABMU medical director and ARCH board member, said: “We want to provide our citizens with fit-for-purpose, modern healthcare service that is built on the ethos of prevention and early intervention. Moreover, we want to give everyone the opportunity to place personal health and wellbeing at the heart of their daily routine.”

 

ARCH is a  partnership between ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University, aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people living in South West Wales. It was formed to tackle many of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.

 

Siân Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU director of strategy and ARCH board member, said: “We are pleased to see this Swansea wellness project moving forward with the appointment of IBI Group.

“This centre will be part of a wider regional network of ARCH health and wellbeing schemes being developed across the whole of South West Wales including the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village in Delta Lakes which is being led by Carmarthenshire Council.

 

“Too many people in our region die younger than in other parts of the UK. We also have an ageing population, often with complex needs and we are facing significant service challenges.

“Too many people are currently treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere. With our health service facing unprecedented challenges, there is a clear need for us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care.

 

“These schemes will allow people to access the care and support they need in their communities and help ensure demand is better managed across the whole care system. They will also regenerate areas and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health.”

 

IBI Group are due to report their findings to Welsh Government by the end of June.

 

9 of 36

Swansea City Centre to benefit from GP and wellbeing services under one roof

IBI Group to develop feasibility study of new city centre wellness centre

Swansea Council, in partnership with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, has commissioned specialist healthcare advisors, IBI Group, to work on the feasibility of a new city centre wellness centre that aims to address future trends in healthcare.

 In a move to place as much emphasis on people’s wellbeing as on healthcare, the partners are seeking to examine how to create a state-of-the-art wellness centre that also makes full use of the opportunities afforded by healthcare technology.

 The forward-thinking proposal will mean city centre residents can combine a trip to see their GP with the use of a wide range of non-clinical services that can support health and wellbeing in a drive to encourage individuals to take greater care of their health.

 The IBI Group are looking at a range of city centre locations which are currently being scored as part of the feasibility study. IBI are providing expert advice on what the wellness centre could contain, as well as the viability, preferred location, and delivery options for the proposal is IBI Group, which has a track record in the development of innovative health and wellbeing centres across the UK.

 

The new facility would be an integrated development which could include facilities such as a GP services, community healthcare, services from the third sector, a satellite facility from Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science – the research and innovation arm of the Medical School, and an education and skills development centre.

 

Justin Harris, IBI Group studio principal, said: “Pressures on our healthcare systems are increasing due to rapid population growth and rising costs. Therefore, we need to create environments that enable the right care at the right time, and most importantly support lifestyles that promote mental and physical wellbeing.

“The Swansea Wellness Centre will offer visitors a choice to how they manage their health, and for staff, a high-quality environment to better deliver support to the community.”

 

An alliance of local agencies called Swansea Public Services Board (PSB) will be helping to shape the proposals. The board includes Swansea Council, ABMU Health Board and the innovative health initiative ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health). The proposals will look to address the long-term wellbeing of the population and will form part of Swansea’s wider regeneration plans, and the Welsh Government’s Vibrant and Viable places scheme.

 

Professor Hamish Laing, ABMU medical director and ARCH board member, said: “We want to provide our citizens with fit-for-purpose, modern healthcare service that is built on the ethos of prevention and early intervention. Moreover, we want to give everyone the opportunity to place personal health and wellbeing at the heart of their daily routine.”

 

ARCH is a  partnership between ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University, aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people living in South West Wales. It was formed to tackle many of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis.

 

Siân Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU director of strategy and ARCH board member, said: “We are pleased to see this Swansea wellness project moving forward with the appointment of IBI Group.

“This centre will be part of a wider regional network of ARCH health and wellbeing schemes being developed across the whole of South West Wales including the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village in Delta Lakes which is being led by Carmarthenshire Council.

 

“Too many people in our region die younger than in other parts of the UK. We also have an ageing population, often with complex needs and we are facing significant service challenges.

“Too many people are currently treated in hospitals when their needs could be better met elsewhere. With our health service facing unprecedented challenges, there is a clear need for us to fundamentally rethink our clinical models of care.

 

“These schemes will allow people to access the care and support they need in their communities and help ensure demand is better managed across the whole care system. They will also regenerate areas and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health.”

 

IBI Group are due to report their findings to Welsh Government by the end of June.

 

9 of 36

New Health & Wellbeing Academy welcomes local Talent Bank students

Talent Bank students visit Health & Wellbeing Academy

Local students from the unique Talent Bank Further Education programme have been welcomed at Swansea’s newly opened Health & Wellbeing Academy.

A-level students from across the area were given a tour of the new academy, which was opened by Health Minister Vaughan Gething last week on Swansea University’s Singleton Campus.

Craig Toutt, Director of Academic and Clinical Operations at the Health and Wellbeing Academy, led the visit. He said: “The students demonstrated a strong desire to understand what it meant to be a healthcare professional, what skills they would need to develop and how they could plan their futures.

“All of the students were engaging and conducted themselves in a professional manner, we look forward to working closely with Talent Bank in the future to support their aims and help them take advantage of the fantastic facilities and expertise here in the Academy.”

Talent Bank, which is partnering with Gower College and being delivered through the ARCH partnership, is a bespoke Further Education programme specifically designed to support the evolving health and life science sector in South West Wales.

Talent Bank project director Beverley Wilson-Smith said the programme will ensure young people in this area graduate with the necessary skills to progress to university, go on to work-based learning or directly into employment.

Beverley Wilson-Smith said: “The Talent Bank will allow students from across the region working in partnership with FE providers to be exposed to the world of the NHS, industry and innovation.

“We know the workforce issues the health service faces and this programme is aimed at growing local talent and expanding the skills supply across the South West Wales region.

“Our students get hands-on, world-class exposure to industry experts from across the UK as well as health service professionals, innovators and leaders.

“The Talent Bank students were given a tour of the newly opened Academy where they learned about the various alternative non-medical career paths available to them such as osteopathy, audiology, cardiology to name but a few and they were delighted to see first hand the state-of-the-art resources available.

“I very much welcome this collaborative working approach between the Talent Bank and the Academy as it will help create much-needed work experience opportunities giving our youngsters a valuable insight into the vast range of non-medical NHS professions the College of Human and Health Sciences provides.

“We are now working closely with the college to design a health and wellbeing-based programme of education which will be set at the heart of future Talent Bank learning. This will be a vital component in teaching and training young people to consider their own health and wellbeing so that they stay well, healthy and fit for longer and reduce future pressures on the NHS.”

Talent Bank, which is being delivered through the ARCH partnership, is for young people aged 16+ wanting to study Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) A-levels or vocational and technical qualifications.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda university health boards who have come together to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

Prof Ceri Phillips, Head of College of Human and Health Sciences and ARCH board member, said he was delighted the students were able to view the academy first hand in its first few weeks of opening. Prof Phillips said: “The Talent Bank and Health & Wellbeing Academy are just two of the projects being delivered through the ARCH partnership. We were delighted to welcome the students and realise widening access into health & life science sector education is a vital part of tackling the NHS’s workforce issues.

“ARCH is focusing on activity which will generate the workforce pipeline of the future – to achieve this we must educate our health professionals of tomorrow in a way which ensures those nurtured and trained here are likely to stay and work within the region.

“I believe Talent Bank is a positive step towards re-orientating the education system which can deliver a workforce with the right skills to deliver next generation healthcare.”

 

 

 

Amy Hodgson, aged 17, from Baglan, was the Talent Bank’s very first student. The Gower College student is studying A-level Maths, Biology and Physics.

Here Amy, a former Glanafan pupil, talks about her experiences as a Talent Bank student:

“I first heard about the Talent Bank programme during an open evening at the Institute of Life Science at Swansea University last year. I knew I wanted to study biology and physics at A-level but wasn’t sure what I could do with those qualifications once I left college.

 

I take my normal lessons at college then I am released into Talent Bank one day a week. There are about 12 of us on the pilot project and it’s really helped me get a better view of life beyond A-levels.

 

We have been able to get first-hand experience in both the NHS and industry. We have visited pathology in Singleton Hospital, been part of an NHS induction at Morriston Hospital and seen cardiology staff at work and also learned how to take blood in the simulation suite at Morriston’s Education Centre which was brilliant. It was also really interesting to see the new Health & Wellbeing Academy and the non-medical career options the College of Human and Health sciences offers.

 

We have also carried out an industry challenge on diabetes, looking at the causes, symptoms, treatment and research linked to diabetes. We were able to work with Cello Novo a diabetes firm who are creating an artificial pancreas which was really interesting.

I was lucky enough to have 2 day placement at Swansea University’s Centre of Nanotechnology at the Institute of Life Science. I didn’t even know that kind of research and development existed.

 

Talent Bank has helped me decide that I want to pursue a career in medical engineering and I am hoping to get work experience in ABMU’s specialist rehab unit in Morriston over the summer.

I also been paired with a health mentor thanks to the Mullany Trust. My mentor is a cruise ship doctor and we speak virtually in a safe and monitored way so I can find out more about other career options available in health and life sciences.

 

It’s been great to be immersed in university life too thanks to the Fujitsu Innovation Hub on the Bay Campus. I am definitely considering staying in Swansea to continue my education and I hope I can start my career in this area too.

 

Talent Bank has opened my eyes to the opportunities here in South West Wales and helped me rule out as much as rule in education and employment choices, which has been so helpful to me and my parents.”

 

For more information on joining the 2017 Talent Bank programme, there will be a free open evening held at Morriston Hospital’s Education Department on April 5, 5pm to 7pm, visit www.talentbank.wales

10 of 36

New Health & Wellbeing Academy welcomes local Talent Bank students

Talent Bank students visit Health & Wellbeing Academy

Local students from the unique Talent Bank Further Education programme have been welcomed at Swansea’s newly opened Health & Wellbeing Academy.

A-level students from across the area were given a tour of the new academy, which was opened by Health Minister Vaughan Gething last week on Swansea University’s Singleton Campus.

Craig Toutt, Director of Academic and Clinical Operations at the Health and Wellbeing Academy, led the visit. He said: “The students demonstrated a strong desire to understand what it meant to be a healthcare professional, what skills they would need to develop and how they could plan their futures.

“All of the students were engaging and conducted themselves in a professional manner, we look forward to working closely with Talent Bank in the future to support their aims and help them take advantage of the fantastic facilities and expertise here in the Academy.”

Talent Bank, which is partnering with Gower College and being delivered through the ARCH partnership, is a bespoke Further Education programme specifically designed to support the evolving health and life science sector in South West Wales.

Talent Bank project director Beverley Wilson-Smith said the programme will ensure young people in this area graduate with the necessary skills to progress to university, go on to work-based learning or directly into employment.

Beverley Wilson-Smith said: “The Talent Bank will allow students from across the region working in partnership with FE providers to be exposed to the world of the NHS, industry and innovation.

“We know the workforce issues the health service faces and this programme is aimed at growing local talent and expanding the skills supply across the South West Wales region.

“Our students get hands-on, world-class exposure to industry experts from across the UK as well as health service professionals, innovators and leaders.

“The Talent Bank students were given a tour of the newly opened Academy where they learned about the various alternative non-medical career paths available to them such as osteopathy, audiology, cardiology to name but a few and they were delighted to see first hand the state-of-the-art resources available.

“I very much welcome this collaborative working approach between the Talent Bank and the Academy as it will help create much-needed work experience opportunities giving our youngsters a valuable insight into the vast range of non-medical NHS professions the College of Human and Health Sciences provides.

“We are now working closely with the college to design a health and wellbeing-based programme of education which will be set at the heart of future Talent Bank learning. This will be a vital component in teaching and training young people to consider their own health and wellbeing so that they stay well, healthy and fit for longer and reduce future pressures on the NHS.”

Talent Bank, which is being delivered through the ARCH partnership, is for young people aged 16+ wanting to study Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) A-levels or vocational and technical qualifications.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda university health boards who have come together to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

Prof Ceri Phillips, Head of College of Human and Health Sciences and ARCH board member, said he was delighted the students were able to view the academy first hand in its first few weeks of opening. Prof Phillips said: “The Talent Bank and Health & Wellbeing Academy are just two of the projects being delivered through the ARCH partnership. We were delighted to welcome the students and realise widening access into health & life science sector education is a vital part of tackling the NHS’s workforce issues.

“ARCH is focusing on activity which will generate the workforce pipeline of the future – to achieve this we must educate our health professionals of tomorrow in a way which ensures those nurtured and trained here are likely to stay and work within the region.

“I believe Talent Bank is a positive step towards re-orientating the education system which can deliver a workforce with the right skills to deliver next generation healthcare.”

 

 

 

Amy Hodgson, aged 17, from Baglan, was the Talent Bank’s very first student. The Gower College student is studying A-level Maths, Biology and Physics.

Here Amy, a former Glanafan pupil, talks about her experiences as a Talent Bank student:

“I first heard about the Talent Bank programme during an open evening at the Institute of Life Science at Swansea University last year. I knew I wanted to study biology and physics at A-level but wasn’t sure what I could do with those qualifications once I left college.

 

I take my normal lessons at college then I am released into Talent Bank one day a week. There are about 12 of us on the pilot project and it’s really helped me get a better view of life beyond A-levels.

 

We have been able to get first-hand experience in both the NHS and industry. We have visited pathology in Singleton Hospital, been part of an NHS induction at Morriston Hospital and seen cardiology staff at work and also learned how to take blood in the simulation suite at Morriston’s Education Centre which was brilliant. It was also really interesting to see the new Health & Wellbeing Academy and the non-medical career options the College of Human and Health sciences offers.

 

We have also carried out an industry challenge on diabetes, looking at the causes, symptoms, treatment and research linked to diabetes. We were able to work with Cello Novo a diabetes firm who are creating an artificial pancreas which was really interesting.

I was lucky enough to have 2 day placement at Swansea University’s Centre of Nanotechnology at the Institute of Life Science. I didn’t even know that kind of research and development existed.

 

Talent Bank has helped me decide that I want to pursue a career in medical engineering and I am hoping to get work experience in ABMU’s specialist rehab unit in Morriston over the summer.

I also been paired with a health mentor thanks to the Mullany Trust. My mentor is a cruise ship doctor and we speak virtually in a safe and monitored way so I can find out more about other career options available in health and life sciences.

 

It’s been great to be immersed in university life too thanks to the Fujitsu Innovation Hub on the Bay Campus. I am definitely considering staying in Swansea to continue my education and I hope I can start my career in this area too.

 

Talent Bank has opened my eyes to the opportunities here in South West Wales and helped me rule out as much as rule in education and employment choices, which has been so helpful to me and my parents.”

 

For more information on joining the 2017 Talent Bank programme, there will be a free open evening held at Morriston Hospital’s Education Department on April 5, 5pm to 7pm, visit www.talentbank.wales

10 of 36

£95 million funding package announced to support NHS training and education

Physician Associates course gets 2017 funding

Health Secretary, Vaughan Gething, has announced a £95 million package to support a range of education and training programmes for healthcare professionals in Wales. The funding package includes an additional cohort of Physician Associate training places available from September 2017 at Swansea University Medical School.

This significant investment will support nurses, physiotherapists, radiographers and a range of health science training opportunities. It will enable more than 3000 new students to join those already studying healthcare education programs across Wales.

The funding builds on Welsh Government funding already in place for nursing, providing more than a 13% increase in nursing training places, on top of the 10% increase in 2016/17 and 22% increase in 2015/16. Midwifery training places will increase by 40%.

The support package will also provide an additional £500,000 to support community healthcare such as advanced practice, education and extended skills training to support primary care clusters.

There will also be a significant increase in practice nurse and district nurse education as well as audiology training places within primary and community settings. This will provide vital funding for community services and will ensure many more patients can be cared for closer to home, rather than in hospital.

Health Secretary, Vaughan Gething said: “We rely on the skills, knowledge and experience of those providing the care in the NHS on a daily basis.

“This includes nurses and paramedics as well as those behind the scenes, who provide vital support services such as laboratory tests to enable diagnoses to be made and “treatment to be provided.

“Education and training is fundamental to ensuring the sustainability of our workforce.

“This £95m  investment will ensure that our healthcare professionals are able to provide  high quality care now and in the future and that patients’ will be able to receive care closer to home.“

The funding package also includes an additional cohort of physician associate training places available from September 2017 with 12 of these places hosted by Bangor University and 20 hosted by Swansea University.

It will also support the integration of hospital and community pharmacy training into one programme.

Swansea University offers a midwifery course that currently has a 100 per cent employment success rate within six months of graduation.

Professor Ceri Phillips, head of the College of Human and Health Sciences at Swansea University, said: "It is the case that those who choose to study locally tend to take up employment opportunities in the region and we welcome the opportunity to contribute to increasing and developing the future workforce of the NHS within this part of Wales.

"The college provides programmes in both its Swansea and Carmarthen sites and the increase in student numbers will be embraced within both locations.

"The college is also very conscious of the excessive sums of money that are currently paid to agencies to offset the shortages in the current workforce and it is evident that, by educating and training more nurses, midwives and other healthcare professionals in the medium-term, these financial pressures will be reduced by a sustained commitment to increasing the supply of the trained workforce".

 

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean and Head of Swansea University Medical School, said: "I am very grateful to Welsh Government for funding the additional physician associate places so that we can train more people to deliver the NHS workforce for Wales."

 

11 of 36

£95 million funding package announced to support NHS training and education

Physician Associates course gets 2017 funding

Health Secretary, Vaughan Gething, has announced a £95 million package to support a range of education and training programmes for healthcare professionals in Wales. The funding package includes an additional cohort of Physician Associate training places available from September 2017 at Swansea University Medical School.

This significant investment will support nurses, physiotherapists, radiographers and a range of health science training opportunities. It will enable more than 3000 new students to join those already studying healthcare education programs across Wales.

The funding builds on Welsh Government funding already in place for nursing, providing more than a 13% increase in nursing training places, on top of the 10% increase in 2016/17 and 22% increase in 2015/16. Midwifery training places will increase by 40%.

The support package will also provide an additional £500,000 to support community healthcare such as advanced practice, education and extended skills training to support primary care clusters.

There will also be a significant increase in practice nurse and district nurse education as well as audiology training places within primary and community settings. This will provide vital funding for community services and will ensure many more patients can be cared for closer to home, rather than in hospital.

Health Secretary, Vaughan Gething said: “We rely on the skills, knowledge and experience of those providing the care in the NHS on a daily basis.

“This includes nurses and paramedics as well as those behind the scenes, who provide vital support services such as laboratory tests to enable diagnoses to be made and “treatment to be provided.

“Education and training is fundamental to ensuring the sustainability of our workforce.

“This £95m  investment will ensure that our healthcare professionals are able to provide  high quality care now and in the future and that patients’ will be able to receive care closer to home.“

The funding package also includes an additional cohort of physician associate training places available from September 2017 with 12 of these places hosted by Bangor University and 20 hosted by Swansea University.

It will also support the integration of hospital and community pharmacy training into one programme.

Swansea University offers a midwifery course that currently has a 100 per cent employment success rate within six months of graduation.

Professor Ceri Phillips, head of the College of Human and Health Sciences at Swansea University, said: "It is the case that those who choose to study locally tend to take up employment opportunities in the region and we welcome the opportunity to contribute to increasing and developing the future workforce of the NHS within this part of Wales.

"The college provides programmes in both its Swansea and Carmarthen sites and the increase in student numbers will be embraced within both locations.

"The college is also very conscious of the excessive sums of money that are currently paid to agencies to offset the shortages in the current workforce and it is evident that, by educating and training more nurses, midwives and other healthcare professionals in the medium-term, these financial pressures will be reduced by a sustained commitment to increasing the supply of the trained workforce".

 

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean and Head of Swansea University Medical School, said: "I am very grateful to Welsh Government for funding the additional physician associate places so that we can train more people to deliver the NHS workforce for Wales."

 

11 of 36

Health leaders delighted as Swansea Bay City Deal is given green light

Prime Minister signs £1.3bn City Deal in Swansea

Health and life science chiefs in South West Wales have welcomed the confirmation of the Swansea Bay City Region City Deal funding today from Westminster.

The City Deal is the biggest investment for South West Wales in a generation worth more than £1.3billion. The investment package aims to transform the economic landscape of the area with high-spec digital infrastructure and world-class facilities in the fields of health and life science innovation, energy and smart manufacturing.

The City Deal is expected to deliver nearly 10,000 new jobs and increase the value of goods and services produced in the region by £1.8billion.

Watch the ARCH City Deal video here

The Swansea Bay City Region includes the local authority areas of Carmarthenshire, Swansea, Pembrokeshire and Neath Port Talbot, joined by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, and private sector partners.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) forms the health and wellbeing strand of the City Deal.

ARCH is a unique partnership between ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards and Swansea University aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales. ARCH was formed to tackle some of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis. 

 

ABM University Health Board and ARCH chair Professor Andrew Davies has praised the news. He said: “We are delighted that the City Deal has been supported by Welsh Government and UK Government as this will help transform the health and economic opportunities of our region.

“The funding will also help us accelerate the development of health science campuses at Morriston and Singleton and the Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire.

“One of the strengths of ARCH has been its effectiveness as a vehicle for the three partners to develop joint solutions, which meet the challenges facing the health sector.

“The development of the City Deal will help us set the regional infrastructure and approach to support transformation in South West Wales.

“The Swansea Bay City Region is a bold vision which members of the ARCH Board have played a significant role in shaping.”

 

ABMU Medical Director and ARCH board member Professor Hamish Laing added that the announcement would help accelerate specific projects within ARCH aimed at creating an NHS fit for the 21st Century. Professor Laing said: “The announcement today is great news for our citizens and for our Health Board.

“This new money will help tackle some of the causes of illness and improve the wellbeing of our communities as well as seeing exciting developments in research, innovation and education alongside Morriston and Singleton Hospitals.

“The City Region team which presented our exciting ideas to government, led by Swansea Council’s Councillor Rob Stewart and Carmarthenshire Council’s Mark James, has done a great job in making the case for investment in the region.

As a health board we have digital ambitions which will be fundamental to a new way of providing healthcare.

“ARCH includes a strong digital component which seeks to build on the opportunities arising from the City Deal to set the regional infrastructure and approach to support service transformation. We believe they are fundamental to a new way of providing healthcare, and together across the region helping to create financial sustainability and empowering our citizens as well as delivering preventative advice and services to our population.”

Hywel Dda University Health Board chair and ARCH board member Bernardine Rees OBE said: “We are absolutely delighted with the outcome of the City Deal as it opens up so many opportunities for collaborative working which will improve patient experience here in the West.

“It's about collaboration not centralisation. Together working with patients, public and staff we can support both wellness and illness.

 “We welcome this new way of working across the region and as a health board realise the value regional working adds an attractor for new NHS and life science professionals to come and train, work and live here.”

City Deal partners have worked together for over a year to develop and submit a detailed proposal to the Welsh and UK Governments, with 11 specific projects spread across the region.

 

The announcement signalled the start of investment and development on an unprecedented scale. £241million of central government funding, split between the UK and Welsh Government, would be added to £360million of other public sector funding and £673million of private sector contributions to make up the total investment package.

Professor Marc Clement, ARCH board member and Swansea University’s Vice-President and Dean of School of Management, was part of the City Deal team who put the bid together. He said: “This City Deal will accelerate ARCH’s plans for Morriston and Singleton to become world-class health science campuses.

“The plans for Morriston include South Wales's third Institute of Life Science (ILS), creating a unique health & life science innovation environment.

“This City Deal will allow the ARCH partnership to tap into the decade of success delivered through Swansea University’s ILS. Morriston will become an environment where health & life science innovation can be encouraged, proven, embedded and taken to regional, national and global marketplaces.

 

“The reconfiguration of real estate within ABM University Health Board will facilitate expansion of Singleton Hospital and university campus into a second health science campus where a growing cluster of medical and other health technology companies and collaborations will be focused.”

 

The Singleton Health Campus will see the establishment of Swansea University’s Healthcare Technology Centre - a core component of the ARCH science park vision for Singleton. This second health campus will create significant new employment within high GVA sectors, the campuses will have complementary focus on technology and clinical innovation, supporting development across a broad range of technology readiness levels.

 

Professor Clement added: “The City Deal offers this region a huge opportunity to lead world-class medical research and capitalise on the growing cluster of innovative life science and healthcare companies in our area.

 

“We want to create an environment where health and life science innovation can be encouraged, proven, embedded and taken to regional, national and global marketplaces.”

Along with the health campus development projects, ARCH is planning to create a regional network of health & wellbeing schemes.  The schemes will ensure people can access the care and support they need in their communities to help reduce demand on a pressurised secondary care system.

The schemes aim to regenerate and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health and wellbeing.

 

Professor Clement added: “£40million of City Deal funding would be dedicated to the first of these schemes – the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village.

“The Carmarthenshire Council-led project in Delta Lakes  will create life science and health employment and investment opportunities. The village will be based around primary and community care facilities, and create an Institute of Life Science for Hywel Dda University Health Board, as well as education and skills development capability, and sport, leisure and tourism facilities.

“The village will see the integration of business development, education, wellness initiatives, research and development and healthcare.

“By working together we know we can create a region which can attract new partnerships, new investment and become a leader in life science innovation and research.”

12 of 36

Health leaders delighted as Swansea Bay City Deal is given green light

Prime Minister signs £1.3bn City Deal in Swansea

Health and life science chiefs in South West Wales have welcomed the confirmation of the Swansea Bay City Region City Deal funding today from Westminster.

The City Deal is the biggest investment for South West Wales in a generation worth more than £1.3billion. The investment package aims to transform the economic landscape of the area with high-spec digital infrastructure and world-class facilities in the fields of health and life science innovation, energy and smart manufacturing.

The City Deal is expected to deliver nearly 10,000 new jobs and increase the value of goods and services produced in the region by £1.8billion.

Watch the ARCH City Deal video here

The Swansea Bay City Region includes the local authority areas of Carmarthenshire, Swansea, Pembrokeshire and Neath Port Talbot, joined by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda University Health Boards, Swansea University and the University of Wales Trinity St David’s, and private sector partners.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) forms the health and wellbeing strand of the City Deal.

ARCH is a unique partnership between ABM and Hywel Dda University Health Boards and Swansea University aimed at improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales. ARCH was formed to tackle some of the major challenges the health service faces on a daily basis. 

 

ABM University Health Board and ARCH chair Professor Andrew Davies has praised the news. He said: “We are delighted that the City Deal has been supported by Welsh Government and UK Government as this will help transform the health and economic opportunities of our region.

“The funding will also help us accelerate the development of health science campuses at Morriston and Singleton and the Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire.

“One of the strengths of ARCH has been its effectiveness as a vehicle for the three partners to develop joint solutions, which meet the challenges facing the health sector.

“The development of the City Deal will help us set the regional infrastructure and approach to support transformation in South West Wales.

“The Swansea Bay City Region is a bold vision which members of the ARCH Board have played a significant role in shaping.”

 

ABMU Medical Director and ARCH board member Professor Hamish Laing added that the announcement would help accelerate specific projects within ARCH aimed at creating an NHS fit for the 21st Century. Professor Laing said: “The announcement today is great news for our citizens and for our Health Board.

“This new money will help tackle some of the causes of illness and improve the wellbeing of our communities as well as seeing exciting developments in research, innovation and education alongside Morriston and Singleton Hospitals.

“The City Region team which presented our exciting ideas to government, led by Swansea Council’s Councillor Rob Stewart and Carmarthenshire Council’s Mark James, has done a great job in making the case for investment in the region.

As a health board we have digital ambitions which will be fundamental to a new way of providing healthcare.

“ARCH includes a strong digital component which seeks to build on the opportunities arising from the City Deal to set the regional infrastructure and approach to support service transformation. We believe they are fundamental to a new way of providing healthcare, and together across the region helping to create financial sustainability and empowering our citizens as well as delivering preventative advice and services to our population.”

Hywel Dda University Health Board chair and ARCH board member Bernardine Rees OBE said: “We are absolutely delighted with the outcome of the City Deal as it opens up so many opportunities for collaborative working which will improve patient experience here in the West.

“It's about collaboration not centralisation. Together working with patients, public and staff we can support both wellness and illness.

 “We welcome this new way of working across the region and as a health board realise the value regional working adds an attractor for new NHS and life science professionals to come and train, work and live here.”

City Deal partners have worked together for over a year to develop and submit a detailed proposal to the Welsh and UK Governments, with 11 specific projects spread across the region.

 

The announcement signalled the start of investment and development on an unprecedented scale. £241million of central government funding, split between the UK and Welsh Government, would be added to £360million of other public sector funding and £673million of private sector contributions to make up the total investment package.

Professor Marc Clement, ARCH board member and Swansea University’s Vice-President and Dean of School of Management, was part of the City Deal team who put the bid together. He said: “This City Deal will accelerate ARCH’s plans for Morriston and Singleton to become world-class health science campuses.

“The plans for Morriston include South Wales's third Institute of Life Science (ILS), creating a unique health & life science innovation environment.

“This City Deal will allow the ARCH partnership to tap into the decade of success delivered through Swansea University’s ILS. Morriston will become an environment where health & life science innovation can be encouraged, proven, embedded and taken to regional, national and global marketplaces.

 

“The reconfiguration of real estate within ABM University Health Board will facilitate expansion of Singleton Hospital and university campus into a second health science campus where a growing cluster of medical and other health technology companies and collaborations will be focused.”

 

The Singleton Health Campus will see the establishment of Swansea University’s Healthcare Technology Centre - a core component of the ARCH science park vision for Singleton. This second health campus will create significant new employment within high GVA sectors, the campuses will have complementary focus on technology and clinical innovation, supporting development across a broad range of technology readiness levels.

 

Professor Clement added: “The City Deal offers this region a huge opportunity to lead world-class medical research and capitalise on the growing cluster of innovative life science and healthcare companies in our area.

 

“We want to create an environment where health and life science innovation can be encouraged, proven, embedded and taken to regional, national and global marketplaces.”

Along with the health campus development projects, ARCH is planning to create a regional network of health & wellbeing schemes.  The schemes will ensure people can access the care and support they need in their communities to help reduce demand on a pressurised secondary care system.

The schemes aim to regenerate and breathe life back into communities, providing improved educational and employment opportunities – the two most powerful determinants of health and wellbeing.

 

Professor Clement added: “£40million of City Deal funding would be dedicated to the first of these schemes – the Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village.

“The Carmarthenshire Council-led project in Delta Lakes  will create life science and health employment and investment opportunities. The village will be based around primary and community care facilities, and create an Institute of Life Science for Hywel Dda University Health Board, as well as education and skills development capability, and sport, leisure and tourism facilities.

“The village will see the integration of business development, education, wellness initiatives, research and development and healthcare.

“By working together we know we can create a region which can attract new partnerships, new investment and become a leader in life science innovation and research.”

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Masterplan funding announced for Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village

Welsh Government announces it will fund the Masterplan for the ARCH and Carmarthenshire Council Delta Lakes Wellness and Life Science project.

PLANS for a unique Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire are pushing forward.

Welsh Government announces it will fund the Masterplan for the ARCH and Carmarthenshire Council Delta Lakes Wellness and Life Science project. Welsh Government has also agreed to vary the terms of the Llanelli Coast Joint Venture agreement with Carmarthenshire Council to formally include the proposed development, subject to an agreed business plan.

The Wellness and Life Science Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellbeing – partnering first-class health, research and life science, with innovative leisure opportunities to help people live healthy lives.

The proposed multi-million pound development earmarked for Delta Lakes is being led by Carmarthenshire Council. It forms part of the ARCH initiative being taken forward by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda Health Boards and Swansea University. It is also one of the projects highlighted in the Swansea Bay City Region City Deal document.

The Masterplan study will build on the feasibility study that is currently being undertaken.

 

Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Economy Ken Skates said: “The Wellness and Life Science Village is an innovative proposal with the potential to make an impact on the health and well being of residents. It is also designed to boost the region’s economy and skills base in a sustainable way while supporting the regeneration of the area. I am pleased to announce funding for a masterplan and associated business case to take the project forward.”

 

Carmarthenshire councillor Meryl Gravell, chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, said: “This scheme is really making progress, the appointment of the project manager and the funding for the feasibility study are significant steps in this development.

“It is an ambitious and unique scheme, which will not only be aimed at improving the health and well-being of people across the region, but will also boost the economy and provide high quality jobs.”

This project is a first for the country and brings together health, science and enterprise to regenerate the area and also help people live healthier lives for longer.

The project concept was derived last year from work undertaken by under ARCH alongside Carmarthenshire Council. The village could see lifestyle and leisure facilities, primary and community-based healthcare and specialist residential care integrated with university research and education space. There will also be business facilities to encourage economic growth.

A feasibility study, funded by the Welsh Government, is currently being carried out for the scheme at Delta Lakes. The site, adjacent to the coastline, has been chosen as the perfect place to deliver the project, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs.

The concept of a Wellness and Life Science Village followed talks on plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli and the council’s desire to work collaboratively with health partners, putting additional investment into facilities and services to help prevent ill-health and reduce pressure on frontline health care.

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Masterplan funding announced for Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village

Welsh Government announces it will fund the Masterplan for the ARCH and Carmarthenshire Council Delta Lakes Wellness and Life Science project.

PLANS for a unique Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire are pushing forward.

Welsh Government announces it will fund the Masterplan for the ARCH and Carmarthenshire Council Delta Lakes Wellness and Life Science project. Welsh Government has also agreed to vary the terms of the Llanelli Coast Joint Venture agreement with Carmarthenshire Council to formally include the proposed development, subject to an agreed business plan.

The Wellness and Life Science Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellbeing – partnering first-class health, research and life science, with innovative leisure opportunities to help people live healthy lives.

The proposed multi-million pound development earmarked for Delta Lakes is being led by Carmarthenshire Council. It forms part of the ARCH initiative being taken forward by Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda Health Boards and Swansea University. It is also one of the projects highlighted in the Swansea Bay City Region City Deal document.

The Masterplan study will build on the feasibility study that is currently being undertaken.

 

Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Economy Ken Skates said: “The Wellness and Life Science Village is an innovative proposal with the potential to make an impact on the health and well being of residents. It is also designed to boost the region’s economy and skills base in a sustainable way while supporting the regeneration of the area. I am pleased to announce funding for a masterplan and associated business case to take the project forward.”

 

Carmarthenshire councillor Meryl Gravell, chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, said: “This scheme is really making progress, the appointment of the project manager and the funding for the feasibility study are significant steps in this development.

“It is an ambitious and unique scheme, which will not only be aimed at improving the health and well-being of people across the region, but will also boost the economy and provide high quality jobs.”

This project is a first for the country and brings together health, science and enterprise to regenerate the area and also help people live healthier lives for longer.

The project concept was derived last year from work undertaken by under ARCH alongside Carmarthenshire Council. The village could see lifestyle and leisure facilities, primary and community-based healthcare and specialist residential care integrated with university research and education space. There will also be business facilities to encourage economic growth.

A feasibility study, funded by the Welsh Government, is currently being carried out for the scheme at Delta Lakes. The site, adjacent to the coastline, has been chosen as the perfect place to deliver the project, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs.

The concept of a Wellness and Life Science Village followed talks on plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli and the council’s desire to work collaboratively with health partners, putting additional investment into facilities and services to help prevent ill-health and reduce pressure on frontline health care.

13 of 36

New project team appointed to drive forward Wellness & Life Science Village

The project, which is estimated to cost in excess of £100million, is being delivered through the work of the Swansea Bay City Region and ARCH partnership, will be sited at Llanelli’s Delta Lakes.

A NEW project team has been appointed to drive forward plans for the unique Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire.

The project, which is estimated to cost in excess of £100million, is being delivered through the work of the Swansea Bay City Region and ARCH partnership, will be sited at Llanelli’s Delta Lakes.

Work has begun to detail what will be included at the site, elements which may be included are a wellness-based leisure centre, hydrotherapy pool, research facilities, a Health & Wellbeing Centre, hotel and conferencing and high spec business facilities and a Health and Wellbeing Academy. 

The new team tasked with delivering the vision are all Carmarthenshire residents. Project manager Dr Sharon Burford, lives with her husband in Mynyddygarreg and works for Hywel Dda Health Board. Dr Burford will be  supported by Steffan Jenkins, from Llangennech, and Bjorn Rodde, who lives in Llwynhendy.

Sharon, who was the management lead for the development of the new model of care in Prince Philip Hospital, said: “I feel the focus on improving health and wellbeing in this area has the potential to make a real difference.

“By working in partnership we now have the opportunity to bring together the right partners to help create the right environment for health innovation to flourish alongside private and public sector partners.

“We also want to challenge our view of healthcare by focusing on wellness and not on illness. This unique approach will allow us to  take the lead in innovative thinking around improving wellness.”

Steffan, who was born a few miles from the Delta Lakes site in Pontiets, now lives  in Llangennech with his wife and twin daughters. A qualified engineer, chartered surveyor and environmental manager, he has worked for Carmarthenshire Council for the past 12 years in its economic development division, on major projects such as the largest land reclamation project in the UK – the hugely successful Millennium Coastal Park.

Steffan said: “To be involved in this new venture is a fantastic opportunity and a challenge I am delighted to be a part of.

“It will be without doubt a truly transformational project for the area and for the people of Llanelli and the region. In fact, it will be a project of national significance, a once in a lifetime project which will without question benefit many generations to come.”  

Bjorn, who lives in Llwynhendy with his wife and two daughters, worked for the past three years as a senior lecturer for Swansea University in the Medical School and the School of Management, and has also spent the last 18 months as a senior project manager on the ARCH programme.

Bjorn added:  “The impact it will have on Llanelli is huge,” he said. “The best thing about this project is the joint ambition - no one is forcing us to do this; it is a fantastic vision and all the partners are fully on board with what we are trying to achieve.

“ARCH’s vision is to encourage collaboration to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales, the Delta Lake project is an early indication of what can be achieved by working in partnership.”

 

What is a Wellness and Life Science Village?

This project is a first for the country and brings together health, science and enterprise to regenerate the area and also help people live healthier lives for longer.

The project concept was derived last year from work undertaken by under ARCH alongside Carmarthenshire Council. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. By coming together the three organisations are aiming to transform the way healthcare is delivered in South West Wales. ARCH brings together the health service and innovation and research to find a new way of meeting the challenges the NHS faces.

The village could see lifestyle and leisure facilities, primary and community-based healthcare and specialist residential care integrated with university research and education space. There will also be business facilities to encourage economic growth.

A feasibility study, funded by the Welsh Government, is currently being carried out for the scheme at Delta Lakes. The site, adjacent to the coastline, has been chosen as the perfect place to deliver the project, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs.

Unique to Wales, the Wellness and Life Science Village was cited in the Swansea Bay City Region’s City Deal bid to the UK Government and noted in the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Spring Budget.

 

View footage of the site:

 

An aerial view of the site can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8iNZH5r8Os It includes footage of the coastline and neighbouring areas, giving a clear view of the Delta Lakes site and where it sits within the surrounding environment.

 

14 of 36

New project team appointed to drive forward Wellness & Life Science Village

The project, which is estimated to cost in excess of £100million, is being delivered through the work of the Swansea Bay City Region and ARCH partnership, will be sited at Llanelli’s Delta Lakes.

A NEW project team has been appointed to drive forward plans for the unique Wellness and Life Science Village in Carmarthenshire.

The project, which is estimated to cost in excess of £100million, is being delivered through the work of the Swansea Bay City Region and ARCH partnership, will be sited at Llanelli’s Delta Lakes.

Work has begun to detail what will be included at the site, elements which may be included are a wellness-based leisure centre, hydrotherapy pool, research facilities, a Health & Wellbeing Centre, hotel and conferencing and high spec business facilities and a Health and Wellbeing Academy. 

The new team tasked with delivering the vision are all Carmarthenshire residents. Project manager Dr Sharon Burford, lives with her husband in Mynyddygarreg and works for Hywel Dda Health Board. Dr Burford will be  supported by Steffan Jenkins, from Llangennech, and Bjorn Rodde, who lives in Llwynhendy.

Sharon, who was the management lead for the development of the new model of care in Prince Philip Hospital, said: “I feel the focus on improving health and wellbeing in this area has the potential to make a real difference.

“By working in partnership we now have the opportunity to bring together the right partners to help create the right environment for health innovation to flourish alongside private and public sector partners.

“We also want to challenge our view of healthcare by focusing on wellness and not on illness. This unique approach will allow us to  take the lead in innovative thinking around improving wellness.”

Steffan, who was born a few miles from the Delta Lakes site in Pontiets, now lives  in Llangennech with his wife and twin daughters. A qualified engineer, chartered surveyor and environmental manager, he has worked for Carmarthenshire Council for the past 12 years in its economic development division, on major projects such as the largest land reclamation project in the UK – the hugely successful Millennium Coastal Park.

Steffan said: “To be involved in this new venture is a fantastic opportunity and a challenge I am delighted to be a part of.

“It will be without doubt a truly transformational project for the area and for the people of Llanelli and the region. In fact, it will be a project of national significance, a once in a lifetime project which will without question benefit many generations to come.”  

Bjorn, who lives in Llwynhendy with his wife and two daughters, worked for the past three years as a senior lecturer for Swansea University in the Medical School and the School of Management, and has also spent the last 18 months as a senior project manager on the ARCH programme.

Bjorn added:  “The impact it will have on Llanelli is huge,” he said. “The best thing about this project is the joint ambition - no one is forcing us to do this; it is a fantastic vision and all the partners are fully on board with what we are trying to achieve.

“ARCH’s vision is to encourage collaboration to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales, the Delta Lake project is an early indication of what can be achieved by working in partnership.”

 

What is a Wellness and Life Science Village?

This project is a first for the country and brings together health, science and enterprise to regenerate the area and also help people live healthier lives for longer.

The project concept was derived last year from work undertaken by under ARCH alongside Carmarthenshire Council. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. By coming together the three organisations are aiming to transform the way healthcare is delivered in South West Wales. ARCH brings together the health service and innovation and research to find a new way of meeting the challenges the NHS faces.

The village could see lifestyle and leisure facilities, primary and community-based healthcare and specialist residential care integrated with university research and education space. There will also be business facilities to encourage economic growth.

A feasibility study, funded by the Welsh Government, is currently being carried out for the scheme at Delta Lakes. The site, adjacent to the coastline, has been chosen as the perfect place to deliver the project, which is expected to create 1,000 jobs.

Unique to Wales, the Wellness and Life Science Village was cited in the Swansea Bay City Region’s City Deal bid to the UK Government and noted in the Chancellor of the Exchequer’s Spring Budget.

 

View footage of the site:

 

An aerial view of the site can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8iNZH5r8Os It includes footage of the coastline and neighbouring areas, giving a clear view of the Delta Lakes site and where it sits within the surrounding environment.

 

14 of 36

ARCH Festival of Innovation event gets new Economy Minister’s seal of approval

As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.

Innovation is changing the way we live and South West Wales is proving to be leading innovation in health and life sciences.

As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.

ARCH (Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. The ARCH partners are bringing together health and science to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales and  transform the way healthcare is delivered.

Innovation is one of the cornerstones of ARCH’s aims.

To celebrate ARCH’s revolutionary approach, and to showcase the innovation driving this work, there is a free Festival of Innovation event being held at Swansea University’s Singleton Campus later this month.

Swansea University’s Head of the College of Human and Health Science, Professor Ceri Phillips, who is also a member of the ARCH Programme Board, said: “ARCH is bringing together health and science to transform the NHS in this region. We are also working together to train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders, and also help the local economy to thrive by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

“The ARCH partners are collaborating to create a new image of healthcare provision.  This free event brings together leading experts to showcase what's coming next, and how the region and indeed Wales is leading the way in crafting a new health and social care system that is fit for the needs of the 21st century. 

“Our aim is simple, we want to showcase what this region has to offer. We have so many talented people leading the way through innovation, through our first class academia for education and training, for research and development and for developing innovative that will contribute to the establishment and development of new models for health and wellbeing.”

The Festival, which has events taking place across Wales between June 20 and July 1, is designed to provide the public with the rare opportunity to view first-hand how Wales is at the forefront of enabling technologies which underpin key industry sectors.

Welsh Government Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Ken Skates added: “The festival aims to support the exchange of ideas and concepts which could create collaborations and inspire a new generation of innovative products, solutions and cultural endeavours.

“We are delighted the innovative ARCH partnership is providing a free day full of amazing innovation and research by bringing together an impressive line up of speakers who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in Wales.”

Topics covered during the day on Wednesday, June 29, will include the revolutionary area of Precision Medicine which is transforming the way cancer is treated, an insight into ground-breaking research taking place at Swansea University in brain science which could see an end to low moods caused by stress and innovation taking place around autism and diabetes.

Leighton Phillips, Swansea University’s advisor on health, added: “There will be the opportunity to discuss the innovation taking place with these leading experts in their field and network with these innovators.

Collaboration, underpinned by academic innovation and excellence, is vital if we are to fundamentally change the health of our region and how their healthcare is delivered. This event will give people the chance to speak directly to those people in this transformation.”

The ARCH Festival of Innovation day takes place on Wednesday, June 29, from 8.30am-5pm at the Seminar Room at ILS1 on Singleton Campus. You can attend the whole day or the session which interest you most. To register for the free event visit www.eventbrite.co.uk and search A Regional Collaboration for Health. For other festival of Innovation events taking place visit www.festivalofinnovation.org

15 of 36

ARCH Festival of Innovation event gets new Economy Minister’s seal of approval

As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.

Innovation is changing the way we live and South West Wales is proving to be leading innovation in health and life sciences.

As part of the Welsh Government’s 2016 Wales Festival of Innovation, the ARCH partnership is bringing together an impressive line up of experts who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in this region.

ARCH (Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. The ARCH partners are bringing together health and science to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of South West Wales and  transform the way healthcare is delivered.

Innovation is one of the cornerstones of ARCH’s aims.

To celebrate ARCH’s revolutionary approach, and to showcase the innovation driving this work, there is a free Festival of Innovation event being held at Swansea University’s Singleton Campus later this month.

Swansea University’s Head of the College of Human and Health Science, Professor Ceri Phillips, who is also a member of the ARCH Programme Board, said: “ARCH is bringing together health and science to transform the NHS in this region. We are also working together to train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders, and also help the local economy to thrive by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

“The ARCH partners are collaborating to create a new image of healthcare provision.  This free event brings together leading experts to showcase what's coming next, and how the region and indeed Wales is leading the way in crafting a new health and social care system that is fit for the needs of the 21st century. 

“Our aim is simple, we want to showcase what this region has to offer. We have so many talented people leading the way through innovation, through our first class academia for education and training, for research and development and for developing innovative that will contribute to the establishment and development of new models for health and wellbeing.”

The Festival, which has events taking place across Wales between June 20 and July 1, is designed to provide the public with the rare opportunity to view first-hand how Wales is at the forefront of enabling technologies which underpin key industry sectors.

Welsh Government Cabinet Secretary for Economy and Infrastructure Ken Skates added: “The festival aims to support the exchange of ideas and concepts which could create collaborations and inspire a new generation of innovative products, solutions and cultural endeavours.

“We are delighted the innovative ARCH partnership is providing a free day full of amazing innovation and research by bringing together an impressive line up of speakers who are all helping to shape the future of healthcare in Wales.”

Topics covered during the day on Wednesday, June 29, will include the revolutionary area of Precision Medicine which is transforming the way cancer is treated, an insight into ground-breaking research taking place at Swansea University in brain science which could see an end to low moods caused by stress and innovation taking place around autism and diabetes.

Leighton Phillips, Swansea University’s advisor on health, added: “There will be the opportunity to discuss the innovation taking place with these leading experts in their field and network with these innovators.

Collaboration, underpinned by academic innovation and excellence, is vital if we are to fundamentally change the health of our region and how their healthcare is delivered. This event will give people the chance to speak directly to those people in this transformation.”

The ARCH Festival of Innovation day takes place on Wednesday, June 29, from 8.30am-5pm at the Seminar Room at ILS1 on Singleton Campus. You can attend the whole day or the session which interest you most. To register for the free event visit www.eventbrite.co.uk and search A Regional Collaboration for Health. For other festival of Innovation events taking place visit www.festivalofinnovation.org

15 of 36

‘We can be global leader in clinical trials & transform patient’s lives’

Why are clinical trials so important?

269 years ago the first ever clinical trial was carried out, looking into the link between vitamin C and scurvy. Since then clinical trials have developed into a vital tool for healthcare. To celebrate the importance of James Lind’s pioneering work, each year on May 20 International Clinical Trials Day is held.

Lind's experiments in 1747 were run under very different conditions to today. He was serving as a surgeon on HMS Salisbury. His trial consisted of just 12 men, grouped into pairs and given a variety of dietary supplements from cider to oranges and lemons. The trial only lasted six days but, within that time, there was a noticeable improvement in the group eating the fruit, providing Lind with evidence of the link between citrus fruits and scurvy. Now almost 300 years after this breakthrough work, why is research in healthcare still so important and how does it benefit patients today?

A clinical trial is a type of clinical research that compares one treatment with another. It may involve patients or healthy people, or both. Small studies produce less reliable results than large ones, so studies often have to be carried out on a large number of people before the results are considered sufficiently reliable.

Doctors and other healthcare professionals and patients need evidence from clinical trials to know which treatments work best. Without this evidence, there is a risk that people could be given treatments that have no advantage, waste NHS resources, and might even be harmful.

Clinical trials help to find out if treatments are safe, if they have any side effects and if new treatments are better than the standard available treatments.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU Health Board’s Assistant Medical Director (Research and Development), says International Clinical Trials Day is a great way to help people understand the importance of this type of research work.

Professor Bain said: “International Clinical Trials Day is a great opportunity to celebrate the crucial role of research and clinical trials to the NHS.  From paracetamol and chemotherapy to treatments for depression and diabetes -without research, many of the treatments and types of care that we receive today just wouldn’t be available.

“And members of the public have an essential role to play, since without people agreeing to take part in research studies these improved treatments and care wouldn’t exist.”

And South West Wales’s reputation for clinical research excellence is growing through the ambitious aims of the ARCH Programme. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health), is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards.

Through ARCH, there are plans to expand the clinical trials and research activity across the entire region of South West Wales. The Joint Clinical Research Facility (J-CRF), which is currently shared by Swansea University and ABMU health board, undertakes patient research and serves a population of 500,000. Through the ARCH partnership, this benefit will extend to almost 1 million people.

Professor Bain explains: “Through the ambitions of ARCH, our patients and staff can gain great benefits from an expanded clinical research environment. We have existing J-CRF activity at Singleton, Morriston and Prince Philip hospitals, but through the collaborative approach of ARCH, we now have plans to expand this activity across the entire region.

“The J-CRF provides an important platform for translation of research into clinical innovation for meaningful patient benefit. This expansion will all us to undertake a broader and much larger portfolio of projects ranging from pharmaceutical to medical device innovation.

“What makes the ARCH region special is its unusually stable population of around a million people, many with chronic illnesses which plague the modern world such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This combination is potentially a huge draw for research and development companies, meaning that as well as the benefits to the NHS, in terms of better availability of leading technologies and therapies, the expansion will boost economic growth through potential investment from industry partners.

“We will be able to maximise the potential of the 1 million ARCH population to position this region, and indeed Wales, as a leader in championing clinical research within the NHS.”

Professor Bain added that Swansea already has a good track record of working with new drugs for treating diabetes: “We already see ourselves as a leading centre and already attract work from global pharmaceutical companies. Hopefully, the development of ARCH will lead to an upscaling of our activities so we can become a major player in the global search for new medicines.

“Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, ARCH gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales.  If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy.”

The J-CRF in Swansea was established in 1990 and has a team of highly trained research nursing staff and an excellent track record for recruitment and randomisation. Kathie Wareham, director of clinical research at J-CRF, said: “We are fortunate here in South West Wales to have vibrant research departments which allows our patients participate in the development of future medicines and devices.

“Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the university’s medical school, they save the NHS money because the medicines are provided free by the companies trying to license them. Having people on these trials also frees up places within hospitals so NHS patients can be treated more quickly.”

Dr Phil Kloer, Hywel Dda’s medical director and ARCH lead, explains how valuable this sort of work is to the NHS in terms of treatments but also how they can help people stay well without medical intervention. Dr Kloer said: “Clinical trials can help us learn how to prevent illnesses by testing a vaccine for example, detect or diagnose illnesses by testing a scan or blood test, treat illnesses by testing new or existing medicines, find out how best to provide psychological support and also importantly help find out how people can control their symptoms or improve their quality of life – for example, by testing how a particular diet or activity affects a condition.”

But Dr Kloer also stressed the rigorous protocols around clinical trials to ensure safety is paramount at all times: “Trials follow a set of rules, known as a protocol, to ensure they are well designed and as safe as possible, they measure the right things in the right way, and the results are meaningful. All trials are closely monitored.”

Clinical research is funded through a number of routes, Welsh Government funds research in Wales through Health and Care Research Wales and each health board has a budget for R&D. Dr Jon Bisson, director of Health and Care Research Wales, said Wales has a huge role to play in delivering clinical trials research.

Dr Bisson said: “Clinical Trials Units offer expertise in specialist trial design, conduct and analysis to researchers in Wales and beyond. They facilitate high-quality, timely and successful trial conduct and ensure regulatory and governance requirements are met.

“Through Health and Care Research Wales, the Welsh Government is investing in Clinical Trials Units including Swansea Trials Unit (STU). International Clinical Trials Day is a great way to showcase the work going on here in Wales.”

Swansea Trials Unit (STU), which is based at Swansea University’s Medical School on the Singleton Campus, works closely with researchers rather than the industry & patient facing work carried out at J-CRF.  The Swansea unit has run nearly 40 trials valued at more than £20 million.

STU manager Gail Holland added: “We aim to improve the health of the people of South West Wales and beyond by enhancing the number, progress and quality of trials, with particular reference to secondary and emergency care.

“Thanks to funding from Health and Care Research Wales we are able to provide training to build capacity in clinical trials. We also offer advice and support for trial design, regulation, recruitment, data collection, management and analysis.”

Dr Bisson added: “We want more people to understand the value and importance of clinical trials and research and hopefully they will consider taking part. Without members of the public taking part in research, improvements to treatments and care cannot be made.

“By taking part in a research study, you could benefit future generations and play a really important role in medical progress.”

To find out more about clinical trials you can attend Health and Care Research Wales’s free event at Swansea’s Waterfront Museum on Friday, May 20 from 12pm to 2pm to mark International Clinical Trials Day.

16 of 36

‘We can be global leader in clinical trials & transform patient’s lives’

Why are clinical trials so important?

269 years ago the first ever clinical trial was carried out, looking into the link between vitamin C and scurvy. Since then clinical trials have developed into a vital tool for healthcare. To celebrate the importance of James Lind’s pioneering work, each year on May 20 International Clinical Trials Day is held.

Lind's experiments in 1747 were run under very different conditions to today. He was serving as a surgeon on HMS Salisbury. His trial consisted of just 12 men, grouped into pairs and given a variety of dietary supplements from cider to oranges and lemons. The trial only lasted six days but, within that time, there was a noticeable improvement in the group eating the fruit, providing Lind with evidence of the link between citrus fruits and scurvy. Now almost 300 years after this breakthrough work, why is research in healthcare still so important and how does it benefit patients today?

A clinical trial is a type of clinical research that compares one treatment with another. It may involve patients or healthy people, or both. Small studies produce less reliable results than large ones, so studies often have to be carried out on a large number of people before the results are considered sufficiently reliable.

Doctors and other healthcare professionals and patients need evidence from clinical trials to know which treatments work best. Without this evidence, there is a risk that people could be given treatments that have no advantage, waste NHS resources, and might even be harmful.

Clinical trials help to find out if treatments are safe, if they have any side effects and if new treatments are better than the standard available treatments.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU Health Board’s Assistant Medical Director (Research and Development), says International Clinical Trials Day is a great way to help people understand the importance of this type of research work.

Professor Bain said: “International Clinical Trials Day is a great opportunity to celebrate the crucial role of research and clinical trials to the NHS.  From paracetamol and chemotherapy to treatments for depression and diabetes -without research, many of the treatments and types of care that we receive today just wouldn’t be available.

“And members of the public have an essential role to play, since without people agreeing to take part in research studies these improved treatments and care wouldn’t exist.”

And South West Wales’s reputation for clinical research excellence is growing through the ambitious aims of the ARCH Programme. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health), is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards.

Through ARCH, there are plans to expand the clinical trials and research activity across the entire region of South West Wales. The Joint Clinical Research Facility (J-CRF), which is currently shared by Swansea University and ABMU health board, undertakes patient research and serves a population of 500,000. Through the ARCH partnership, this benefit will extend to almost 1 million people.

Professor Bain explains: “Through the ambitions of ARCH, our patients and staff can gain great benefits from an expanded clinical research environment. We have existing J-CRF activity at Singleton, Morriston and Prince Philip hospitals, but through the collaborative approach of ARCH, we now have plans to expand this activity across the entire region.

“The J-CRF provides an important platform for translation of research into clinical innovation for meaningful patient benefit. This expansion will all us to undertake a broader and much larger portfolio of projects ranging from pharmaceutical to medical device innovation.

“What makes the ARCH region special is its unusually stable population of around a million people, many with chronic illnesses which plague the modern world such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This combination is potentially a huge draw for research and development companies, meaning that as well as the benefits to the NHS, in terms of better availability of leading technologies and therapies, the expansion will boost economic growth through potential investment from industry partners.

“We will be able to maximise the potential of the 1 million ARCH population to position this region, and indeed Wales, as a leader in championing clinical research within the NHS.”

Professor Bain added that Swansea already has a good track record of working with new drugs for treating diabetes: “We already see ourselves as a leading centre and already attract work from global pharmaceutical companies. Hopefully, the development of ARCH will lead to an upscaling of our activities so we can become a major player in the global search for new medicines.

“Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, ARCH gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales.  If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy.”

The J-CRF in Swansea was established in 1990 and has a team of highly trained research nursing staff and an excellent track record for recruitment and randomisation. Kathie Wareham, director of clinical research at J-CRF, said: “We are fortunate here in South West Wales to have vibrant research departments which allows our patients participate in the development of future medicines and devices.

“Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the university’s medical school, they save the NHS money because the medicines are provided free by the companies trying to license them. Having people on these trials also frees up places within hospitals so NHS patients can be treated more quickly.”

Dr Phil Kloer, Hywel Dda’s medical director and ARCH lead, explains how valuable this sort of work is to the NHS in terms of treatments but also how they can help people stay well without medical intervention. Dr Kloer said: “Clinical trials can help us learn how to prevent illnesses by testing a vaccine for example, detect or diagnose illnesses by testing a scan or blood test, treat illnesses by testing new or existing medicines, find out how best to provide psychological support and also importantly help find out how people can control their symptoms or improve their quality of life – for example, by testing how a particular diet or activity affects a condition.”

But Dr Kloer also stressed the rigorous protocols around clinical trials to ensure safety is paramount at all times: “Trials follow a set of rules, known as a protocol, to ensure they are well designed and as safe as possible, they measure the right things in the right way, and the results are meaningful. All trials are closely monitored.”

Clinical research is funded through a number of routes, Welsh Government funds research in Wales through Health and Care Research Wales and each health board has a budget for R&D. Dr Jon Bisson, director of Health and Care Research Wales, said Wales has a huge role to play in delivering clinical trials research.

Dr Bisson said: “Clinical Trials Units offer expertise in specialist trial design, conduct and analysis to researchers in Wales and beyond. They facilitate high-quality, timely and successful trial conduct and ensure regulatory and governance requirements are met.

“Through Health and Care Research Wales, the Welsh Government is investing in Clinical Trials Units including Swansea Trials Unit (STU). International Clinical Trials Day is a great way to showcase the work going on here in Wales.”

Swansea Trials Unit (STU), which is based at Swansea University’s Medical School on the Singleton Campus, works closely with researchers rather than the industry & patient facing work carried out at J-CRF.  The Swansea unit has run nearly 40 trials valued at more than £20 million.

STU manager Gail Holland added: “We aim to improve the health of the people of South West Wales and beyond by enhancing the number, progress and quality of trials, with particular reference to secondary and emergency care.

“Thanks to funding from Health and Care Research Wales we are able to provide training to build capacity in clinical trials. We also offer advice and support for trial design, regulation, recruitment, data collection, management and analysis.”

Dr Bisson added: “We want more people to understand the value and importance of clinical trials and research and hopefully they will consider taking part. Without members of the public taking part in research, improvements to treatments and care cannot be made.

“By taking part in a research study, you could benefit future generations and play a really important role in medical progress.”

To find out more about clinical trials you can attend Health and Care Research Wales’s free event at Swansea’s Waterfront Museum on Friday, May 20 from 12pm to 2pm to mark International Clinical Trials Day.

16 of 36

Clinical trials provide a healthy living for Swansea taxi driver

A Swansea cabbie’s livelihood is certainly in good health thanks to clinical trials taking place in the city.

Self-employed Dave Thompson is kept so busy ferrying patients around he doesn’t just making a living out of it – he gives other drivers a helping hand by putting work their way too.

Clinical trials, or research studies, are carried out in a partnership between ABMU Health Board and Swansea University Medical School.

They involve new medicines or devices that are being licensed and are trialled on patients, who have agreed to take part, to determine whether they are safe and more effective than current treatments.

Pharmaceutical companies pay for these trials as well as associated costs, such as transport for patients.

When Dave first got involved eight years ago, it was worth a few hundred pounds a month to him. Now it generates ten times that.

He said: “It started when the driver they were using was ill this particular day and I got the call asking if I would like to do a job.

“I said yes – it was certainly better than having to work nights with all the drunks around – and that was the start of it. I haven’t looked back.

“I take people for clinical research in Singleton or Morriston, picking them up from home and taking them back again afterwards.

“We have around 25 patients a week. It’s so busy I’ve had to take some other drivers on. They’re self-employed and do the work for me. They’re landed because it means work for them.

“My son is a self-employed driver and he helps me occasionally too. Business is really thriving.

“I work hard and I have overheads to pay but I’m far better off than I would be working for another company.”

Most of the work is in the southwest Wales region, but Dave has had to make occasional trips to England, including Gloucester and Darlington.

Clinical trials take place simultaneously in UK and overseas centres. As they involve regular meetings between the lead investigating officers from each centre, Dave often makes airport journeys too.

Professor Steve Bain (left), ABMU’s Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development, said the trials involved a significant financial commitment on the part of pharmaceutical companies.

Professor Bain said: “They don’t want people dropping out of these trials because they have difficulty getting to the hospital or have problems parking.

“So taxi companies are paid by the companies to be there on time.

“Patients are brought in, see the clinical staff, and are taken home again. It’s to make life as simple as possible for them.”

Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the medical school they actually save the NHS money.

Professor Bain said: “There are cost-saving elements for the NHS during these trials because the medicines are all given by the companies that are trying to license them.

“With diabetic patients, for example, they don’t need to go to the diabetes centres while they are in the trial, which then opens up space for other people.”

ABMU, Swansea University and Hywel Dda have embarked on the Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) project to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

As research and development is an important part of this, it creates the potential for a significant increase in clinical trials in the ABMU and Hywel Dda areas – with all the health and economic benefits that would bring.

Professor Bain said: “Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, Arch gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales.

“All these trials are closely monitored and we have people visiting on a weekly basis to keep tabs on them.

“If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy.”

Meanwhile, Dave is in absolutely no doubt about the benefits of clinical trials and not just in terms of his own business.

He said: “I talk to the patients and they think these research projects are wonderful. They feel like they are coming into a private hospital.

“Everybody will benefit if there is more research. It’s great for patients and it creates work for people like me. Everyone wins.”

17 of 36

Clinical trials provide a healthy living for Swansea taxi driver

A Swansea cabbie’s livelihood is certainly in good health thanks to clinical trials taking place in the city.

Self-employed Dave Thompson is kept so busy ferrying patients around he doesn’t just making a living out of it – he gives other drivers a helping hand by putting work their way too.

Clinical trials, or research studies, are carried out in a partnership between ABMU Health Board and Swansea University Medical School.

They involve new medicines or devices that are being licensed and are trialled on patients, who have agreed to take part, to determine whether they are safe and more effective than current treatments.

Pharmaceutical companies pay for these trials as well as associated costs, such as transport for patients.

When Dave first got involved eight years ago, it was worth a few hundred pounds a month to him. Now it generates ten times that.

He said: “It started when the driver they were using was ill this particular day and I got the call asking if I would like to do a job.

“I said yes – it was certainly better than having to work nights with all the drunks around – and that was the start of it. I haven’t looked back.

“I take people for clinical research in Singleton or Morriston, picking them up from home and taking them back again afterwards.

“We have around 25 patients a week. It’s so busy I’ve had to take some other drivers on. They’re self-employed and do the work for me. They’re landed because it means work for them.

“My son is a self-employed driver and he helps me occasionally too. Business is really thriving.

“I work hard and I have overheads to pay but I’m far better off than I would be working for another company.”

Most of the work is in the southwest Wales region, but Dave has had to make occasional trips to England, including Gloucester and Darlington.

Clinical trials take place simultaneously in UK and overseas centres. As they involve regular meetings between the lead investigating officers from each centre, Dave often makes airport journeys too.

Professor Steve Bain (left), ABMU’s Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development, said the trials involved a significant financial commitment on the part of pharmaceutical companies.

Professor Bain said: “They don’t want people dropping out of these trials because they have difficulty getting to the hospital or have problems parking.

“So taxi companies are paid by the companies to be there on time.

“Patients are brought in, see the clinical staff, and are taken home again. It’s to make life as simple as possible for them.”

Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the medical school they actually save the NHS money.

Professor Bain said: “There are cost-saving elements for the NHS during these trials because the medicines are all given by the companies that are trying to license them.

“With diabetic patients, for example, they don’t need to go to the diabetes centres while they are in the trial, which then opens up space for other people.”

ABMU, Swansea University and Hywel Dda have embarked on the Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) project to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

As research and development is an important part of this, it creates the potential for a significant increase in clinical trials in the ABMU and Hywel Dda areas – with all the health and economic benefits that would bring.

Professor Bain said: “Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, Arch gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales.

“All these trials are closely monitored and we have people visiting on a weekly basis to keep tabs on them.

“If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy.”

Meanwhile, Dave is in absolutely no doubt about the benefits of clinical trials and not just in terms of his own business.

He said: “I talk to the patients and they think these research projects are wonderful. They feel like they are coming into a private hospital.

“Everybody will benefit if there is more research. It’s great for patients and it creates work for people like me. Everyone wins.”

17 of 36

ARCH is key part of £500m Swansea Bay City Region deal

Internet Coast proposal submitted to Chancellor

THE Swansea Bay City Region has submitted a ground-breaking ‘Internet Coast’ City Deal bid, in excess of £500 million over 20 years, to both the UK and Welsh Governments.

The aim is to address the integrated universal themes and challenges of energy, health and well-being and economic acceleration by harnessing the transformational power of digital networks and the asset base of Swansea Bay. It is estimated that the City Deal investment could lever in total around £3.3bn of output and £1.3bn of gross value added for Wales, while supporting around 39,000 jobs in the region.

Chair of the Swansea Bay City Region Board Sir Terry Matthews said: “Swansea Bay became world famous in ‘the first machine age’. We aim to re-energise a vibrant and pioneering role in Wales and the UK as the world now enters ‘a new digital machine age.’

“There are echoes of the Industrial Revolution in this vision and I am pleased to be leading the region as we aim for a new place in the global economy.  I can clearly see a Swansea Bay that is globally recognised for innovation and economic acceleration once again, ideally located on ‘a digital super highway connecting the UK and North America - London and New York.

 

“Think of the way the internet and broadband networks have transformed communications worldwide. Now imagine the same principle applied to future energy systems, to health and well-being and any number of other sectors. It is a massive opportunity and with City Deal support we can take a lead position in Wales and make our wider contribution to the UK and to Europe.”

“In my letter to the Chancellor I have described the widest possible regional public sector commitment to this City Deal bid as ‘a leap of faith’ that has immense value. I sincerely hope that the bold vision and support is recognised by Government in Westminster and Cardiff Bay. I know also that there are many private sector partners, here in Swansea Bay, across Wales and the UK and around the world who are enthused by our ‘leap of logic’.

“We need to incubate, launch and grow an ecosystem of new, successful and fast growing companies here in Swansea Bay. With the clarity, direction and impetus that a City Deal can provide just watch us ‘move that needle’ to a higher level of growth.”

 As part of the City Region deal, the ARCH health programme is working to address the challenges we face in health and healthcare across the region.  ARCH chairman Professor Andrew Davies, who is also chair of ABMU Health Board and a member of the Swansea Bay City Region Board, explains how the plans will benefit the health and wellbeing of people in South West Wales.

He said: “The City Deal will accelerate the rate at which the ARCH partners can deliver an innovative and pioneering healthcare service in this region. ARCH is working on a regional footprint of one million people - with an effective digital infrastructure in place through the City Region Deal we will be able to really create a new model of pro-active, personalised and co-ordinated healthcare delivery, which will be seen as an exemplar in the NHS.

“Through health science innovation and research, ARCH will also be able to attract highly-qualified people and high growth businesses to South West Wales. With the correct technology and digital platforms in place – supported by the creation of a “digital super highway” we will be able to truly transform the way healthcare is delivered in our communities.

“These are exciting plans which will have real benefit to us all.”

 

18 of 36

ARCH is key part of £500m Swansea Bay City Region deal

Internet Coast proposal submitted to Chancellor

THE Swansea Bay City Region has submitted a ground-breaking ‘Internet Coast’ City Deal bid, in excess of £500 million over 20 years, to both the UK and Welsh Governments.

The aim is to address the integrated universal themes and challenges of energy, health and well-being and economic acceleration by harnessing the transformational power of digital networks and the asset base of Swansea Bay. It is estimated that the City Deal investment could lever in total around £3.3bn of output and £1.3bn of gross value added for Wales, while supporting around 39,000 jobs in the region.

Chair of the Swansea Bay City Region Board Sir Terry Matthews said: “Swansea Bay became world famous in ‘the first machine age’. We aim to re-energise a vibrant and pioneering role in Wales and the UK as the world now enters ‘a new digital machine age.’

“There are echoes of the Industrial Revolution in this vision and I am pleased to be leading the region as we aim for a new place in the global economy.  I can clearly see a Swansea Bay that is globally recognised for innovation and economic acceleration once again, ideally located on ‘a digital super highway connecting the UK and North America - London and New York.

 

“Think of the way the internet and broadband networks have transformed communications worldwide. Now imagine the same principle applied to future energy systems, to health and well-being and any number of other sectors. It is a massive opportunity and with City Deal support we can take a lead position in Wales and make our wider contribution to the UK and to Europe.”

“In my letter to the Chancellor I have described the widest possible regional public sector commitment to this City Deal bid as ‘a leap of faith’ that has immense value. I sincerely hope that the bold vision and support is recognised by Government in Westminster and Cardiff Bay. I know also that there are many private sector partners, here in Swansea Bay, across Wales and the UK and around the world who are enthused by our ‘leap of logic’.

“We need to incubate, launch and grow an ecosystem of new, successful and fast growing companies here in Swansea Bay. With the clarity, direction and impetus that a City Deal can provide just watch us ‘move that needle’ to a higher level of growth.”

 As part of the City Region deal, the ARCH health programme is working to address the challenges we face in health and healthcare across the region.  ARCH chairman Professor Andrew Davies, who is also chair of ABMU Health Board and a member of the Swansea Bay City Region Board, explains how the plans will benefit the health and wellbeing of people in South West Wales.

He said: “The City Deal will accelerate the rate at which the ARCH partners can deliver an innovative and pioneering healthcare service in this region. ARCH is working on a regional footprint of one million people - with an effective digital infrastructure in place through the City Region Deal we will be able to really create a new model of pro-active, personalised and co-ordinated healthcare delivery, which will be seen as an exemplar in the NHS.

“Through health science innovation and research, ARCH will also be able to attract highly-qualified people and high growth businesses to South West Wales. With the correct technology and digital platforms in place – supported by the creation of a “digital super highway” we will be able to truly transform the way healthcare is delivered in our communities.

“These are exciting plans which will have real benefit to us all.”

 

18 of 36

Unlocking innovation 'key' to NHS research success

Doctors need to be given freedom to do research alongside clinical work to aid medical advances, according to a pioneering scientist

Dr Kunnathur Rajan led tests in the 1970s into the effects of asbestos on the lungs and smoking-related cancers, reports the BBC.

Swansea University's Medical School Dean Prof Keith Lloyd said the key is to "unlock the innovation" in the NHS.

The Welsh Government has said a "significant minority" of doctors do research and it hopes numbers increase.

Despite time and financial pressures, Dr Rajan said allowing consultants to conduct studies would save the NHS money in the long-run because of any subsequent breakthroughs.

He said: "Doctors can be trained in medicine but that doesn't mean they can do research. It took me seven years [to learn]."

Indian-born Dr Rajan studied at the Christian Medical College, Vellore, and worked at hospitals around England before deciding to broaden his research by doing a PhD at Cambridge University.

While there, he worked with Dame Honor Fell, who is credited with developing the organ culture method, growing living cells in the laboratory so they can be studied.

In 1970, Dr Rajan joined the pneumoconiosis research unit at Cardiff's Llandough Hospital, where he led research looking into the effects of asbestos on the lungs.

To illustrate this, he developed the organ culture method for adult pleura (lining of the lung) and grew a tumour.

The work was seen as a breakthrough and the results published in the Nature journal in 1972.

Other research at the unit included looking at the effects of smoking on human lungs and maintaining pancreas and human brain tissue using the organ culture method.

When this work ended, Dr Rajan took a position as a consultant physician in rheumatology in Rhondda Cynon Taff.

After a visit to the USA for a conference, he was convinced diagnostic equipment to check bone density could help rising cases of people suffering from osteoporosis.

With no funding available in the NHS, he approached local mayor Edie May Evans, who helped raise £60,000. The service is running at Pontypridd's Dewi Sant Hospital.

"I scanned 16,000 patients on the NHS with it and published nearly 100 papers - I found that if you can catch the signs of osteoporosis early and treat it, you can save a lot of money.

"Early intervention can prevent fracture - which also means the quality of life for the patient is better because if they break their hip and have a replacement, it is not the same as having their own."

Dr Rajan described himself as "an eternal student" and said all consultants should carry out research alongside clinical work.

A "significant minority" is currently involved, according to Dr Jon Bisson, director of the Welsh Government's Health and Care Research Wales.

While he believes skills and job pressures make it "unrealistic" that all could carry out regular research, he wants to ensure everyone has a chance.

"We should be playing to individual strengths - some are more interested in research, some have backgrounds that make it more likely for them," he said.

"As we move forward, some will be the key investigators."

Currently, some doctors have a half day a week for research in their contract, while others are able to discuss ring-fencing time with their managers or apply for funding.

Dr Bisson added: "I want to see pockets of excellence that exist grow throughout Wales."

One of these is emerging through a link-up between Swansea University Medical School and the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg (ABMU) and Hywel Dda health boards.

Under the banner of A Regional Collaboration for Health (ARCH), it aims to develop more opportunities for healthcare research work. This will not be the route for all consultants though, said Prof Keith Lloyd, dean of the medical school.

While he said an "understanding of how to appraise evidence and understand research" is a core skill for all doctors, not all will be involved on an ongoing basis.

Some will instead focus on things like teaching and management alongside their clinical work.

However, he believes ARCH has the potential to "unlock the innovation" in the NHS.

“There are many things a consultant can do in addition to clinical work, specifically research, learning and teaching, innovation and management. Each is equally important.  

“An understanding of how to appraise evidence and understand research is a core skill for all doctors. But not all doctors need to do research on an ongoing basis.

“In terms of conflicts of interest, there is always the need to be transparent, and that is what ethics committees and research governance are in place for.

“Research is funded through a number of routes, such as Health and Care Research Wales, which is part of Welsh Government and each health board has a budget for R&D. Many other bodies fund health and life sciences research for example the research councils  and charities such as the Wellcome, Cancer Research UK and the British Heart foundation for example.

“The ARCH partners are incredibly lucky to have ABMU and Hywel Dda R&D directors of the highest calibre - in Professor Steve Bain and Dr Keir Lewis.

“The ARCH Programme is investing in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. As part of ARCH, the Medical School, through its research and innovation arm at the Institute of Life Science (ILS) is currently developing a strategy for Intellectual Property (IP) harmonisation and commercialisation.

“This strategy will help unlock the innovation within the NHS and also give NHS staff a framework to help bring their innovation to life and support them to deliver that innovation to deliver real benefits to patients.” added: “ARCH is working with Welsh Government to further strengthen the support available to our clinicians and other health professionals to undertake research and innovation work.

“This includes a number of exciting initiatives which build upon work at Swansea University Medical School’s ILS, with the aim of taking concepts through to clinical and commercial impact. This will deliver a significant expansion in technical development, clinical research and commercialisation capability allowing colleagues across the NHS to engage in research and innovation alongside patient care.

“We look forward to launching these plans soon, which will deliver benefit to patients and enterprise across South West Wales and beyond.”

 Professor Steve Bain, Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development for ABMU, said: “Consultants have the choice to use one of their allocated Supporting Professional Activities (SPA) sessions on research.

“Research and development (R&D) within the health boards have funding to support and build capacity through backfill sessions and the employment of research nurses to support consultants. There is also a dedicated R&D budget which is based on the amount of health board research portfolio activity and there is also re-investment from involvement in commercially sponsored clinical research which enables  our consultants to build the resources available to them.

“The Health Boards have partner Clinical Trials Unit which support design methodology and the development of research which also provides dedicated support through trials managers who help support consultants’ workload.

“Welsh Government also run an annual Clinical Fellowship which is made available for consultants to bid to undertake protected time for their research work.”

19 of 36

Unlocking innovation 'key' to NHS research success

Doctors need to be given freedom to do research alongside clinical work to aid medical advances, according to a pioneering scientist

Dr Kunnathur Rajan led tests in the 1970s into the effects of asbestos on the lungs and smoking-related cancers, reports the BBC.

Swansea University's Medical School Dean Prof Keith Lloyd said the key is to "unlock the innovation" in the NHS.

The Welsh Government has said a "significant minority" of doctors do research and it hopes numbers increase.

Despite time and financial pressures, Dr Rajan said allowing consultants to conduct studies would save the NHS money in the long-run because of any subsequent breakthroughs.

He said: "Doctors can be trained in medicine but that doesn't mean they can do research. It took me seven years [to learn]."

Indian-born Dr Rajan studied at the Christian Medical College, Vellore, and worked at hospitals around England before deciding to broaden his research by doing a PhD at Cambridge University.

While there, he worked with Dame Honor Fell, who is credited with developing the organ culture method, growing living cells in the laboratory so they can be studied.

In 1970, Dr Rajan joined the pneumoconiosis research unit at Cardiff's Llandough Hospital, where he led research looking into the effects of asbestos on the lungs.

To illustrate this, he developed the organ culture method for adult pleura (lining of the lung) and grew a tumour.

The work was seen as a breakthrough and the results published in the Nature journal in 1972.

Other research at the unit included looking at the effects of smoking on human lungs and maintaining pancreas and human brain tissue using the organ culture method.

When this work ended, Dr Rajan took a position as a consultant physician in rheumatology in Rhondda Cynon Taff.

After a visit to the USA for a conference, he was convinced diagnostic equipment to check bone density could help rising cases of people suffering from osteoporosis.

With no funding available in the NHS, he approached local mayor Edie May Evans, who helped raise £60,000. The service is running at Pontypridd's Dewi Sant Hospital.

"I scanned 16,000 patients on the NHS with it and published nearly 100 papers - I found that if you can catch the signs of osteoporosis early and treat it, you can save a lot of money.

"Early intervention can prevent fracture - which also means the quality of life for the patient is better because if they break their hip and have a replacement, it is not the same as having their own."

Dr Rajan described himself as "an eternal student" and said all consultants should carry out research alongside clinical work.

A "significant minority" is currently involved, according to Dr Jon Bisson, director of the Welsh Government's Health and Care Research Wales.

While he believes skills and job pressures make it "unrealistic" that all could carry out regular research, he wants to ensure everyone has a chance.

"We should be playing to individual strengths - some are more interested in research, some have backgrounds that make it more likely for them," he said.

"As we move forward, some will be the key investigators."

Currently, some doctors have a half day a week for research in their contract, while others are able to discuss ring-fencing time with their managers or apply for funding.

Dr Bisson added: "I want to see pockets of excellence that exist grow throughout Wales."

One of these is emerging through a link-up between Swansea University Medical School and the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg (ABMU) and Hywel Dda health boards.

Under the banner of A Regional Collaboration for Health (ARCH), it aims to develop more opportunities for healthcare research work. This will not be the route for all consultants though, said Prof Keith Lloyd, dean of the medical school.

While he said an "understanding of how to appraise evidence and understand research" is a core skill for all doctors, not all will be involved on an ongoing basis.

Some will instead focus on things like teaching and management alongside their clinical work.

However, he believes ARCH has the potential to "unlock the innovation" in the NHS.

“There are many things a consultant can do in addition to clinical work, specifically research, learning and teaching, innovation and management. Each is equally important.  

“An understanding of how to appraise evidence and understand research is a core skill for all doctors. But not all doctors need to do research on an ongoing basis.

“In terms of conflicts of interest, there is always the need to be transparent, and that is what ethics committees and research governance are in place for.

“Research is funded through a number of routes, such as Health and Care Research Wales, which is part of Welsh Government and each health board has a budget for R&D. Many other bodies fund health and life sciences research for example the research councils  and charities such as the Wellcome, Cancer Research UK and the British Heart foundation for example.

“The ARCH partners are incredibly lucky to have ABMU and Hywel Dda R&D directors of the highest calibre - in Professor Steve Bain and Dr Keir Lewis.

“The ARCH Programme is investing in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. As part of ARCH, the Medical School, through its research and innovation arm at the Institute of Life Science (ILS) is currently developing a strategy for Intellectual Property (IP) harmonisation and commercialisation.

“This strategy will help unlock the innovation within the NHS and also give NHS staff a framework to help bring their innovation to life and support them to deliver that innovation to deliver real benefits to patients.” added: “ARCH is working with Welsh Government to further strengthen the support available to our clinicians and other health professionals to undertake research and innovation work.

“This includes a number of exciting initiatives which build upon work at Swansea University Medical School’s ILS, with the aim of taking concepts through to clinical and commercial impact. This will deliver a significant expansion in technical development, clinical research and commercialisation capability allowing colleagues across the NHS to engage in research and innovation alongside patient care.

“We look forward to launching these plans soon, which will deliver benefit to patients and enterprise across South West Wales and beyond.”

 Professor Steve Bain, Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development for ABMU, said: “Consultants have the choice to use one of their allocated Supporting Professional Activities (SPA) sessions on research.

“Research and development (R&D) within the health boards have funding to support and build capacity through backfill sessions and the employment of research nurses to support consultants. There is also a dedicated R&D budget which is based on the amount of health board research portfolio activity and there is also re-investment from involvement in commercially sponsored clinical research which enables  our consultants to build the resources available to them.

“The Health Boards have partner Clinical Trials Unit which support design methodology and the development of research which also provides dedicated support through trials managers who help support consultants’ workload.

“Welsh Government also run an annual Clinical Fellowship which is made available for consultants to bid to undertake protected time for their research work.”

19 of 36

'ARCH is starting a healthcare revolution in Wales'

ARCH chair Andrew Davies explains the ARCH ambition

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health), is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards.

The ARCH partners are working to bring health and science together to transform the NHS, train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers and scientist and also boost the local economy by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

With the NHS under increased pressure to achieve more with less money, the ARCH collaboration is creating a new image of healthcare provision in South West Wales.

ARCH Chairman Prof Andrew Davies explains the ARCH ambitions:

"ARCH is a truly unique proposition. Nothing of this scale or complexity has been attempted in Wales before. 

Given the size of the ARCH ambition, the progress we are already making is testament to the relationships built up between the three partners. And the significant backing from Welsh Government demonstrates their confidence, and belief, in the ARCH ethos and its work.

A Regional Collaboration for Health is bringing together health and science to transform the NHS as we know it in this region. The challenges facing the NHS across the UK are well documented and discussed, we are all under increased pressure to achieve more with less.

ARCH is starting a revolution in healthcare in Wales, and we believe it is a revolution which is replicable across the whole of the NHS.

ARCH has come about as a result of ABMU, Hywel Dda and Swansea University getting our heads together, and reimagining how healthcare needs to work for the people within the communities we serve. Rather than attempting to continue to work in an unworkable way to patch up healthcare provision, ARCH is striving to do it all differently.

ARCH is a bridge between health and wellbeing. It will link services, invest in facilities, develop new strategies and support the people in our region. Building on our existing relationships, the ARCH partnership allows us  to work with a regional focus. The ARCH region covers a population of 1 million people and covers 6 local authority areas – the potential to shape health, healthcare and our economy is huge.

We are also working to train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders as well also help drive the local economy by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs. ARCH will also invest in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. We will also unlock the innovation which exists the NHS to help deliver real patient benefits.

We want to create world-class medical facilities, greatly improve and expand existing health and wellbeing facilities, develop and improve social approaches which can prevent health problems from developing, and enable those who are living with issues to better manage, and thus enjoy improved outcomes.

ARCH focuses on the wellbeing of the communities it serves – with health being just a single factor of that focus.

Ultimately, our ambition is to improve the lives of the people of South West Wales, because with improved health comes greater overall wellbeing, which has a positive influence on economic factors, which in turn serves to improve the entire area in a sustainable way for the future.

Investment in services and research will also bring jobs and money to this corner of Wales sooner rather than later. This again has a positive knock on effect for the entire area in terms of providing opportunity."

20 of 36

'ARCH is starting a healthcare revolution in Wales'

ARCH chair Andrew Davies explains the ARCH ambition

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health), is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards.

The ARCH partners are working to bring health and science together to transform the NHS, train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers and scientist and also boost the local economy by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

With the NHS under increased pressure to achieve more with less money, the ARCH collaboration is creating a new image of healthcare provision in South West Wales.

ARCH Chairman Prof Andrew Davies explains the ARCH ambitions:

"ARCH is a truly unique proposition. Nothing of this scale or complexity has been attempted in Wales before. 

Given the size of the ARCH ambition, the progress we are already making is testament to the relationships built up between the three partners. And the significant backing from Welsh Government demonstrates their confidence, and belief, in the ARCH ethos and its work.

A Regional Collaboration for Health is bringing together health and science to transform the NHS as we know it in this region. The challenges facing the NHS across the UK are well documented and discussed, we are all under increased pressure to achieve more with less.

ARCH is starting a revolution in healthcare in Wales, and we believe it is a revolution which is replicable across the whole of the NHS.

ARCH has come about as a result of ABMU, Hywel Dda and Swansea University getting our heads together, and reimagining how healthcare needs to work for the people within the communities we serve. Rather than attempting to continue to work in an unworkable way to patch up healthcare provision, ARCH is striving to do it all differently.

ARCH is a bridge between health and wellbeing. It will link services, invest in facilities, develop new strategies and support the people in our region. Building on our existing relationships, the ARCH partnership allows us  to work with a regional focus. The ARCH region covers a population of 1 million people and covers 6 local authority areas – the potential to shape health, healthcare and our economy is huge.

We are also working to train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders as well also help drive the local economy by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs. ARCH will also invest in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. We will also unlock the innovation which exists the NHS to help deliver real patient benefits.

We want to create world-class medical facilities, greatly improve and expand existing health and wellbeing facilities, develop and improve social approaches which can prevent health problems from developing, and enable those who are living with issues to better manage, and thus enjoy improved outcomes.

ARCH focuses on the wellbeing of the communities it serves – with health being just a single factor of that focus.

Ultimately, our ambition is to improve the lives of the people of South West Wales, because with improved health comes greater overall wellbeing, which has a positive influence on economic factors, which in turn serves to improve the entire area in a sustainable way for the future.

Investment in services and research will also bring jobs and money to this corner of Wales sooner rather than later. This again has a positive knock on effect for the entire area in terms of providing opportunity."

20 of 36

Swansea University Medical School Dean Keith Lloyd's Health Column

The Medical School is proud to have a close, productive and effective relationship with our health boards.

The Medical School is proud to have a close, productive and effective relationship with our health boards.

As a school we are educating and training tomorrow’s doctors and life scientists but also helping to deliver real healthcare improvements for patients today through research and collaboration.

This collaborative approach is being maximised by the ARCH Partnership. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique programme made up of Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and aims to bring health and science together to transform the NHS in this region, train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders and also help the local economy to thrive by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

The challenges facing the NHS across the UK are well documented and discussed in the media. The NHS is under increased pressure to achieve more with less money.

The ARCH partners are working together create a new image of healthcare provision in this area. ARCH truly is revolutionary in terms of its approach to creating a synergy between health and holistic wellbeing and economic regeneration.

The university and health boards have chosen to collaborate, and create an innovative and fresh way forward for the provision of healthcare and health and wellbeing services for the population of South West Wales.

As a school, through ARCH, we will build on our existing relationships with ABMU and developing our work with Hywel Dda University health Board. This partnership allows the Medical School to work with a regional focus. The ARCH Programme covers a population of 1 million people and involves 6 local authority areas – nothing of this scale or complexity has been attempted in Wales before.

ARCH will also invest in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. As part of ARCH, the Medical School is developing a strategy for Intellectual property (IP) harmonisation and commercialisation. What does this mean to the NHS and the people it cares for? This strategy will help unlock the innovation within the NHS and also give our NHS staff a framework to help bring their innovation to life and support them to deliver that innovation to deliver real benefits to patients.

The Medical School is holding a free information day on April 23 from 10am to 12pm on our Postgraduate part-time courses. This is a great opportunity for NHS staff to find out more about how they can develop their skills base and learning.

I would encourage our NHS workforce in South West Wales  to come along and find out about part time study opportunities which could really enhance their own development and the care they deliver to our patients.

21 of 36

Swansea University Medical School Dean Keith Lloyd's Health Column

The Medical School is proud to have a close, productive and effective relationship with our health boards.

The Medical School is proud to have a close, productive and effective relationship with our health boards.

As a school we are educating and training tomorrow’s doctors and life scientists but also helping to deliver real healthcare improvements for patients today through research and collaboration.

This collaborative approach is being maximised by the ARCH Partnership. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique programme made up of Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and aims to bring health and science together to transform the NHS in this region, train and develop the next generation of doctors, nurses, health workers, scientists, innovators and leaders and also help the local economy to thrive by encouraging investment opportunities and creating new jobs.

The challenges facing the NHS across the UK are well documented and discussed in the media. The NHS is under increased pressure to achieve more with less money.

The ARCH partners are working together create a new image of healthcare provision in this area. ARCH truly is revolutionary in terms of its approach to creating a synergy between health and holistic wellbeing and economic regeneration.

The university and health boards have chosen to collaborate, and create an innovative and fresh way forward for the provision of healthcare and health and wellbeing services for the population of South West Wales.

As a school, through ARCH, we will build on our existing relationships with ABMU and developing our work with Hywel Dda University health Board. This partnership allows the Medical School to work with a regional focus. The ARCH Programme covers a population of 1 million people and involves 6 local authority areas – nothing of this scale or complexity has been attempted in Wales before.

ARCH will also invest in healthcare research and innovation and the translation and implementation of that work. As part of ARCH, the Medical School is developing a strategy for Intellectual property (IP) harmonisation and commercialisation. What does this mean to the NHS and the people it cares for? This strategy will help unlock the innovation within the NHS and also give our NHS staff a framework to help bring their innovation to life and support them to deliver that innovation to deliver real benefits to patients.

The Medical School is holding a free information day on April 23 from 10am to 12pm on our Postgraduate part-time courses. This is a great opportunity for NHS staff to find out more about how they can develop their skills base and learning.

I would encourage our NHS workforce in South West Wales  to come along and find out about part time study opportunities which could really enhance their own development and the care they deliver to our patients.

21 of 36

Collaborate 2016

Collaborate 2016 is back and building on the success of last year’s event

Collaborate 2016 is back and building on the success of last year’s event. The life science-focused day will be once again dedicated to celebrating and promoting collaborative projects and partnerships across industry, academia, Government, health boards and other organisations.

Bringing together more than 300 representatives from across the region and beyond, the event will be hosted by the Swansea University Medical School’s Enterprise and Innovation Team, AHSC, ABMU and Hywel Dda University Health Boards as part of the ARCH Partnership.

Collaborate 2016 takes place on October 19, 8:15am - 4:45pm at Swansea University's Singleton Campus.

Alongside the event’s high profile speakers, there will also be a series of thematic workshops, tours of ILS facilities and opportunity for attendees to network for further collaboration.

 

22 of 36

Collaborate 2016

Collaborate 2016 is back and building on the success of last year’s event

Collaborate 2016 is back and building on the success of last year’s event. The life science-focused day will be once again dedicated to celebrating and promoting collaborative projects and partnerships across industry, academia, Government, health boards and other organisations.

Bringing together more than 300 representatives from across the region and beyond, the event will be hosted by the Swansea University Medical School’s Enterprise and Innovation Team, AHSC, ABMU and Hywel Dda University Health Boards as part of the ARCH Partnership.

Collaborate 2016 takes place on October 19, 8:15am - 4:45pm at Swansea University's Singleton Campus.

Alongside the event’s high profile speakers, there will also be a series of thematic workshops, tours of ILS facilities and opportunity for attendees to network for further collaboration.

 

22 of 36

Have Swansea University academics got the solution to bad moods and feeling stressed?

Brain scientists and psychologists at Swansea University are developing a new technique which can reduce the impact of stress on mood and help improve your emotional wellbeing

Everyone experiences emotional ups and downs. Life today is fraught with many stressful situations which can lead to irritability, stress, agitation and moodiness.

But brain scientists and psychologists at Swansea University are developing a new technique which can reduce the impact of stress on mood and help improve your emotional wellbeing.

Dr Frederic Boy, who works at both the College of Human and Health Science and the School of Management at the university, is leading the research. And his work is already receiving international interest in the short period since his paper was published in scientific journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Dr Boy, who is originally from Provence and has lived in Swansea for the past four years, said: “When facing stressful events, the frontal regions of the brain are particularly active and constantly appraise the positive or negative emotions which are generated, and that will, in turn, shape how we react to situations.

“Over time, the negative impact of stressors build up and the physical and emotional wellbeing may be compromised. We asked ourselves - can the impact of stress on the brain of a non-depressed individual be reduced?”

Dr Boy, along with fellow academic Sian Roderick, also from Swansea, have developed new brain science research employing weak electrical impulses to stimulate the frontal cortex by placing  electrodes on the top of the head.

And if this sounds like a intimidating process, Sian says the technique is actually very simple and the stimulation is very subtle. She said: “We don’t want anyone to think this is like electrical treatments used in the past. The volunteers were all very relaxed with the process and the stimulation lasts for a very short period and feels like a much weaker version of a TENS machine, for example.”

Dr Boy added: “Advances in transcranial electrical stimulation techniques mean we are able to investigate different clinical and non-clinical people and specific areas of the human brain and see how those regions regulate people’s behaviour.

“What was clear is that the way people behave results from a complex interaction between a number of genetic, social and environmental factors.”

The scientists studied 66 healthy young women, with no history of psychiatric disorders or substance dependence. The volunteers filled in questionnaires, which helped assess different aspects of their current mood, the building bricks of the emotional and physical wellbeing. They underwent a course of 12 min-a-day brain electrical stimulations sessions for five days. A total of 22 individuals received an ineffective, but realistic, placebo stimulation, while the 44 others were administered a real, active stimulation.

Dr Boy explains: “This technique employs electrical power that is more than a thousand times lower than the one used by an energy saving light bulb, and result in a feeble tingling lasting a few seconds in the first instants of the stimulation session.”

Over the duration of the research, the team found that those volunteers who received the active stimulation gradually reported having experienced less negative mood states in the past day. On the contrary, participants in the placebo group did not report notable changes in mood.

“This type of treatment has been accredited by the NHS to be used to treat depression last August. We have shown that weak electric stimulation is also effective to improve the mood of  those who are not depressed, but are still affected by the consequence of a stressful, restless and demanding lifestyle,” added Dr Boy, who is Head of Translational and Consumer Neuroscience in the Department of Psychology.

“This technique is based on robust scientific research and we hope it will be developed to create an over-the-counter device which can be used to improve mood and lower stress.”

With the recent statistics showing that more and more young people, are turning to medicating their emotional wellbeing - the number of young people in the UK prescribed anti-depressants increased by more than 50% between 2005 and 2012, according to the new study – could Dr Boy’s research lead to a reduction in this worrying trend?

“Yes, we are hopeful this research can assist in the treatment of low mood without having to resort to medication.

“As well as the possible side effects this type of treatment can have on the patient, prescribing drugs in the first instance is a huge drain on the NHS. We are aiming to align our work with the Prudent Healthcare agenda set out by the Health Minister.

“As a university we are excited to be part of ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health).

“The ARCH partners are working to use innovation and research to drive health service improvements and we believe this research could be a part of this transformational approach.

“We hope that in developing a device which people can choose to use we are also empowering the population to take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing.”

Dr Boy and Sian Roderick are both directors of the emerging life science firm Neurotheraputics, and are hopeful their research can be developed by West Wales medical devices firm Magstim.

The Whitland-based company, who pioneer and manufacture non-invasive magnetic stimulation devices, say they are excited by the research.

Charles Hounsell, Magstim product specialist, said: “Magstim is delighted to explore opportunities with Swansea University to expand our understanding of therapeutic techniques using neurostimulation devices.

“The field of non-invasive brain stimulation is expanding rapidly and we are hugely excited about the potential benefits of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). We look forward to discussing this research further with Dr Boy and his team.”

And Magstim are not the only people who have taken a keen interest in the research. Dr Boy’s paper has been viewed across the globe with several hits on his online paper coming from the Whitehouse.

The interest into this work has been overwhelming,” said Dr Boy. “We have had views from Silicon Valley, New York and Washington.

“It makes sense though - I am sure life at the Whitehouse gets very stressful,” jokes Dr Boy.

But not to make light of the possible impact this research could have on improving people’s lives, Dr Boy adds: “This is of global significance. This could absolutely change people’s lives.

We are starting further research on whether this form of brain stimulation could also provide relief in ailments such as low back pain or migraine.”

Professor Ceri Phillips, Head of the College of Human and Health Science and ARCH board member, said Dr Boy’s work was a great example of innovation and research being translated to benefit people in South West Wales.

He said: “ARCH is Swansea University working with our two health boards of ABMU and Hywel Dda to innovate new ways of working to improve the healthcare we deliver in this region.

“This type of research could create a complementary therapy which may contribute to relieving the pressures on our GPs, reduce the cost of prescribing drugs and help to support the one million people in the ARCH region in taking responsibility for their own health, wellness and wellbeing.

“The new Health and Wellbeing Academy which will open on the Singleton Health Campus in September has the same aims. We want to provide treatments which will improve wellness and also help to alleviate the pressure on our primary care services.

“We look forward to developing Dr Boy’s work.”

 

To read Dr Boy’s paper visit: www.journal.frontiersin.org

23 of 36

Have Swansea University academics got the solution to bad moods and feeling stressed?

Brain scientists and psychologists at Swansea University are developing a new technique which can reduce the impact of stress on mood and help improve your emotional wellbeing

Everyone experiences emotional ups and downs. Life today is fraught with many stressful situations which can lead to irritability, stress, agitation and moodiness.

But brain scientists and psychologists at Swansea University are developing a new technique which can reduce the impact of stress on mood and help improve your emotional wellbeing.

Dr Frederic Boy, who works at both the College of Human and Health Science and the School of Management at the university, is leading the research. And his work is already receiving international interest in the short period since his paper was published in scientific journal Frontiers in Psychology.

Dr Boy, who is originally from Provence and has lived in Swansea for the past four years, said: “When facing stressful events, the frontal regions of the brain are particularly active and constantly appraise the positive or negative emotions which are generated, and that will, in turn, shape how we react to situations.

“Over time, the negative impact of stressors build up and the physical and emotional wellbeing may be compromised. We asked ourselves - can the impact of stress on the brain of a non-depressed individual be reduced?”

Dr Boy, along with fellow academic Sian Roderick, also from Swansea, have developed new brain science research employing weak electrical impulses to stimulate the frontal cortex by placing  electrodes on the top of the head.

And if this sounds like a intimidating process, Sian says the technique is actually very simple and the stimulation is very subtle. She said: “We don’t want anyone to think this is like electrical treatments used in the past. The volunteers were all very relaxed with the process and the stimulation lasts for a very short period and feels like a much weaker version of a TENS machine, for example.”

Dr Boy added: “Advances in transcranial electrical stimulation techniques mean we are able to investigate different clinical and non-clinical people and specific areas of the human brain and see how those regions regulate people’s behaviour.

“What was clear is that the way people behave results from a complex interaction between a number of genetic, social and environmental factors.”

The scientists studied 66 healthy young women, with no history of psychiatric disorders or substance dependence. The volunteers filled in questionnaires, which helped assess different aspects of their current mood, the building bricks of the emotional and physical wellbeing. They underwent a course of 12 min-a-day brain electrical stimulations sessions for five days. A total of 22 individuals received an ineffective, but realistic, placebo stimulation, while the 44 others were administered a real, active stimulation.

Dr Boy explains: “This technique employs electrical power that is more than a thousand times lower than the one used by an energy saving light bulb, and result in a feeble tingling lasting a few seconds in the first instants of the stimulation session.”

Over the duration of the research, the team found that those volunteers who received the active stimulation gradually reported having experienced less negative mood states in the past day. On the contrary, participants in the placebo group did not report notable changes in mood.

“This type of treatment has been accredited by the NHS to be used to treat depression last August. We have shown that weak electric stimulation is also effective to improve the mood of  those who are not depressed, but are still affected by the consequence of a stressful, restless and demanding lifestyle,” added Dr Boy, who is Head of Translational and Consumer Neuroscience in the Department of Psychology.

“This technique is based on robust scientific research and we hope it will be developed to create an over-the-counter device which can be used to improve mood and lower stress.”

With the recent statistics showing that more and more young people, are turning to medicating their emotional wellbeing - the number of young people in the UK prescribed anti-depressants increased by more than 50% between 2005 and 2012, according to the new study – could Dr Boy’s research lead to a reduction in this worrying trend?

“Yes, we are hopeful this research can assist in the treatment of low mood without having to resort to medication.

“As well as the possible side effects this type of treatment can have on the patient, prescribing drugs in the first instance is a huge drain on the NHS. We are aiming to align our work with the Prudent Healthcare agenda set out by the Health Minister.

“As a university we are excited to be part of ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health).

“The ARCH partners are working to use innovation and research to drive health service improvements and we believe this research could be a part of this transformational approach.

“We hope that in developing a device which people can choose to use we are also empowering the population to take responsibility for their own health and wellbeing.”

Dr Boy and Sian Roderick are both directors of the emerging life science firm Neurotheraputics, and are hopeful their research can be developed by West Wales medical devices firm Magstim.

The Whitland-based company, who pioneer and manufacture non-invasive magnetic stimulation devices, say they are excited by the research.

Charles Hounsell, Magstim product specialist, said: “Magstim is delighted to explore opportunities with Swansea University to expand our understanding of therapeutic techniques using neurostimulation devices.

“The field of non-invasive brain stimulation is expanding rapidly and we are hugely excited about the potential benefits of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). We look forward to discussing this research further with Dr Boy and his team.”

And Magstim are not the only people who have taken a keen interest in the research. Dr Boy’s paper has been viewed across the globe with several hits on his online paper coming from the Whitehouse.

The interest into this work has been overwhelming,” said Dr Boy. “We have had views from Silicon Valley, New York and Washington.

“It makes sense though - I am sure life at the Whitehouse gets very stressful,” jokes Dr Boy.

But not to make light of the possible impact this research could have on improving people’s lives, Dr Boy adds: “This is of global significance. This could absolutely change people’s lives.

We are starting further research on whether this form of brain stimulation could also provide relief in ailments such as low back pain or migraine.”

Professor Ceri Phillips, Head of the College of Human and Health Science and ARCH board member, said Dr Boy’s work was a great example of innovation and research being translated to benefit people in South West Wales.

He said: “ARCH is Swansea University working with our two health boards of ABMU and Hywel Dda to innovate new ways of working to improve the healthcare we deliver in this region.

“This type of research could create a complementary therapy which may contribute to relieving the pressures on our GPs, reduce the cost of prescribing drugs and help to support the one million people in the ARCH region in taking responsibility for their own health, wellness and wellbeing.

“The new Health and Wellbeing Academy which will open on the Singleton Health Campus in September has the same aims. We want to provide treatments which will improve wellness and also help to alleviate the pressure on our primary care services.

“We look forward to developing Dr Boy’s work.”

 

To read Dr Boy’s paper visit: www.journal.frontiersin.org

23 of 36

Surgeon’s pioneering infection research is honoured with “highest accolade”

Ernest Azzopardi, a Swansea surgeon has been awarded one of his profession’s highest accolades for his research

A SWANSEA surgeon who has been awarded one of his profession’s highest accolades for his research has praised the innovation and collaboration currently taking place in South West Wales.

Ernest Azzopardi, who divides his time between ABMU’s Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery and Swansea University’s Medical School, is pioneering research into burn and surgical infection.

Dr Azzopardi has received the coveted Hunterian Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in England. The award is given to a body of work which will lead to substantial clinical change in the way patients are treated.

And Dr Azzopardi says the region’s unique approach to combining health and science through the ARCH Programme is helping to not only foster a real spirit of innovation in the NHS but will also lead to breakthroughs in the way patients are treated.

Dr Azzopardi said: “ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique project. I am honoured to be part of such a transformative approach to solving healthcare challenges.

“By working so closely with the University, the two ARCH health boards are uniquely placed to make major breakthroughs in how we improve the care given to our patients.

“Infection is a major challenge for the NHS. I do believe that through this collaboration between health and science - it is a challenge we will win.”

Dr Azzopardi, who delivered the Hunterian Oration at the winter meeting of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), added: “Swansea is leading international research which can, and will, change lives.

“I am delighted to have received the Hunterian Medal – it is an international award which is open to all clinicians, not just surgeons, so I was very proud to receive it.

“I am fortunate in receiving so much support from both Swansea University Medical School and its research arm, the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and within the Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery at Morriston.

“I am also inspired by the dedication of colleagues at the Burns Centre, which receives major burns from all over the UK.”

Dr Azzopardi’s cross-theme research, which focuses on precision medicine, microbiology, nanobiotechnology and clinical surgery, has been recognised by several other awards.

He is the only Hunterian Award recipient to have also been awarded the BAPRAS President’s Medal and, for earlier works, the James Syme Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh and the T Jackson Prize from the UK British Burns Association.

Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. While some advances in precision medicine have been made, the ARCH partners of Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards are working hard to ensure it is part of the healthcare of the future.

Dr Azzopardi added: “I am honoured to be part of the ARCH collaboration which has helped make my research work possible.

“ARCH is a complex project but by bringing research excellence into the NHS arena we will be able to deliver healthcare which is faster, better and cheaper.”

 

ABMU Executive Medical Director and ARCH board member Hamish Laing has praised Dr Azzopardi’s pioneering research and explains what precision medicine will mean to patients. He said: In the past there has been an intuitive approach towards diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine brings together research, new tools and techniques to allow for a faster and more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan, personalised for the patient.

"The main aim of this approach is to provide the right drug at the right dose to the right patient at the right time.

“Infection is a major concern in surgery and especially following severe burns. I am delighted that Dr Azzopardi is leading the way in infection research and its translation into real patient benefit. This award is thoroughly deserved.

“His research work really could be a global breakthrough for infection control.”

Dr Azzopardi’s research has been supported by the Welsh Government’s Welsh Clinical Academic Track (WCAT) initiative, which integrates clinical training with academic progression and he is the first WCAT fellow in plastic surgery.

He began his post-doctoral research at Swansea University in 2013 within the reconstructive surgery and regenerative medicine group led by Professor Iain Whitaker and was later appointed honorary senior clinical lecturer.

Professor Whitaker said the Hunterian award was a great achievement, in addition to previous recognition of Dr Azzopardi’s work. He said: The multidisciplinary nature of the research is a good example of the ARCH aims.

“Dr Azzopardi’s research showcases how the Medical School is working closely with our two health boards in areas of shared strength and expertise to really benefit our patients.”

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean of the Medical School and ARCH board member added: “The Medical School is one of the UK’s top performers for its research quality and research environment  so we are delighted to see Dr Azzopardi set such a high standard with his work.

“We congratulate Ernest and look forward to seeing his continued work benefit patients across the entire ARCH region of South West Wales and beyond.”

24 of 36

Surgeon’s pioneering infection research is honoured with “highest accolade”

Ernest Azzopardi, a Swansea surgeon has been awarded one of his profession’s highest accolades for his research

A SWANSEA surgeon who has been awarded one of his profession’s highest accolades for his research has praised the innovation and collaboration currently taking place in South West Wales.

Ernest Azzopardi, who divides his time between ABMU’s Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery and Swansea University’s Medical School, is pioneering research into burn and surgical infection.

Dr Azzopardi has received the coveted Hunterian Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in England. The award is given to a body of work which will lead to substantial clinical change in the way patients are treated.

And Dr Azzopardi says the region’s unique approach to combining health and science through the ARCH Programme is helping to not only foster a real spirit of innovation in the NHS but will also lead to breakthroughs in the way patients are treated.

Dr Azzopardi said: “ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique project. I am honoured to be part of such a transformative approach to solving healthcare challenges.

“By working so closely with the University, the two ARCH health boards are uniquely placed to make major breakthroughs in how we improve the care given to our patients.

“Infection is a major challenge for the NHS. I do believe that through this collaboration between health and science - it is a challenge we will win.”

Dr Azzopardi, who delivered the Hunterian Oration at the winter meeting of the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), added: “Swansea is leading international research which can, and will, change lives.

“I am delighted to have received the Hunterian Medal – it is an international award which is open to all clinicians, not just surgeons, so I was very proud to receive it.

“I am fortunate in receiving so much support from both Swansea University Medical School and its research arm, the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and within the Welsh Centre for Burns and Plastic Surgery at Morriston.

“I am also inspired by the dedication of colleagues at the Burns Centre, which receives major burns from all over the UK.”

Dr Azzopardi’s cross-theme research, which focuses on precision medicine, microbiology, nanobiotechnology and clinical surgery, has been recognised by several other awards.

He is the only Hunterian Award recipient to have also been awarded the BAPRAS President’s Medal and, for earlier works, the James Syme Medal from the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh and the T Jackson Prize from the UK British Burns Association.

Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. While some advances in precision medicine have been made, the ARCH partners of Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards are working hard to ensure it is part of the healthcare of the future.

Dr Azzopardi added: “I am honoured to be part of the ARCH collaboration which has helped make my research work possible.

“ARCH is a complex project but by bringing research excellence into the NHS arena we will be able to deliver healthcare which is faster, better and cheaper.”

 

ABMU Executive Medical Director and ARCH board member Hamish Laing has praised Dr Azzopardi’s pioneering research and explains what precision medicine will mean to patients. He said: In the past there has been an intuitive approach towards diagnosis and treatment. Precision medicine brings together research, new tools and techniques to allow for a faster and more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan, personalised for the patient.

"The main aim of this approach is to provide the right drug at the right dose to the right patient at the right time.

“Infection is a major concern in surgery and especially following severe burns. I am delighted that Dr Azzopardi is leading the way in infection research and its translation into real patient benefit. This award is thoroughly deserved.

“His research work really could be a global breakthrough for infection control.”

Dr Azzopardi’s research has been supported by the Welsh Government’s Welsh Clinical Academic Track (WCAT) initiative, which integrates clinical training with academic progression and he is the first WCAT fellow in plastic surgery.

He began his post-doctoral research at Swansea University in 2013 within the reconstructive surgery and regenerative medicine group led by Professor Iain Whitaker and was later appointed honorary senior clinical lecturer.

Professor Whitaker said the Hunterian award was a great achievement, in addition to previous recognition of Dr Azzopardi’s work. He said: The multidisciplinary nature of the research is a good example of the ARCH aims.

“Dr Azzopardi’s research showcases how the Medical School is working closely with our two health boards in areas of shared strength and expertise to really benefit our patients.”

Professor Keith Lloyd, Dean of the Medical School and ARCH board member added: “The Medical School is one of the UK’s top performers for its research quality and research environment  so we are delighted to see Dr Azzopardi set such a high standard with his work.

“We congratulate Ernest and look forward to seeing his continued work benefit patients across the entire ARCH region of South West Wales and beyond.”

24 of 36

Economy Minister visits Llanelli to drive forward multi-million pound Wellness & Life Science Village

Multi-million pound Carmarthenshire Council-led project will be the first of its kind and is being developed through ARCH

DISCUSSIONS are underway between the Welsh Government and Carmarthenshire Council to drive forward plans for a unique Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes in Llanelli.

The multi-million pound Carmarthenshire Council-led project will be the first of its kind and is being developed through ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) – a unique partnership between  ABMU and Hywel Dda Health Boards and Swansea University.

ARCH provides a new model for delivering healthcare specifically planned for today’s increasingly complex needs.

 The Wellness and Life Science Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellbeing – partnering first-class health, research and life science, with innovative leisure opportunities to help people live healthy lives.

 

Economy Minister Edwina Hart met representatives from ARCH and the council on a visit to the proposed site at Delta Lakes.  The Minister updated the group and said discussions were underway between the Welsh Government and the council to extend an existing Joint Venture agreement to facilitate the delivery of the Village, subject to an agreed business plan.

 

The Minister said: “These are exciting plans and form an integral part of the ARCH initiative that aims to improve the quality of health care and also boost the region’s economy and skills base in a sustainable way.

“We are currently discussing provisions to allow this innovative development to happen.”

 

The concept of a Wellness and Life Science Village followed talks on plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli and the council’s desire to work collaboratively with health partners, putting additional investment into facilities and services to help prevent ill-health and reduce pressure on front-line health care.

Scoping work to fine-tune details of the pioneering scheme is underway, with potential to include a state-of-the-art wellness and leisure centre, and life science and research facilities, as well as the possibility of a hotel, conferencing and high-spec business suites. 

Partners have now signed a Memorandum of Understanding to develop the project.

 

Councillorr Meryl Gravell, Executive Board Member for regeneration and Chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, said: “The Wellness and Life Science Village will lead the way in transforming wellbeing services, focusing on preventative health care.

“We want to deliver cutting-edge wellness, care and research facilities here in Llanelli, and regenerate a prime location on Carmarthenshire’s coast.”

 

Hywel Dda’s Executive lead for ARCH, Professor Kathryn Davies, said: “This project shows the importance of a collabora­tive approach between all sectors. To achieve a real step-change in the health of our communities, we must understand the impact wellness has on all areas and sectors - medi­cine, research, education, sport, community public health hospitality, business and commerce.”

 

ARCH board member and ABMU Director of Strategy Sian Harrop-Griffiths, who was at the recent ministerial visit to Delta Lakes, added: “Through ARCH we are working to provide health care for patients in a community-based setting, which will help divert them from entering secondary care and help ease the pressure on our hospitals.

We want people to access services based on informed choice, prevention, diagnosis and self-care rather than heading straight to their GP or Emergency Departments.”

 

The Minister was joined on the site visit by Council Leader Cllr Emlyn Dole; Cllr Meryl Gravell, Julie James, Independent Board Member of Hywel Dda University Health Board; Mark Clement, Vice President of Swansea University and Dean of the School of Management; and ABMU’s Sian Harrop-Griffiths.

 

25 of 36

Economy Minister visits Llanelli to drive forward multi-million pound Wellness & Life Science Village

Multi-million pound Carmarthenshire Council-led project will be the first of its kind and is being developed through ARCH

DISCUSSIONS are underway between the Welsh Government and Carmarthenshire Council to drive forward plans for a unique Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes in Llanelli.

The multi-million pound Carmarthenshire Council-led project will be the first of its kind and is being developed through ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) – a unique partnership between  ABMU and Hywel Dda Health Boards and Swansea University.

ARCH provides a new model for delivering healthcare specifically planned for today’s increasingly complex needs.

 The Wellness and Life Science Village aims to transform the way the region delivers care and promotes wellbeing – partnering first-class health, research and life science, with innovative leisure opportunities to help people live healthy lives.

 

Economy Minister Edwina Hart met representatives from ARCH and the council on a visit to the proposed site at Delta Lakes.  The Minister updated the group and said discussions were underway between the Welsh Government and the council to extend an existing Joint Venture agreement to facilitate the delivery of the Village, subject to an agreed business plan.

 

The Minister said: “These are exciting plans and form an integral part of the ARCH initiative that aims to improve the quality of health care and also boost the region’s economy and skills base in a sustainable way.

“We are currently discussing provisions to allow this innovative development to happen.”

 

The concept of a Wellness and Life Science Village followed talks on plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli and the council’s desire to work collaboratively with health partners, putting additional investment into facilities and services to help prevent ill-health and reduce pressure on front-line health care.

Scoping work to fine-tune details of the pioneering scheme is underway, with potential to include a state-of-the-art wellness and leisure centre, and life science and research facilities, as well as the possibility of a hotel, conferencing and high-spec business suites. 

Partners have now signed a Memorandum of Understanding to develop the project.

 

Councillorr Meryl Gravell, Executive Board Member for regeneration and Chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, said: “The Wellness and Life Science Village will lead the way in transforming wellbeing services, focusing on preventative health care.

“We want to deliver cutting-edge wellness, care and research facilities here in Llanelli, and regenerate a prime location on Carmarthenshire’s coast.”

 

Hywel Dda’s Executive lead for ARCH, Professor Kathryn Davies, said: “This project shows the importance of a collabora­tive approach between all sectors. To achieve a real step-change in the health of our communities, we must understand the impact wellness has on all areas and sectors - medi­cine, research, education, sport, community public health hospitality, business and commerce.”

 

ARCH board member and ABMU Director of Strategy Sian Harrop-Griffiths, who was at the recent ministerial visit to Delta Lakes, added: “Through ARCH we are working to provide health care for patients in a community-based setting, which will help divert them from entering secondary care and help ease the pressure on our hospitals.

We want people to access services based on informed choice, prevention, diagnosis and self-care rather than heading straight to their GP or Emergency Departments.”

 

The Minister was joined on the site visit by Council Leader Cllr Emlyn Dole; Cllr Meryl Gravell, Julie James, Independent Board Member of Hywel Dda University Health Board; Mark Clement, Vice President of Swansea University and Dean of the School of Management; and ABMU’s Sian Harrop-Griffiths.

 

25 of 36

Thriving life science firms in Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science praised by Minister

Edwina Hart met with firms based at the Medical School’s Institute of Life Science (ILS) after announcing Wales has attracted £50million of investment

Economy Minister Edwina Hart has praised the growing life science sector in South West Wales during a visit of Swansea University.

Edwina Hart met with firms based at the Medical School’s Institute of Life Science (ILS) after announcing Wales has attracted £50million of investment from to support innovation and economic growth.

The Minister chose to visit the ILS to mark the record investment figures and met with several highly innovative, technology driven companies who are based at the Singleton Health Campus.

The investment from Innovate UK in the current financial year – is a record figure and brings the total committed to over £100million during the Welsh Government’s current term of office

The ILS-based firms have successfully leveraged over £3million in Innovate UK funding, as well as benefitting from Welsh Government support. 

The Minister, who was guided around the Medical School’s ILS by Professor Keith Lloyd and the Centre for Nanohealth by Professor Steve Conlan, said: Innovation Wales emphasised the need to improve collaboration between businesses, academia and others looking to access UK and EU funding streams.

 “Today’s record figures clearly illustrate that this message is getting across and delivering results. In total more than 530 projects have benefited from £50million of Innovate UK funding during the Welsh Government’s current term in office.

“Many of these are SMEs and spin-out companies, while the larger successful examples of collaboration in action include the strategically important ‘big ticket’ announcements like the £50m Compound Semiconductor Catapult. This was achieved by a strong partnership between the Welsh Government, academia and the private sector.

 “Innovation Wales also underlined the need to recognise and exploit our strengths and to build on our distinct and genuine areas of excellence identified in Science for Wales.

 “Those areas of excellence are now all benefitting from Innovate UK funding and include our priority economic sectors ranging from Life Sciences and Health to Advanced Engineering and Materials.”

The Minister stated that innovation is the key to the future success of the Welsh economy and that in order to grow, Welsh businesses must evolve, and to evolve they must innovate.

The ILS, which is the research arm of the Medical School, is playing a  key role in the ARCH Programme.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. Through innovation and collaboration, the ARCH partners are working to bring research and innovation together with the NHS to transform the way healthcare is delivered in South West Wales.

ARCH also aims to drive inward investment and create new jobs by supporting the life science cluster which is thriving in this region. The ILS.

Mrs Hart added: “It is not just about new technologies; it is about successfully applying them to the markets of the future in order to achieve commercial success. Tackling this journey from concept to commercialisation, and to share some of the risk is where Innovate UK and Welsh Government step in.  

 “Welsh Government and Innovate UK work together to provide support for innovative SMEs with high-growth potential and help innovative companies work with their investors so their ideas can be developed commercially. These successful companies at ILS are benefiting from that support and we will build on the encouraging growth of Welsh success in securing Innovate UK funding.”

Medical School Dean and ARCH board member, Professor Keith Lloyd,  said: The vision for the ILS was to advance medical science through research and innovation for the benefit of human health, and to link those benefits to the economy by encouraging interaction with other organisations in a spirit of open innovation. 

 “We are currently working towards a strategy which will support the commercialisation of intellectual property (IP) within the NHS in Wales.

“This is an exciting project which, through ARCH, will unlock the innovation taking place in our health boards and support its development to benefit our patients.

“We are proud that our business centre is home to growing band of companies which are benefitting from the Welsh Government support and Innovate UK funding.

“And we were delighted to be able to showcase this
ever-growing sector to the Minster during her visit.”

Dr Neil Morgan, of Innovate UK, added: “The ILS is an important centre for the translation of world-class research. The team is fostering innovative young companies and the positive economic impact they can bring.

“Over the past six years Innovate UK has invested more than £50million in over 300 projects in Wales, a number of which are delivered through the ILS and the businesses it works with.

“We look forward to continuing our engagement with the ILS and innovation in the ARCH region in the years to come.”

26 of 36

Thriving life science firms in Swansea University’s Institute of Life Science praised by Minister

Edwina Hart met with firms based at the Medical School’s Institute of Life Science (ILS) after announcing Wales has attracted £50million of investment

Economy Minister Edwina Hart has praised the growing life science sector in South West Wales during a visit of Swansea University.

Edwina Hart met with firms based at the Medical School’s Institute of Life Science (ILS) after announcing Wales has attracted £50million of investment from to support innovation and economic growth.

The Minister chose to visit the ILS to mark the record investment figures and met with several highly innovative, technology driven companies who are based at the Singleton Health Campus.

The investment from Innovate UK in the current financial year – is a record figure and brings the total committed to over £100million during the Welsh Government’s current term of office

The ILS-based firms have successfully leveraged over £3million in Innovate UK funding, as well as benefitting from Welsh Government support. 

The Minister, who was guided around the Medical School’s ILS by Professor Keith Lloyd and the Centre for Nanohealth by Professor Steve Conlan, said: Innovation Wales emphasised the need to improve collaboration between businesses, academia and others looking to access UK and EU funding streams.

 “Today’s record figures clearly illustrate that this message is getting across and delivering results. In total more than 530 projects have benefited from £50million of Innovate UK funding during the Welsh Government’s current term in office.

“Many of these are SMEs and spin-out companies, while the larger successful examples of collaboration in action include the strategically important ‘big ticket’ announcements like the £50m Compound Semiconductor Catapult. This was achieved by a strong partnership between the Welsh Government, academia and the private sector.

 “Innovation Wales also underlined the need to recognise and exploit our strengths and to build on our distinct and genuine areas of excellence identified in Science for Wales.

 “Those areas of excellence are now all benefitting from Innovate UK funding and include our priority economic sectors ranging from Life Sciences and Health to Advanced Engineering and Materials.”

The Minister stated that innovation is the key to the future success of the Welsh economy and that in order to grow, Welsh businesses must evolve, and to evolve they must innovate.

The ILS, which is the research arm of the Medical School, is playing a  key role in the ARCH Programme.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University and ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. Through innovation and collaboration, the ARCH partners are working to bring research and innovation together with the NHS to transform the way healthcare is delivered in South West Wales.

ARCH also aims to drive inward investment and create new jobs by supporting the life science cluster which is thriving in this region. The ILS.

Mrs Hart added: “It is not just about new technologies; it is about successfully applying them to the markets of the future in order to achieve commercial success. Tackling this journey from concept to commercialisation, and to share some of the risk is where Innovate UK and Welsh Government step in.  

 “Welsh Government and Innovate UK work together to provide support for innovative SMEs with high-growth potential and help innovative companies work with their investors so their ideas can be developed commercially. These successful companies at ILS are benefiting from that support and we will build on the encouraging growth of Welsh success in securing Innovate UK funding.”

Medical School Dean and ARCH board member, Professor Keith Lloyd,  said: The vision for the ILS was to advance medical science through research and innovation for the benefit of human health, and to link those benefits to the economy by encouraging interaction with other organisations in a spirit of open innovation. 

 “We are currently working towards a strategy which will support the commercialisation of intellectual property (IP) within the NHS in Wales.

“This is an exciting project which, through ARCH, will unlock the innovation taking place in our health boards and support its development to benefit our patients.

“We are proud that our business centre is home to growing band of companies which are benefitting from the Welsh Government support and Innovate UK funding.

“And we were delighted to be able to showcase this
ever-growing sector to the Minster during her visit.”

Dr Neil Morgan, of Innovate UK, added: “The ILS is an important centre for the translation of world-class research. The team is fostering innovative young companies and the positive economic impact they can bring.

“Over the past six years Innovate UK has invested more than £50million in over 300 projects in Wales, a number of which are delivered through the ILS and the businesses it works with.

“We look forward to continuing our engagement with the ILS and innovation in the ARCH region in the years to come.”

26 of 36

Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village will be "big" for entire region

New ARCH project will create 1,000 jobs

A REVOLUTIONARY Carmarthenshire scheme to regenerate Llanelli is pushing ahead at pace and has laid out some pioneering ideas for improving the health of the entire region.

The Carmarthenshire Council-led project to create a Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes, through the ARCH health programme, is starting to become a reality as work now begins to scope out the exact details of the multi-million pound scheme.

The ARCH partners have been working with Carmarthenshire Council to develop their plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli. Through innovative thinking, working together to “think outside of the box” and wanting to achieve a common goal of improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the region, the Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village has grown from a simple idea to a ground-breaking reality.

Carmarthenshire Councillor Meryl Gravell, who is chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, has been a driving force in not only developing the idea for the wellness village, but in making sure it is delivered. And her innovation and commitment to the project is now bearing fruit as the partners look to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to continue the project.

Councillor Gravell said: “This MoU allows each of the partners involved in the project to begin more detailed work into the finer details of what will be included in the village.

“Carmarthenshire Council and the ARCH partners have now also agreed to jointly fund a project manager position which we will be recruiting for imminently.”

Councillor Gravell said she is delighted by the forward-thinking nature of the project, and added that the ambitious project will not only be the first of its kind for Wales, but also for the UK.

Councillor Gravell said: “We knew as a council that we needed to invest in building a new leisure centre facility in Llanelli. Following a round table event held by the ARCH partners last year, which discussed the wellness agenda in Wales, we saw an opportunity to work together and think in very a different way.  And now, less than 7 months on, we are proving that when we work together with an open mind – anything is possible.

“For far too long in Wales, we have accepted second best. This project is indeed ambitious but it shows we are aiming high.

“In just under a year, this kind of blue sky thinking encouraged by the  ARCH programme, has actually started to take shape.”

Councillor Gravell said the wellness agenda was a key driver in the project saying: “We must take the pressure off the local health boards. Prevention and personal responsibility for wellness and wellbeing is vital for our communities.”

Hywel Dda’s Executive lead for ARCH, Professor Kathryn Davies, added that the wellness village would allow the region to fundamentally transform the way it delivers care.  

She said: “We must re-think the health­care system and change the nature of Healthcare professionals from being less like ‘fixers’ and more like ‘coaches.’ 

“There is a need to rebalance the approach from only treating ill health and disease reactively and start focusing on lifelong lifestyle changes. We want to work with the whole community to support individuals make healthy life choices for themselves and their families.

“The Delta Lakes project shows the importance of a
collabora­tive transparent approach between all sectors. To achieve a real step-change in the health of our communities, we must understand the impact wellness has on all areas and sectors - medi­cine, research, education, sport, community public health hospitality, business and commerce.”

She added: ’’Hywel Dda University Health Board wants to see this development place local GPs, supported by multi professional Primary Care teams at the heart of the development. We want to see the skills of pharmacists, therapists, psychologists, exercise/sports therapists, eye and dental care staff working within this development all supporting people to live long and healthy lives in the way they choose to do so.’’

“There are five ways to wellness: connecting with others, being physically active, ongoing learning, mindfulness and giving. These wide-ranging wellness principles need to be put into every day practice to have impact.

“ARCH will help this happen through projects such as Delta Lakes.”

The value of the scheme was initially estimated at £60million, it is now thought that the total investment in the area will be far greater.

Meryl added: “There is much work to be done in terms of the feasibility but I think it is fair to say we hope we will see an investment into the area of in excess of £100million. As well as improving health in the area, we are keen to see this project help boost the local economy and create new jobs. We could be looking at many highly-paid jobs being created here in Carmarthenshire as a result of this scheme.”

Work has now begun to detail what will be included at the site, but elements which may potentially be included are state-of-the-art wellness/leisure centre, hydrotherapy pool, Institute of Life Science@ Hywel Dda, expansion of the Joint Clinical Research Facility (J-CRF) to recruit for clinical trials, a Health & Wellbeing Centre as well as hotel and conferencing and high spec business facilities.

Councillor Gravell, who is vice-chair of the Swansea Bay City Region Board, reiterated the role of partnership working and how important it has been in putting this regional project together.

 “I feel we are being braver because we are doing it together. The ARCH ethos is built on collaboration and innovation – and this project really is collaboration at its best. This project is a game-changer for our region.  

“This is big,” she added.

27 of 36

Llanelli Wellness & Life Science Village will be "big" for entire region

New ARCH project will create 1,000 jobs

A REVOLUTIONARY Carmarthenshire scheme to regenerate Llanelli is pushing ahead at pace and has laid out some pioneering ideas for improving the health of the entire region.

The Carmarthenshire Council-led project to create a Wellness and Life Science Village at Delta Lakes, through the ARCH health programme, is starting to become a reality as work now begins to scope out the exact details of the multi-million pound scheme.

The ARCH partners have been working with Carmarthenshire Council to develop their plans to build a new leisure centre in Llanelli. Through innovative thinking, working together to “think outside of the box” and wanting to achieve a common goal of improving the health, wealth and wellbeing of the region, the Llanelli Wellness and Life Science Village has grown from a simple idea to a ground-breaking reality.

Carmarthenshire Councillor Meryl Gravell, who is chair of the ARCH Wellness and Wellbeing working group, has been a driving force in not only developing the idea for the wellness village, but in making sure it is delivered. And her innovation and commitment to the project is now bearing fruit as the partners look to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to continue the project.

Councillor Gravell said: “This MoU allows each of the partners involved in the project to begin more detailed work into the finer details of what will be included in the village.

“Carmarthenshire Council and the ARCH partners have now also agreed to jointly fund a project manager position which we will be recruiting for imminently.”

Councillor Gravell said she is delighted by the forward-thinking nature of the project, and added that the ambitious project will not only be the first of its kind for Wales, but also for the UK.

Councillor Gravell said: “We knew as a council that we needed to invest in building a new leisure centre facility in Llanelli. Following a round table event held by the ARCH partners last year, which discussed the wellness agenda in Wales, we saw an opportunity to work together and think in very a different way.  And now, less than 7 months on, we are proving that when we work together with an open mind – anything is possible.

“For far too long in Wales, we have accepted second best. This project is indeed ambitious but it shows we are aiming high.

“In just under a year, this kind of blue sky thinking encouraged by the  ARCH programme, has actually started to take shape.”

Councillor Gravell said the wellness agenda was a key driver in the project saying: “We must take the pressure off the local health boards. Prevention and personal responsibility for wellness and wellbeing is vital for our communities.”

Hywel Dda’s Executive lead for ARCH, Professor Kathryn Davies, added that the wellness village would allow the region to fundamentally transform the way it delivers care.  

She said: “We must re-think the health­care system and change the nature of Healthcare professionals from being less like ‘fixers’ and more like ‘coaches.’ 

“There is a need to rebalance the approach from only treating ill health and disease reactively and start focusing on lifelong lifestyle changes. We want to work with the whole community to support individuals make healthy life choices for themselves and their families.

“The Delta Lakes project shows the importance of a
collabora­tive transparent approach between all sectors. To achieve a real step-change in the health of our communities, we must understand the impact wellness has on all areas and sectors - medi­cine, research, education, sport, community public health hospitality, business and commerce.”

She added: ’’Hywel Dda University Health Board wants to see this development place local GPs, supported by multi professional Primary Care teams at the heart of the development. We want to see the skills of pharmacists, therapists, psychologists, exercise/sports therapists, eye and dental care staff working within this development all supporting people to live long and healthy lives in the way they choose to do so.’’

“There are five ways to wellness: connecting with others, being physically active, ongoing learning, mindfulness and giving. These wide-ranging wellness principles need to be put into every day practice to have impact.

“ARCH will help this happen through projects such as Delta Lakes.”

The value of the scheme was initially estimated at £60million, it is now thought that the total investment in the area will be far greater.

Meryl added: “There is much work to be done in terms of the feasibility but I think it is fair to say we hope we will see an investment into the area of in excess of £100million. As well as improving health in the area, we are keen to see this project help boost the local economy and create new jobs. We could be looking at many highly-paid jobs being created here in Carmarthenshire as a result of this scheme.”

Work has now begun to detail what will be included at the site, but elements which may potentially be included are state-of-the-art wellness/leisure centre, hydrotherapy pool, Institute of Life Science@ Hywel Dda, expansion of the Joint Clinical Research Facility (J-CRF) to recruit for clinical trials, a Health & Wellbeing Centre as well as hotel and conferencing and high spec business facilities.

Councillor Gravell, who is vice-chair of the Swansea Bay City Region Board, reiterated the role of partnership working and how important it has been in putting this regional project together.

 “I feel we are being braver because we are doing it together. The ARCH ethos is built on collaboration and innovation – and this project really is collaboration at its best. This project is a game-changer for our region.  

“This is big,” she added.

27 of 36

Regional Business Awards dominated by health & life science wins

ARCH's Prof Marc Clement is honoured with Lifetime Achievement Award

THE South West Wales life science and health sector won big at the region’s annual Business Awards.

 

The South Wales Evening Post and Business Life Business Awards 2016 were held at Swansea’s Brangwyn Hall last week and saw the great and the good for the business world gather to celebrate a year of success.

 

The Life Science sector won in three categories and proved why it is one of Wales’s fastest growing sectors.

Haemair Ltd, which is an Institute of Life Science (ILS)-based firm, picked up the Innovation title, while Graham Foster from ILS’s Calon Cardio scooped Entrepreneur of the Year. LeadIn won Business of the Year (0-25 employees) and the big prize of the night, Lifetime Achievement was presented to Swansea University Professor Marc Clement.

Swansea University’s ILS is a key part of the ARCH Programme which is working to improve the health and wealth of South West Wales through collaboration and innovation.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. The three organisations are working together to transform the way healthcare is delivered, develop the next generation of doctors, nurse, healthcare workers and researchers and also boost the local economy and create new jobs.

The ILS is the research and innovation arm of Swansea University’s Medical School and ARCH builds on its decade of success which has seen the ILS  help secure a total of £42million infrastructure funding, created more than 800 jobs, and in turn attracted more than £50million of  investment.

 

 

Lifetime Achievement winner professor Marc Clement is the Executive Chair at the Institute of Life Science at Swansea University Medical School, Vice-President of Swansea University with a specific role of developing major strategic projects; and Dean of the School of Management. He is also an ARCH Programme board member.

Professor Clement said he was overwhelmed at receiving the award saying: “It was a very special night for me. It meant a lot to receive the award but I have always worked as part of a team, and I thank all my colleagues for their enduring support.”

South Wales Evening Post editor Jonathan Roberts praised the success of professor Clement, telling a packed Brangwyn Hall: “Despite his many roles within academia Marc has also held a number of senior public appointments serving on, and chairing, committees on behalf of Welsh Government and he is also  a successful entrepreneur having founded several businesses and  becoming the named inventor of many patents in the field of medical devices. He has also developed a number of large-scale projects and initiatives in supercomputing and Big Data. 

“Seemingly not needing to ever sleep, this one-man whirlwind became a Founding Director of High Performance Computing Wales and established the original Blue C Supercomputer at the ILS and most recently, he has been a driving force in the conception, and development of, the innovative and visionary ARCH Programme.

“It is this project which is the realisation of our winner’s ambition to bring together science and the health service to significantly improve the health and wealth of his much-loved Wales.

“His goal was always to make lives in Wales - better – and through ARCH he is realising these ambitions.”

 

ARCH and ABMU health board chair Andrew Davies sent a special video message praising Marc’s career and his enthusiasm for improving the region. Professor Davies said: “Marc’s contribution to this region and the health and life science sectors is exceptional.

He deserves this honour and I congratulate him on this special recognition.”

Innovation winner Haemair Ltd is developing an oxygenator to help treat chronic lung disease, Calon Cardio is working to improve healthcare for patients by developing a pump to offer an alternative therapy for advanced heart failure. LeadIn, is a Finnish company that designs user-friendly technology products. Its software development centre is based at the ILS in Swansea and has created 30 skilled jobs.

Swansea University life science impact and engagement manager  Kevin Fernquest added: “The life science sector is one of Wales’s fastest growing sectors. We are privileged here in South West Wales to have so many emerging, innovative firms which are helping to not only boost the local economy but also transform lives with their research, innovation and enterprise.

“It is great to see so many ILS-affiliated firms get the recognition they deserve from the business community.”

28 of 36

Regional Business Awards dominated by health & life science wins

ARCH's Prof Marc Clement is honoured with Lifetime Achievement Award

THE South West Wales life science and health sector won big at the region’s annual Business Awards.

 

The South Wales Evening Post and Business Life Business Awards 2016 were held at Swansea’s Brangwyn Hall last week and saw the great and the good for the business world gather to celebrate a year of success.

 

The Life Science sector won in three categories and proved why it is one of Wales’s fastest growing sectors.

Haemair Ltd, which is an Institute of Life Science (ILS)-based firm, picked up the Innovation title, while Graham Foster from ILS’s Calon Cardio scooped Entrepreneur of the Year. LeadIn won Business of the Year (0-25 employees) and the big prize of the night, Lifetime Achievement was presented to Swansea University Professor Marc Clement.

Swansea University’s ILS is a key part of the ARCH Programme which is working to improve the health and wealth of South West Wales through collaboration and innovation.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between Swansea University, ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards. The three organisations are working together to transform the way healthcare is delivered, develop the next generation of doctors, nurse, healthcare workers and researchers and also boost the local economy and create new jobs.

The ILS is the research and innovation arm of Swansea University’s Medical School and ARCH builds on its decade of success which has seen the ILS  help secure a total of £42million infrastructure funding, created more than 800 jobs, and in turn attracted more than £50million of  investment.

 

 

Lifetime Achievement winner professor Marc Clement is the Executive Chair at the Institute of Life Science at Swansea University Medical School, Vice-President of Swansea University with a specific role of developing major strategic projects; and Dean of the School of Management. He is also an ARCH Programme board member.

Professor Clement said he was overwhelmed at receiving the award saying: “It was a very special night for me. It meant a lot to receive the award but I have always worked as part of a team, and I thank all my colleagues for their enduring support.”

South Wales Evening Post editor Jonathan Roberts praised the success of professor Clement, telling a packed Brangwyn Hall: “Despite his many roles within academia Marc has also held a number of senior public appointments serving on, and chairing, committees on behalf of Welsh Government and he is also  a successful entrepreneur having founded several businesses and  becoming the named inventor of many patents in the field of medical devices. He has also developed a number of large-scale projects and initiatives in supercomputing and Big Data. 

“Seemingly not needing to ever sleep, this one-man whirlwind became a Founding Director of High Performance Computing Wales and established the original Blue C Supercomputer at the ILS and most recently, he has been a driving force in the conception, and development of, the innovative and visionary ARCH Programme.

“It is this project which is the realisation of our winner’s ambition to bring together science and the health service to significantly improve the health and wealth of his much-loved Wales.

“His goal was always to make lives in Wales - better – and through ARCH he is realising these ambitions.”

 

ARCH and ABMU health board chair Andrew Davies sent a special video message praising Marc’s career and his enthusiasm for improving the region. Professor Davies said: “Marc’s contribution to this region and the health and life science sectors is exceptional.

He deserves this honour and I congratulate him on this special recognition.”

Innovation winner Haemair Ltd is developing an oxygenator to help treat chronic lung disease, Calon Cardio is working to improve healthcare for patients by developing a pump to offer an alternative therapy for advanced heart failure. LeadIn, is a Finnish company that designs user-friendly technology products. Its software development centre is based at the ILS in Swansea and has created 30 skilled jobs.

Swansea University life science impact and engagement manager  Kevin Fernquest added: “The life science sector is one of Wales’s fastest growing sectors. We are privileged here in South West Wales to have so many emerging, innovative firms which are helping to not only boost the local economy but also transform lives with their research, innovation and enterprise.

“It is great to see so many ILS-affiliated firms get the recognition they deserve from the business community.”

28 of 36

South West Wales leads the way in thriving Welsh Life Science sector

Health and Wellbeing Academy to open in September

SOUTH WEST WALES has proven it is leading the way in life science research and innovation following a hugely successful BioWales 2016 event this week and some big announcements.

BioWales, the Welsh Government’s life science conference was held in Cardiff’s Millennium Centre over two days, and saw some of the world’s biggest health and life science players come together. Swansea University’s Professor Marc Clement, who is one of the driving forces in establishing ARCH, was a keynote speaker at the Cardiff conference this week.

Professor Clement, who had just flown in from Brussels after presenting to the European Commission on the digital, data-driven aims of the ARCH partners, presented to a packed auditorium. He announced the opening of a new Health and Wellbeing Academy in Swansea in the autumn and also talked about the programme’s links with Obama’s MoonShot 2020 mission. The US President launched his mission to find a cure for cancer during his last address of the union in January. 

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is now establishing links to be part of this world-changing mission and is also working with Welsh Government to create a Genomics Strategy for Wales. Professor Clement, Dean of Swansea University’s School of Management and Executive Chair of the Institute of Life Science said: “The theme of this year’s BioWales was Connect and Collaborate – and ARCH is an example of collaboration at its very best!

“With the ARCH partners forging ahead with projects such as the £100million Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli, the opening of a health and Wellbeing Academy in Swansea, the potential links with Obama’s MoonShot mission thanks to our work on genomics and precision medicine, AND  being part of the £500million Swansea Bay City Region deal which is now on the table – this is a very exciting time to live in this part of Wales.”

Life science is now one of Wales’s fastest growing and most innovative industries, employing over 11,000 people in more than 350 companies and contributing around £2 billion to the Welsh economy every year. And thanks to the work of the ARCH partners, South West Wales is now at the forefront of a number of exciting and pioneering developments.

The Health and Wellbeing Academy project is being driven by Swansea University’s College of Human and Health Science and will open its doors in September. Based at the Singleton Health Campus it will offer  services such as audiology, maternal family health and wellbeing services, osteoporosis and osteopathy clinics, psychological therapies, memory clinic and dementia support services as well as general health screening and cardiac and respiratory assessments.

Professor Ceri Phillips, Head of the college and ARCH Programme board member, says the innovative academy concept encapsulates everything ARCH aims to achieve in terms of transforming the way the NHS delivers care,  bringing that care closer to people’s homes and developing the next generation of doctors, nurses and healthcare workers.

Professor Phillips said: “We are delighted to announce the creation of a new Health and Wellbeing Academy as part of ARCH. The Academy aims to ease pressure on the health service, particularly for our GPs and A&E departments

“It is a unique approach aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of the people living across the ARCH region through a range of treatments and alternative ways for patients to manage their care.

“We also want to help improve care for patients who face delays in diagnosis and assessments by providing alternative options.”

Four colleges from Swansea University are playing key roles in delivering the ARCH ambitions, the Medical School and its research arm the Institute of Life Science (ILS), School of Management and College for Human and Health Science.

ARCH Programme board member and ABMU Medical Director Hamish Laing has praised  the work of the College for Human and Health Science and says the Academy will help change models of care offered in this area. Mr Laing said: “The college has an established track record for providing first class learning, teaching and research opportunities for students.

“Their vision to create an Academy at Singleton will help encourage personal responsibility for health and wellness which will deliver real advances in our Prudent Healthcare strategy and also help take the pressure off our hospitals.

“It was great to hear Professor Marc Clement make the announcement at this week’s BioWales event.”

The College of Human and Health Science is the largest provider of non-medical health professions education in Wales, covering a wide range of areas from nursing and paramedic science, to midwifery, audiology, osteopathy, cardiology and social work.

Professor Phillips said that although the Academy could not directly influence current staffing shortages in the NHS it would help reduce demand on an already stretched workforce.

 He said: Our intention is to assist primary care by taking referrals for assessment.

“One of the indicators of success of the Academy will be the number of patients diverted from entering secondary care and receiving effective community-based care instead – possibly within the Academy itself  – but ideally closer to their own homes.  

“This reduction in demand will help take pressure off the stretched workforce in secondary care and offer alternatives to GPS when managing patients with more complex health needs.

“We want people to be able to access services based on informed choice, prevention, diagnosis and self-care rather than heading straight to their GP or A&E departments for issues which could be resolved in another way.

“We also want to enrich the experience of our students, the Academy will help provide new opportunities for student placements and interactions with patients which will form part of their education.”

Professor Phillips added that the Academy concept was not limited to Swansea patients and said there was an opportunity to develop and provide similar services which complement existing service provision, across the entire South West Wales region.

He said: “The Wellness Village project in Llanelli is proof that ARCH is working with a regional view in mind.

“The College is working alongside Carmarthenshire Council and the health boards to ensure a similar model is available to people living in the Hywel Dda area.”

 “GPs can refer patients to the Academy for detailed assessments which will speed up the process for patients and avoiding the need for unnecessary additional GP consultations.

“When patients self-refer to the Academy for assessments and diagnostics they will be armed with a detailed personalised report which can then be used by their GP if necessary.”

Professor Phillips added: “We all realise it’s time to re-think the health­care system. There is a need to rebalance the traditional approach of only treating ill health reactively and start focusing on lifelong lifestyle changes and prevention rather than cure.”

 

29 of 36

South West Wales leads the way in thriving Welsh Life Science sector

Health and Wellbeing Academy to open in September

SOUTH WEST WALES has proven it is leading the way in life science research and innovation following a hugely successful BioWales 2016 event this week and some big announcements.

BioWales, the Welsh Government’s life science conference was held in Cardiff’s Millennium Centre over two days, and saw some of the world’s biggest health and life science players come together. Swansea University’s Professor Marc Clement, who is one of the driving forces in establishing ARCH, was a keynote speaker at the Cardiff conference this week.

Professor Clement, who had just flown in from Brussels after presenting to the European Commission on the digital, data-driven aims of the ARCH partners, presented to a packed auditorium. He announced the opening of a new Health and Wellbeing Academy in Swansea in the autumn and also talked about the programme’s links with Obama’s MoonShot 2020 mission. The US President launched his mission to find a cure for cancer during his last address of the union in January. 

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is now establishing links to be part of this world-changing mission and is also working with Welsh Government to create a Genomics Strategy for Wales. Professor Clement, Dean of Swansea University’s School of Management and Executive Chair of the Institute of Life Science said: “The theme of this year’s BioWales was Connect and Collaborate – and ARCH is an example of collaboration at its very best!

“With the ARCH partners forging ahead with projects such as the £100million Wellness and Life Science Village in Llanelli, the opening of a health and Wellbeing Academy in Swansea, the potential links with Obama’s MoonShot mission thanks to our work on genomics and precision medicine, AND  being part of the £500million Swansea Bay City Region deal which is now on the table – this is a very exciting time to live in this part of Wales.”

Life science is now one of Wales’s fastest growing and most innovative industries, employing over 11,000 people in more than 350 companies and contributing around £2 billion to the Welsh economy every year. And thanks to the work of the ARCH partners, South West Wales is now at the forefront of a number of exciting and pioneering developments.

The Health and Wellbeing Academy project is being driven by Swansea University’s College of Human and Health Science and will open its doors in September. Based at the Singleton Health Campus it will offer  services such as audiology, maternal family health and wellbeing services, osteoporosis and osteopathy clinics, psychological therapies, memory clinic and dementia support services as well as general health screening and cardiac and respiratory assessments.

Professor Ceri Phillips, Head of the college and ARCH Programme board member, says the innovative academy concept encapsulates everything ARCH aims to achieve in terms of transforming the way the NHS delivers care,  bringing that care closer to people’s homes and developing the next generation of doctors, nurses and healthcare workers.

Professor Phillips said: “We are delighted to announce the creation of a new Health and Wellbeing Academy as part of ARCH. The Academy aims to ease pressure on the health service, particularly for our GPs and A&E departments

“It is a unique approach aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of the people living across the ARCH region through a range of treatments and alternative ways for patients to manage their care.

“We also want to help improve care for patients who face delays in diagnosis and assessments by providing alternative options.”

Four colleges from Swansea University are playing key roles in delivering the ARCH ambitions, the Medical School and its research arm the Institute of Life Science (ILS), School of Management and College for Human and Health Science.

ARCH Programme board member and ABMU Medical Director Hamish Laing has praised  the work of the College for Human and Health Science and says the Academy will help change models of care offered in this area. Mr Laing said: “The college has an established track record for providing first class learning, teaching and research opportunities for students.

“Their vision to create an Academy at Singleton will help encourage personal responsibility for health and wellness which will deliver real advances in our Prudent Healthcare strategy and also help take the pressure off our hospitals.

“It was great to hear Professor Marc Clement make the announcement at this week’s BioWales event.”

The College of Human and Health Science is the largest provider of non-medical health professions education in Wales, covering a wide range of areas from nursing and paramedic science, to midwifery, audiology, osteopathy, cardiology and social work.

Professor Phillips said that although the Academy could not directly influence current staffing shortages in the NHS it would help reduce demand on an already stretched workforce.

 He said: Our intention is to assist primary care by taking referrals for assessment.

“One of the indicators of success of the Academy will be the number of patients diverted from entering secondary care and receiving effective community-based care instead – possibly within the Academy itself  – but ideally closer to their own homes.  

“This reduction in demand will help take pressure off the stretched workforce in secondary care and offer alternatives to GPS when managing patients with more complex health needs.

“We want people to be able to access services based on informed choice, prevention, diagnosis and self-care rather than heading straight to their GP or A&E departments for issues which could be resolved in another way.

“We also want to enrich the experience of our students, the Academy will help provide new opportunities for student placements and interactions with patients which will form part of their education.”

Professor Phillips added that the Academy concept was not limited to Swansea patients and said there was an opportunity to develop and provide similar services which complement existing service provision, across the entire South West Wales region.

He said: “The Wellness Village project in Llanelli is proof that ARCH is working with a regional view in mind.

“The College is working alongside Carmarthenshire Council and the health boards to ensure a similar model is available to people living in the Hywel Dda area.”

 “GPs can refer patients to the Academy for detailed assessments which will speed up the process for patients and avoiding the need for unnecessary additional GP consultations.

“When patients self-refer to the Academy for assessments and diagnostics they will be armed with a detailed personalised report which can then be used by their GP if necessary.”

Professor Phillips added: “We all realise it’s time to re-think the health­care system. There is a need to rebalance the traditional approach of only treating ill health reactively and start focusing on lifelong lifestyle changes and prevention rather than cure.”

 

29 of 36

ILS med-tech firm leads way in transforming diabetes care

City firm pioneers artificial pancreas

A SWANSEA-BASED med-tech business who are pioneering new developments in diabetes care technology have made a ground-breaking advances with an artificial pancreas.

Cellnovo, based in SA1, has developed a digitally connected insulin patch pump which will be used with the artificial pancreas.

The firm, which was founded in the Swansea University Institute of Life Science (ILS)  network, is partnering with US technology company TypeZero, who will use Cellnovo's digitally-connected insulin patch pump alongside its own software in the artificial pancreas. 

The artificial pancreas is designed to automatically monitor and regulate blood-sugar levels in people with Type 1 Diabetes through the delivery of insulin.

Cellnovo is a multi-national company which is headquartered in France but has a major facility in Swansea's SA1 district, which it expanded last year with the renting of a second suite of offices. It recently raised £23 million on Euronext exchange in Paris.

Set up in 2002 with a staff of 75, its products have been developed in the ILS network and their innovative diabetes management system is the first of its kind with mobile connectivity.

This first of its kind  mobile connectivity is able to provide immediate, wireless data updates and display real-time clinical information to patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals. This year should see global deployment of its technology.

Sophie Baratte, chief executive Officer of Cellnovo, said: “We are pleased to be working with TypeZero on this key artificial pancreas programme. This is an important milestone as it will be the first time our diabetes management system will be used by American patients taking part in this leading research programme.

"The Cellnovo diabetes management system is the ideal platform for artificial pancreas system development because of its real-time connected data, as well as its wearability and discreetness.

"The funding by the NIH for the IDCL research programme further demonstrates its key role in AP research.”

 

Cellonovo undertook its clinical trials in Swansea University’s Joint Clinical Research Facility (JCRF) and also manufacturers its products locally. JCRF is a purpose-built clinical research unit based at ABMU’s Morriston Hospital, with a second site at ILS2 on the Singleton Health Campus. Its highly-trained research nursing staff serve a population of more than 500,000 and was established in 1990.

The clinical trials programme is a key component of the ARCH programme. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and Swansea University. ARCH aims to improve the health and wealth of South West Wales through collaboration, innovation and research.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU’s Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development and clinical lead for the Diabetes Research Network Cymru, has praised the ground-breaking work of Cello Novo and the region’s role in helping to develop their products.

Professor Bain, a member of the Wales Diabetes and Endocrine Society and part of the ARCH research and development working group, said: “The involvement of Cellnovo in this pioneering artificial pancreas project highlights the high regard for their insulin patch pump which was developed here in South West Wales.

“This device uses state-of-the-art technology and was first tested in people with diabetes in Swansea’s Joint Clinical Research Facility
(JCRF).”

 

An ARCH spokesman added: “The integration of the existing university campus at Singleton and the hospital site into a new Singleton Health Campus will provide real physical changes which will enhance the collaborative research and innovation activity between the ARCH partners.

“The work of Swansea University’s Medical School, through the ILS, will create a new science MediPark environment where life science research and business can drive the development of the existing local cluster while also attracting world-leading organisations to the region.”

“Cellonovo’s innovation in diabetes care and management is a fantastic testament to the health research already underway jointly between the university and health boards.

“ARCH will capitalise on this impressive foundation by expanding the scale and breadth of research excellence to really benefit patients in this region.”

Chad Rogers, founder and CEO of TypeZero Technologies, added: “The integration of Cellnovo’s insulin patch pump with our inControl AP platform is a tremendous step forward for this artificial pancreas product.

"We believe that patients should have the choice of using the insulin delivery device that best suits their needs and lifestyle. The Cellnovo pump, with its connected data system and unique combination of patch pump and infusion set, is an amazing option for patients.

"We look forward to bringing this solution to patients in the upcoming IDCL trial as well as other studies throughout 2016/17.”

PwC, the largest provider of audit and professional services in the UK,  was the company who took Cello Novo public. PwC recently  announced the relocation of their Swansea offices to the Singleton Health Campus as part of the ARCH Programme’s MediPark initiative, creating five new graduate jobs as part of the move.

Swansea University’s Medical School ILS Executive Chairman and Dean of  Management School, Professor Marc Clement,  said of the move last month:  “The arrival of PwC absolutely strengthens the development of the regional Life Sciences and Health ecosystem here in Swansea and indeed South West Wales.”

30 of 36

ILS med-tech firm leads way in transforming diabetes care

City firm pioneers artificial pancreas

A SWANSEA-BASED med-tech business who are pioneering new developments in diabetes care technology have made a ground-breaking advances with an artificial pancreas.

Cellnovo, based in SA1, has developed a digitally connected insulin patch pump which will be used with the artificial pancreas.

The firm, which was founded in the Swansea University Institute of Life Science (ILS)  network, is partnering with US technology company TypeZero, who will use Cellnovo's digitally-connected insulin patch pump alongside its own software in the artificial pancreas. 

The artificial pancreas is designed to automatically monitor and regulate blood-sugar levels in people with Type 1 Diabetes through the delivery of insulin.

Cellnovo is a multi-national company which is headquartered in France but has a major facility in Swansea's SA1 district, which it expanded last year with the renting of a second suite of offices. It recently raised £23 million on Euronext exchange in Paris.

Set up in 2002 with a staff of 75, its products have been developed in the ILS network and their innovative diabetes management system is the first of its kind with mobile connectivity.

This first of its kind  mobile connectivity is able to provide immediate, wireless data updates and display real-time clinical information to patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals. This year should see global deployment of its technology.

Sophie Baratte, chief executive Officer of Cellnovo, said: “We are pleased to be working with TypeZero on this key artificial pancreas programme. This is an important milestone as it will be the first time our diabetes management system will be used by American patients taking part in this leading research programme.

"The Cellnovo diabetes management system is the ideal platform for artificial pancreas system development because of its real-time connected data, as well as its wearability and discreetness.

"The funding by the NIH for the IDCL research programme further demonstrates its key role in AP research.”

 

Cellonovo undertook its clinical trials in Swansea University’s Joint Clinical Research Facility (JCRF) and also manufacturers its products locally. JCRF is a purpose-built clinical research unit based at ABMU’s Morriston Hospital, with a second site at ILS2 on the Singleton Health Campus. Its highly-trained research nursing staff serve a population of more than 500,000 and was established in 1990.

The clinical trials programme is a key component of the ARCH programme. ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) is a unique partnership between ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and Swansea University. ARCH aims to improve the health and wealth of South West Wales through collaboration, innovation and research.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU’s Assistant Medical Director for Research and Development and clinical lead for the Diabetes Research Network Cymru, has praised the ground-breaking work of Cello Novo and the region’s role in helping to develop their products.

Professor Bain, a member of the Wales Diabetes and Endocrine Society and part of the ARCH research and development working group, said: “The involvement of Cellnovo in this pioneering artificial pancreas project highlights the high regard for their insulin patch pump which was developed here in South West Wales.

“This device uses state-of-the-art technology and was first tested in people with diabetes in Swansea’s Joint Clinical Research Facility
(JCRF).”

 

An ARCH spokesman added: “The integration of the existing university campus at Singleton and the hospital site into a new Singleton Health Campus will provide real physical changes which will enhance the collaborative research and innovation activity between the ARCH partners.

“The work of Swansea University’s Medical School, through the ILS, will create a new science MediPark environment where life science research and business can drive the development of the existing local cluster while also attracting world-leading organisations to the region.”

“Cellonovo’s innovation in diabetes care and management is a fantastic testament to the health research already underway jointly between the university and health boards.

“ARCH will capitalise on this impressive foundation by expanding the scale and breadth of research excellence to really benefit patients in this region.”

Chad Rogers, founder and CEO of TypeZero Technologies, added: “The integration of Cellnovo’s insulin patch pump with our inControl AP platform is a tremendous step forward for this artificial pancreas product.

"We believe that patients should have the choice of using the insulin delivery device that best suits their needs and lifestyle. The Cellnovo pump, with its connected data system and unique combination of patch pump and infusion set, is an amazing option for patients.

"We look forward to bringing this solution to patients in the upcoming IDCL trial as well as other studies throughout 2016/17.”

PwC, the largest provider of audit and professional services in the UK,  was the company who took Cello Novo public. PwC recently  announced the relocation of their Swansea offices to the Singleton Health Campus as part of the ARCH Programme’s MediPark initiative, creating five new graduate jobs as part of the move.

Swansea University’s Medical School ILS Executive Chairman and Dean of  Management School, Professor Marc Clement,  said of the move last month:  “The arrival of PwC absolutely strengthens the development of the regional Life Sciences and Health ecosystem here in Swansea and indeed South West Wales.”

30 of 36

Health Minister's £1.2million backing of ARCH

Funding will resource ARCH Programme Office

EFFORTS to transform healthcare across the Swansea Bay City Region have been given huge backing by the powers that be in Cardiff.

The ARCH Programme has received £1.2million of funding from the Health Minister Mark Drakeford to continue their work to transform the health and wealth of the people of South West Wales.

Health and Social Services Minister, Mark Drakeford said: “I welcome the health boards’ commitment to jointly lead this collaboration, working closely with university and local authority partners. The ARCH Programme has made good progress during the last year and I hope this Welsh Government support will help to maintain the pace. 

“Through  ARCH, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda university health boards will be able to drive their future development in ways which genuinely integrate health and care services, using new technologies and services to improve access to care, which are personalised to each patient, available at a time and place which is convenient to them throughout the region.”

Andrew Davies, ARCH chair and ABMU health board chairman, said he was delighted with the backing from Welsh Government.

He said: “This announcement of Welsh Government funding to develop the ARCH Programme  is tremendous news. To have this backing from the Health Minister to progress the ARCH project is wonderful.

“Nothing of the scale and ambition of ARCH, in terms of transforming healthcare, has been attempted in Wales before.  ARCH will not only give us the opportunity to deliver a health care service for people and communities in South  West Wales which is fit for the 21st Century, but it will also bring a  massive boost to the local economy and help to create new jobs for the people of South West Wales.

ARCH will also lead the way in innovation and research by helping to develop cutting-edge technology and treatments which will be of real benefit to our patients.

“This announcement by the Minister is a massive vote of confidence by Welsh Government in the ability of the ARCH partners of ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University to deliver this ambition.
“The three ARCH partners are committed to continuing their efforts to establish this region as a world-leader in innovation, research and healthcare.”

Hywel Dda University Health Board chief executive Steve Moore has also welcomed the funding boost adding: “We are delighted to receive this backing from Welsh Government.  Hywel Dda is proud to be part of the ARCH collaboration and we realise the potential benefits working on a regional footprint will bring to our communities.”

Swansea University’s Vice-Chancellor Richard Davies has also welcomed the backing, adding: “This is fantastic news and a massive endorsement for the vision, enthusiasm, and commitment of the ARCH partners. Even more importantly, it will accelerate delivery to benefit the entire region.”

Sian Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU Director for Strategy and Executive Lead for the ARCH Programme, has praised the Welsh Government for understanding both the ambition and scale of the ARCH vision. She said: “This is a hugely exciting opportunity to make a significant difference to the health, wealth and well-being of the population of South West Wales. We welcome that Welsh Government have recognised the scale of the ARCH ambition, and that they also see the value in our collaborative approach.

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Health Minister's £1.2million backing of ARCH

Funding will resource ARCH Programme Office

EFFORTS to transform healthcare across the Swansea Bay City Region have been given huge backing by the powers that be in Cardiff.

The ARCH Programme has received £1.2million of funding from the Health Minister Mark Drakeford to continue their work to transform the health and wealth of the people of South West Wales.

Health and Social Services Minister, Mark Drakeford said: “I welcome the health boards’ commitment to jointly lead this collaboration, working closely with university and local authority partners. The ARCH Programme has made good progress during the last year and I hope this Welsh Government support will help to maintain the pace. 

“Through  ARCH, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda university health boards will be able to drive their future development in ways which genuinely integrate health and care services, using new technologies and services to improve access to care, which are personalised to each patient, available at a time and place which is convenient to them throughout the region.”

Andrew Davies, ARCH chair and ABMU health board chairman, said he was delighted with the backing from Welsh Government.

He said: “This announcement of Welsh Government funding to develop the ARCH Programme  is tremendous news. To have this backing from the Health Minister to progress the ARCH project is wonderful.

“Nothing of the scale and ambition of ARCH, in terms of transforming healthcare, has been attempted in Wales before.  ARCH will not only give us the opportunity to deliver a health care service for people and communities in South  West Wales which is fit for the 21st Century, but it will also bring a  massive boost to the local economy and help to create new jobs for the people of South West Wales.

ARCH will also lead the way in innovation and research by helping to develop cutting-edge technology and treatments which will be of real benefit to our patients.

“This announcement by the Minister is a massive vote of confidence by Welsh Government in the ability of the ARCH partners of ABMU Health Board, Hywel Dda University Health Board and Swansea University to deliver this ambition.
“The three ARCH partners are committed to continuing their efforts to establish this region as a world-leader in innovation, research and healthcare.”

Hywel Dda University Health Board chief executive Steve Moore has also welcomed the funding boost adding: “We are delighted to receive this backing from Welsh Government.  Hywel Dda is proud to be part of the ARCH collaboration and we realise the potential benefits working on a regional footprint will bring to our communities.”

Swansea University’s Vice-Chancellor Richard Davies has also welcomed the backing, adding: “This is fantastic news and a massive endorsement for the vision, enthusiasm, and commitment of the ARCH partners. Even more importantly, it will accelerate delivery to benefit the entire region.”

Sian Harrop-Griffiths, ABMU Director for Strategy and Executive Lead for the ARCH Programme, has praised the Welsh Government for understanding both the ambition and scale of the ARCH vision. She said: “This is a hugely exciting opportunity to make a significant difference to the health, wealth and well-being of the population of South West Wales. We welcome that Welsh Government have recognised the scale of the ARCH ambition, and that they also see the value in our collaborative approach.

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What is ARCH?

ARCH is health and science working together, to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) will generate a future for the people of South West Wales which delivers better health, skills and economic outcomes.  This world-class, visionary project is a collaboration between Abertawe Bro Morgannwg  and Hywel Dda and Swansea University.

It will affect  almost a million people and  works together with social care, voluntary and other public bodies – offering a truly whole systems approach.

 It breaks free from an outdated healthcare system designed over 50 years ago and replaces it with an accessible one specifically planned for today’s needs, in purpose-built or refurbished accommodation. It focuses on keeping people healthy; or better managing disease when they’re ill.

 

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What is ARCH?

ARCH is health and science working together, to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

ARCH (A Regional Collaboration for Health) will generate a future for the people of South West Wales which delivers better health, skills and economic outcomes.  This world-class, visionary project is a collaboration between Abertawe Bro Morgannwg  and Hywel Dda and Swansea University.

It will affect  almost a million people and  works together with social care, voluntary and other public bodies – offering a truly whole systems approach.

 It breaks free from an outdated healthcare system designed over 50 years ago and replaces it with an accessible one specifically planned for today’s needs, in purpose-built or refurbished accommodation. It focuses on keeping people healthy; or better managing disease when they’re ill.

 

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£60million Llanelli Wellness Village plans discussed by Hywel Dda chiefs

Hywel Dda Health Board hosted an event to discuss Wellness Village plans, which form part of the ambitious ARCH Programme.

PLANS for how the health service can contribute to a multi-million pound health and wellbeing village  in Llanelli have been discussed by leading West Wales health bosses.

 

Hywel Dda Health Board hosted an event in Carmarthen in November to discuss the plans, which form part of the ambitious ARCH Programme.

The £60 million Llanelli Wellness Village, led by Carmarthenshire Council, which would be the first of its kind in Wales  and  unique to Llanelli.

 

The scope that the health service and transformational ARCH Programme could play in the development  was discussed by Hywel Dda chief executive Steve Moore and senior health staff at the Carmarthen Leisure Centre workshop held to discuss ARCH.

 

ARCH  is a collaboration between Hywel Dda, its Swansea counterpart ABMU and Swansea University. It also spans six local authority areas of Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, Bridgend, Neath Port Talbot and Swansea. It is poised to bring huge benefits to West Wales though world class technology for patients; improved recruitment meaning more staff on hospital wards and a major boost to the region’s economy through working with global commercial, including  technology and pharmaceutical  partners.

 

 

The proposed  Llanelli Wellness Centre is just one element of the ARCH project and aims to see a new leisure centre built which will also a wellness education centre, a health and wellbeing academy, out of hours GP services, therapies centre, hotel and conferencing and business facilities.

 

Swansea University senior lecturer and ARCH Project Manager  Bjorn Rodde spoke to  Hywel Dda staff  members about the potential benefit,  not only to Llanelli but the entire region of South West Wales.

He said: “All of these services help people live longer and enjoy a better quality of life while providing sustainable jobs for the future.”

 

 

The Llanelli Wellness community in Delta Lakes, could  also see the development of ILS@Hywel Dda. The Institute of Life Science (ILS) is Wales’s premier purpose-built medical research  facility and is based at Swansea University. 

It is hoped Carmarthenshire will benefit from the same innovation and research which benefits all our health with the creation of the Hywel Dda facility in Llanelli.

Funding could come from the EU but also from private investment and match funding in various forms. Carmarthenshire Council has said it would supply the land for the project.

 

Hywel Dda chief executive Steve Moore told the invited audience that the health board is committed to the ARCH Programme but urged his senior managers to make the most of what ARCH can offer.

He said: “ARCH will be everything to everyone, but as a health board we must be clear about what we want to get out of the project for our communities.

“This programme really does offer us the chance to improve the services we deliver across the Hywel Dda area and to transform the way we operate as an organisation.

“We are committed to ARCH, but now is the time to work with our partners and be specific about what it can bring to us.”

He emphasised that working effectrively as a region is in the hands of the Hywel Dda team He added:   “Collaboration is a choice.”

 

 

Another of the guest speakers at the Carmarthenshire event was  Dr Phil Kloer,  Dr Phil Kloer,  Medical Director & Director of Clinical Strategy for Hywel Dda, also praised the ARCH Programme and encouraged his colleagues to support the scheme.

He said: “This will break new ground.  By linking ARCH’s ambitions  with our  local clinical strategy we can be a leader in rural health services and even possibly repatriate certain services to Hywel Dda.

“We do have some fragile service models, we need to work together now and  everyone needs to be a part of it.”

He added: “Now is the moment to connect to ARCH as an organisation.”

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£60million Llanelli Wellness Village plans discussed by Hywel Dda chiefs

Hywel Dda Health Board hosted an event to discuss Wellness Village plans, which form part of the ambitious ARCH Programme.

PLANS for how the health service can contribute to a multi-million pound health and wellbeing village  in Llanelli have been discussed by leading West Wales health bosses.

 

Hywel Dda Health Board hosted an event in Carmarthen in November to discuss the plans, which form part of the ambitious ARCH Programme.

The £60 million Llanelli Wellness Village, led by Carmarthenshire Council, which would be the first of its kind in Wales  and  unique to Llanelli.

 

The scope that the health service and transformational ARCH Programme could play in the development  was discussed by Hywel Dda chief executive Steve Moore and senior health staff at the Carmarthen Leisure Centre workshop held to discuss ARCH.

 

ARCH  is a collaboration between Hywel Dda, its Swansea counterpart ABMU and Swansea University. It also spans six local authority areas of Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, Bridgend, Neath Port Talbot and Swansea. It is poised to bring huge benefits to West Wales though world class technology for patients; improved recruitment meaning more staff on hospital wards and a major boost to the region’s economy through working with global commercial, including  technology and pharmaceutical  partners.

 

 

The proposed  Llanelli Wellness Centre is just one element of the ARCH project and aims to see a new leisure centre built which will also a wellness education centre, a health and wellbeing academy, out of hours GP services, therapies centre, hotel and conferencing and business facilities.

 

Swansea University senior lecturer and ARCH Project Manager  Bjorn Rodde spoke to  Hywel Dda staff  members about the potential benefit,  not only to Llanelli but the entire region of South West Wales.

He said: “All of these services help people live longer and enjoy a better quality of life while providing sustainable jobs for the future.”

 

 

The Llanelli Wellness community in Delta Lakes, could  also see the development of ILS@Hywel Dda. The Institute of Life Science (ILS) is Wales’s premier purpose-built medical research  facility and is based at Swansea University. 

It is hoped Carmarthenshire will benefit from the same innovation and research which benefits all our health with the creation of the Hywel Dda facility in Llanelli.

Funding could come from the EU but also from private investment and match funding in various forms. Carmarthenshire Council has said it would supply the land for the project.

 

Hywel Dda chief executive Steve Moore told the invited audience that the health board is committed to the ARCH Programme but urged his senior managers to make the most of what ARCH can offer.

He said: “ARCH will be everything to everyone, but as a health board we must be clear about what we want to get out of the project for our communities.

“This programme really does offer us the chance to improve the services we deliver across the Hywel Dda area and to transform the way we operate as an organisation.

“We are committed to ARCH, but now is the time to work with our partners and be specific about what it can bring to us.”

He emphasised that working effectrively as a region is in the hands of the Hywel Dda team He added:   “Collaboration is a choice.”

 

 

Another of the guest speakers at the Carmarthenshire event was  Dr Phil Kloer,  Dr Phil Kloer,  Medical Director & Director of Clinical Strategy for Hywel Dda, also praised the ARCH Programme and encouraged his colleagues to support the scheme.

He said: “This will break new ground.  By linking ARCH’s ambitions  with our  local clinical strategy we can be a leader in rural health services and even possibly repatriate certain services to Hywel Dda.

“We do have some fragile service models, we need to work together now and  everyone needs to be a part of it.”

He added: “Now is the moment to connect to ARCH as an organisation.”

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Clinical Research Excellence

Swansea's reputation for clinical research excellence set for a boost thanks to ambitious proposals

Swansea's status as a city of excellence for clinical research could be massively boosted in years to come — with the benefits felt across the South West Wales region.

The city's two main hospitals and the university's School of Medicine already collaborate on a wide range of clinical trials which are not just good for patients they are good for the NHS and the local economy too.

Now ambitious proposals to transform healthcare across South West Wales — revealed by the Post in July — will see more trials taking place in both the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda university health board areas.

Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) will bring health and science together to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

A world-class collaboration between the two health boards and Swansea University, it will replace an outdated healthcare system with one specifically designed for today's needs.

It will also promote research, training and skills — creating the potential for a significant increase in clinical trials.

What makes the region special is its unusually stable, homogenous population of around a million people, many with chronic illnesses which plague the modern world, like cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

This combination is a potential honey-pot for research and development companies developing treatments and devices.

Arch's visionary scope is recognised by Arnaud Bernaert, head of health and healthcare industries for the World Economic Forum, who attended the Arch launch event in the Liberty Stadium in September.

He said a number of key characteristics of Arch were in line with those of the WEF. He added: "There is an opportunity for us to collaborate. We are, at the Economic Forum, a platform for public-private partnership, and have connected public-private sectors for the past 45 years."

"I'm totally convinced that many of our 40 partners in healthcare practice would be very interested in what you do. Maybe this is an opportunity to accelerate the progress of this initiative."

Clinical trials involve new medicines or devices that are being licensed and are trialled on patients, who have agreed to take part, to determine whether they are safe and more effective than current treatments.

One involved a new diabetes medicine. Treboeth granddad Ron Beynon, diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes 25 years ago, took part and has seen a remarkable transformation.

His weight, which had gone up, has fallen dramatically and his insulin dose is now much reduced.

Ron, aged 75, said: "I'm very close to being a non-diabetic. It is reversible but you've got to put the work in."

Like others on the trial, in Morriston Hospital's Diabetic Centre, he doesn't know if he had the medication or a placebo (non-active dummy). But, he said, the fact he was involved made him get to grips with his condition.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU's assistant medical director for research and development, said: "There is evidence that people on clinical trials do better than people who aren't.

"There's also evidence that people who take their medicine regularly, whether it's active or a placebo, do better as well.

"If we can encourage people to get involved in clinical trials and get engaged with their condition, they tend to do better."

Professor Bain said Swansea had a good track record of working with new drugs for treating diabetes. He added: "We already see ourselves as a leading centre and attract work from global pharmaceutical companies.

"Hopefully the development of Arch will lead to an upscaling of our activities so we can become a major player in the global search for new diabetes medicines.

"That in turn gives people in South West Wales the opportunity to take part in clinical trials so it will be a win-win situation."

Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the medical school, they save the NHS money because the medicines are provided free by the companies trying to license them.

Having people on these trials also frees up places within hospitals so NHS patients can be treated more quickly.

Clinical trials benefit the local economy too. Self-employed Swansea taxi driver Dave Thompson provides the transport for patients on the trials.

When he started eight years ago it was worth a few hundred pounds a month — now it generates 10 times that. Dave said: "I've had to take other drivers on. They're self-employed and do the work for me. They're landed."

Professor Bain said: "Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, Arch gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales. All these trials are closely monitored and we have people visiting on a weekly basis to keep tabs on them. If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy."

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Clinical Research Excellence

Swansea's reputation for clinical research excellence set for a boost thanks to ambitious proposals

Swansea's status as a city of excellence for clinical research could be massively boosted in years to come — with the benefits felt across the South West Wales region.

The city's two main hospitals and the university's School of Medicine already collaborate on a wide range of clinical trials which are not just good for patients they are good for the NHS and the local economy too.

Now ambitious proposals to transform healthcare across South West Wales — revealed by the Post in July — will see more trials taking place in both the Abertawe Bro Morgannwg and Hywel Dda university health board areas.

Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) will bring health and science together to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales.

A world-class collaboration between the two health boards and Swansea University, it will replace an outdated healthcare system with one specifically designed for today's needs.

It will also promote research, training and skills — creating the potential for a significant increase in clinical trials.

What makes the region special is its unusually stable, homogenous population of around a million people, many with chronic illnesses which plague the modern world, like cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

This combination is a potential honey-pot for research and development companies developing treatments and devices.

Arch's visionary scope is recognised by Arnaud Bernaert, head of health and healthcare industries for the World Economic Forum, who attended the Arch launch event in the Liberty Stadium in September.

He said a number of key characteristics of Arch were in line with those of the WEF. He added: "There is an opportunity for us to collaborate. We are, at the Economic Forum, a platform for public-private partnership, and have connected public-private sectors for the past 45 years."

"I'm totally convinced that many of our 40 partners in healthcare practice would be very interested in what you do. Maybe this is an opportunity to accelerate the progress of this initiative."

Clinical trials involve new medicines or devices that are being licensed and are trialled on patients, who have agreed to take part, to determine whether they are safe and more effective than current treatments.

One involved a new diabetes medicine. Treboeth granddad Ron Beynon, diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes 25 years ago, took part and has seen a remarkable transformation.

His weight, which had gone up, has fallen dramatically and his insulin dose is now much reduced.

Ron, aged 75, said: "I'm very close to being a non-diabetic. It is reversible but you've got to put the work in."

Like others on the trial, in Morriston Hospital's Diabetic Centre, he doesn't know if he had the medication or a placebo (non-active dummy). But, he said, the fact he was involved made him get to grips with his condition.

Professor Steve Bain, ABMU's assistant medical director for research and development, said: "There is evidence that people on clinical trials do better than people who aren't.

"There's also evidence that people who take their medicine regularly, whether it's active or a placebo, do better as well.

"If we can encourage people to get involved in clinical trials and get engaged with their condition, they tend to do better."

Professor Bain said Swansea had a good track record of working with new drugs for treating diabetes. He added: "We already see ourselves as a leading centre and attract work from global pharmaceutical companies.

"Hopefully the development of Arch will lead to an upscaling of our activities so we can become a major player in the global search for new diabetes medicines.

"That in turn gives people in South West Wales the opportunity to take part in clinical trials so it will be a win-win situation."

Clinical trials are not only income-generating for the health board and the medical school, they save the NHS money because the medicines are provided free by the companies trying to license them.

Having people on these trials also frees up places within hospitals so NHS patients can be treated more quickly.

Clinical trials benefit the local economy too. Self-employed Swansea taxi driver Dave Thompson provides the transport for patients on the trials.

When he started eight years ago it was worth a few hundred pounds a month — now it generates 10 times that. Dave said: "I've had to take other drivers on. They're self-employed and do the work for me. They're landed."

Professor Bain said: "Instead of a trial taking place in perhaps six centres around the UK, Arch gives the opportunity to have them all in South West Wales. All these trials are closely monitored and we have people visiting on a weekly basis to keep tabs on them. If it can be done in one area it will save time and money, and boost the whole economy."

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Investing in Young, Local Talent

Nurturing the talent of local youngsters

Over 200 pupils in Year 11 from Bishopston Comprehensive school have been invited to a special careers conference highlighting the variety of jobs in the NHS and life science sector such as laboratory and scientific testing to help diagnose and treat illnesses.

The first Elevate Conference is being held at Swansea University on Wednesday 21st October and if it proves a hit with the Bishopston pupils there’ll be more to come.

Conference organiser, Bev Wilson-Smith, Advocate of Life Science Skills at Gower College said: “Pupils will be able to take part in interactive workshops supported by academic staff as well as industry giants such as GSK and Fujitsu. Here they’ll have the opportunity to find out all they need to know about their chosen career or even a career they didn’t know existed.”

Hamish Laing, ABMU Medical Director added: “Both ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards face challenges in terms of recruitment. This is not unique to this area but it’s a real problem for us.

“We want to be able to draw on people from our local communities, to encourage them into health and life sciences-related careers so that they want to work in this area and really improve the health of our communities.”

The conference will also introduce the Talent Bank; a new and innovative learning experience for those aged 16 years and over who are interested in a career in the medical, healthcare and scientific professions.

Beverley explained: “Research conducted with national and local employers tell us there’s a real need to increase the skills and talent required for their fields of work. With our partners, employers, academia and the NHS, the Talent Bank will provide young learners with access to industry expertise and specialist facilities that ordinarily they wouldn’t be able to access.

“We’re looking forward to the pupils getting involved and helping us to shape the Talent Bank via an interactive questionnaire.

“We’ve also made a start working with health board staff to identify work placements specifically designed to enable learners to gain insight into working in a hospital or health science environment. These placements will also allow learners to support and help – where appropriate - the professionals and teams they are working with giving them real experience.

“As a result the Talent Bank will enhance the region’s supply of skills and talent for the health and life sciences sector.”

Developing local talent and shaping the future healthcare and life sciences workforce is a key part of the Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) project.

The project, to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales, is a partnership involving ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and Swansea University.

As part of Arch, Gower College Swansea will open a new centre in autumn 2016 for 100 Talent Bank learners. To maximise learning opportunities and work place experience the centre will be located between Swansea University and Singleton Hospital. 

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Investing in Young, Local Talent

Nurturing the talent of local youngsters

Over 200 pupils in Year 11 from Bishopston Comprehensive school have been invited to a special careers conference highlighting the variety of jobs in the NHS and life science sector such as laboratory and scientific testing to help diagnose and treat illnesses.

The first Elevate Conference is being held at Swansea University on Wednesday 21st October and if it proves a hit with the Bishopston pupils there’ll be more to come.

Conference organiser, Bev Wilson-Smith, Advocate of Life Science Skills at Gower College said: “Pupils will be able to take part in interactive workshops supported by academic staff as well as industry giants such as GSK and Fujitsu. Here they’ll have the opportunity to find out all they need to know about their chosen career or even a career they didn’t know existed.”

Hamish Laing, ABMU Medical Director added: “Both ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards face challenges in terms of recruitment. This is not unique to this area but it’s a real problem for us.

“We want to be able to draw on people from our local communities, to encourage them into health and life sciences-related careers so that they want to work in this area and really improve the health of our communities.”

The conference will also introduce the Talent Bank; a new and innovative learning experience for those aged 16 years and over who are interested in a career in the medical, healthcare and scientific professions.

Beverley explained: “Research conducted with national and local employers tell us there’s a real need to increase the skills and talent required for their fields of work. With our partners, employers, academia and the NHS, the Talent Bank will provide young learners with access to industry expertise and specialist facilities that ordinarily they wouldn’t be able to access.

“We’re looking forward to the pupils getting involved and helping us to shape the Talent Bank via an interactive questionnaire.

“We’ve also made a start working with health board staff to identify work placements specifically designed to enable learners to gain insight into working in a hospital or health science environment. These placements will also allow learners to support and help – where appropriate - the professionals and teams they are working with giving them real experience.

“As a result the Talent Bank will enhance the region’s supply of skills and talent for the health and life sciences sector.”

Developing local talent and shaping the future healthcare and life sciences workforce is a key part of the Arch (A Regional Collaboration for Health) project.

The project, to improve the health, wealth and wellbeing of the people of South West Wales, is a partnership involving ABMU and Hywel Dda health boards and Swansea University.

As part of Arch, Gower College Swansea will open a new centre in autumn 2016 for 100 Talent Bank learners. To maximise learning opportunities and work place experience the centre will be located between Swansea University and Singleton Hospital. 

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ARCH Programme Transforming the Health, Wealth and Wellbeing of the Communities of South West Wales

Transforming the Health economy in South West Wales

The ARCH Programme is a partnership Programme between ABMU Health Board Hywel Dda University Health Board, and Swansea University.

Delivering improved health & wellbeing for the communities of South West Wales and improved services for the 1 million people who live in the region.

ARCH aims to develop the workforce that is required for the 21st Century and is working with both the Further Education and Higher Education sectors to deliver this. 

Finally through the partnership ARCH will deliver economic benefits through the development of Health and Life Science sector of the economy.

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